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September 22, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-22

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 22, 1983

Regent defends Shapiro's salary

IN BRIEF

By SHARON SILBAR
Because many University officials
could command higher salaries in the
private sector, Regent Deane Baker
said he believes President Harold
Shapiro's recent raise of almost $10,000
is justified.
But Baker also said he would have
been a little less generous than his
fellow regents were.
"PERSONALLY I would tend to be less
generous in salaries for administrators
and deans," Baker said at yesterday's
Campus Meet the Press in the Michigan
Union Kuenzel Room.
Stanley H. Kaplan
The Smart
MOVE!
c p
8 O

Baker cited Vice President and Chi
Financial Officer James Brinkerhoff
an example of the worth of Universit
administrators. "(Brinkerhoff) refus
a six figure salary (from a priva
firm) a few years ago, and he has say
literally tens of millins of dollars at t
University," he said.
On the subject of the state's ne
commission on higher education whi
met for the first time Monday night
Lansing, Baker said, "one of the be
things that could happen is that tho
leave (the University) alone."
THE COMMISSION will be studyir
teaching, research, and public servi
at state universities for the next ye
and will make its recommendations
Gov. James Blanchard.
Baker, the lone republican of t
eight regents and one of two who vot4
against the recent tuition hike of9

percent, said tuition shouldn't go any
higher, but that the blame for the in-
crease falls on the shoulders of the state
legislators.
"We have not been funded
adequately. Over a ten year period,
tuition hays more than doubled, and
state support has decreased significan-
tly," he said.
THE JUDGMENTS made for the finan-
cing of higher education are made in
the legislature," Baker said. He added
that any solution the commission comes
up with that does not recognize the
power of the legislature won't work.
A strong supporter of Vice President
for Academic Affairs and Provost Billy
Frye, whom he labeled "a man of ab-
solute integrity," Baker said that
although the much criticized budgetary
review process is "laborious, it's a fair
process.

Baker also defended his vote against
University guidelines for unclassified
research at the June regent's meeting.
Recent improvements in the state's
economy, Baker said, will work to the
University's advantage.
"In my view, there will be substan-
tially more money for higher education
in the coming years. There will be less
pressure on tuition, and I see some fur-
ther easing for adjustments to
salaries," he predicted.

Judge

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Be one of the FIRST FIVE people to subscribe and receive:
The soundtrack and two free passes to the
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for strike
settlement
(Continued from Page I)
year of the plan would be negotiated
during the next few months.
INITIALLY, the school board asked
teachers to give up MESSA for a com-
parable, less expensive plan or pay the
difference between the two.
With the insurance issue temporarily
decided, salary remains the major ob-
stacle to a settlement.
Teachers are asking for a four per-
cent wage hike while the school board is
officially offering a 1.5 percent in-
crease.
BUT THE board is likely to make a
final offer of 2.5 percent because
teachers accepted the insurance
proposal, assistant school superinten-
dent Robert Moseley said.
"Progress is entirely up to (the
teachers)," Moseley said, "because I
think the board is serious in saying (a
2.5 percent raise) is their final offer."
Union members earlier said the
board can support a 2.5 percent wage
raise by dipping into its $2 million
equity fund.
BOARD members, however, say
depleting surplus funds would be
unreasonable because revenues in-
creased by only four-tenths of a eprcent
this year.
Last year teachers received an eight
percent wage increase.
Judge Campbell's strong words
urging both sides to reach a settlement
will probably accelerate talks, Moseley
said.
If a settlement is not reached by
Friday, Judge Campbell will supervise
the negotiations, Brownlee said.

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Accused rapist pleads insanity
AKRON, Ohio - The jury deciding whether to convict a medical doctor of
21 rapes and 39 other criminal charges deliberated for more than six hours
yesterday without reaching a verdict.
Dr. Edward Jackson, of Columbus, Ohio, an internist and father of two
teenage daughters has pleaded innocent by reason of insanity to the charges.
However, his attorney, John Bowen, announced at the start of the trial, "We
acknowledge that Dr. Jackson committed the acts with which he is
charged."
The seven-man, five-woman jury, which received the case late Tuesday
after a 21-day trial, was scheduled to resume its deliberations today.
If convicted, the 39-year-old doctor faces up to 1,378 years in prison. An in-
sanity decision would mean his probable confinement to an institution for the
criminally insane.
Israel designates new preniner
JERUSALEM - Yitzhak Shamir was chosen yesterday to form Israel's
next government, virtually assuring the continuation of Prime Minister
Menachem Begin's hardline leadership.
President Chaim Herzog designated Shamir as premier and said he had
found a widespread interest in Parliament and the public for a joint effort by
Labor and Shamir's Likud bloc to heal the economy and extricate the Israeli
army from Lebanon.
Shamir has the support of all six parties in Begin's coalition, ensuring him
of up to 64 of the 120 votes in Parliament.
Responding to demands from several coalition parliamentarians for a
national unity government made up of all major Knesset factions, Shamir
invited the opposition Labor Party to join his new government.
The idea, however, was quickly rejected by Labor leader Shimon Peres,
who said he would not join a national coalition unless Begin's policies were
changed.
"Our way differs from theirs," Peres said, while agreeing to meet Shamir
for talks.
Court orders aid for dying girl
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. - A state appeals court ordered immediate medical
treatment yesterday for a preacher's 12-year-old daughter who suffers from
deadly bone cancer, despite her father's claim that the family's religion for-
bids use of medicine.
For two months, Larry Hamilton has fought treatment of the football-sized
Ewing's sarcoma tumor that has destroyed much of his daughter Pamela's
upper left leg bone.
Without chemotherapy and radiation treatments, doctors say the 86-pound
girl will die within nine months. Even with immediate treatment, ier chance
of survival is less than 50-50.
In a seven-page opinion, three Tennessee Court of Appeals judges
unanimously upheld a juvenile court's decision to declare Pamela a neglec-
ted child, award temporary custody to the state and order treatment.
"While the prognosis with treatment in Pamela's case is guarded, the con-
sequences of no treatment is certain, painful death," the judges said.
The decision was immediately appealed to the state Supreme Court.
GM - Toyota to rehire workers
DETROIT - The United Auto Workers and the General Motors Corp. -
Toyota joint venture have reached a working agreement calling for former.
GM workers to be hired at the Fremont, Calif. production site, union sources
said yesterday.
The union called a news conference for today, presumably to announce the
deal. Former Labor Secretary William J. Usery, hired by the joint venture
to negotiate with the union, also planned a news conference in Washington.
A GM spokesman declined comment, saying, "We don't know anything
about it."
The agreement calls for the work force at the plant to be made up of for-
mer Fremont workers who held jobs there before GM closed the plant last
year. It also reportedly deals with seniority rights for those laid-off workers.
The Japanese automaker drew fire from the union earlier this year when it
said it wanted to have "a free hand" in hiring and would not give preference
to former GM workers.
Slowed economy grows steadily
WASHINGTON - The government estimated yesterday that the
economy is growing at a strong 7 percent annual rate in the third quarter, a
slowdown from what analysts say was an unsustainable burst of business ac-
tivity in the spring.
"We want solid and steady economic expansion," said Treasure Secretary
Donald T. Regan, "and we are getting it."
The Commerce Department said in its preliminary "flash" estimate for
the still-unfinished July-September quarter that the growth will come from
the building of inventories by business firms and from final sales, which
covers all buying by consumers and business.
It said the GNP, the total value of goods and services, expanded at an an-
nual rate of 9.7 percent in the April-June period rather than the 9.2 percent
estimated last month, the 8.7 estimated in July and the 6.6 predicted in its
June "flash."
Commerce Secretary Malcom Baldridge said with the additional, though
slower, growth predicted in the GNP this quarter, the value of the nation's
output will be at an all-time high. The expansion since the recovery started
late last year has more than made up for the drop of 1981-1982 recession and
put the GNP 1.7 percent above the previous peak reached in the third quarter
of 1981.

Vol. XCIV - No. 13
Thursday, September 22, 1983
(ISSN 0745-967X)
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $15.50 September through April (2 semesters); $19.50 by
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