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September 21, 1983 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

t

Season hockey tickets for stud-
ents available at athletic ticket
office.

SPORTS

Limited football tickets available
for Northwestern, Indiana, and
Purdue games at athletic ticket
office.
Page 7

he Michigan Daily

Wednesday, September 21, 1983

JUNIOR NELSON STANDS OUT sa.
hOk

TougL
By CHUCK JAFFE
On the field, in practice and near the
oal-line, Michigan tight end Sim
elson stands out in a crowd.
Nelson, a 6-2, 235 pound junior,
managed to free himself from a crowd
of Washington Huskies Saturday to cat-

en
tight en
ch seven passes for 88 yards in just the
first half.
BUT LONG before stepping into a
Wolverine uniform, Nelson's size,
athletic ability and style were making
him a unique performer.
Nelson was recruited by only two

d

turns heads

schools - Michigan and Ball State
University - but it took a spectacular
performance for the Wolverines to even
consider offering a scholarship.
"(Strength and conditioning) Coach
(Mike) Gittleson came to my high
school to see a running back named
Tim Hines who now plays for the
University of Indiana," said Nelson.
"The night he came to watch me play I
played fullback, tight end, linebacker,
defensive tackle and did all the punting
and placekicking. Hines gained 295
yards, but Coach Gittleson came back
and told Coach Bo that I was a
ballplayer."

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Thursday, Sept. 22
4:30-6 p.m.
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BUT EVEN Schembechler took his
time , before deciding exactly what
type of ballplayer Nelson would
become. Recruited as an outside line-
backer/tight end, the Fort Wayne, Ind.
native played both tight and split end,
s a freshman, before switching to out-
j side linebacker during 1981 spring prac-
tice. The following fall, however,
Nelson returned to the offense to fill in
for an injured Eric. Kattus as the
reserve tight end.
"I like playing tight end better, so I'm
glad I got to switch back," said Nelson,
who has nine catches for 109 yards.
"Sim's a good receiver," added
Schembechler. "A tight end who gets
open is tough to defend."
NELSON HAS had less trouble
evading defensive backs than he has
had getting playing time with the
-. Wolverines, however. Tight end is one

of the Wolverines' most crowded
positions, with Kattus, senior Milt Car-
thens, sophomore Paul Schemerge, and
Nelson all capable of breaking into the
starting lineup.
Pass-catching ability, along with im-
proved blocking and an injury to Kattus
have pulled Nelson out from the group
to start, but he knows he must continue
to improve to remain on the field.
"All four of us get along really good,"
Nelson said. "We're battling for a job,
but our main goal is for the team to do
well. We always converse. It's all for
the team. We tell each other what we
see out on the field, and talk about how to
work some plays."
"WE HAVE to always be at our best,
because any one of us can play," Nelson
added. "That gives us some incentive."
Nelson's own incentive now is to im-
prove as an all-around tight end.
Although catching seven passes against
Washington was Nelson's best
receiving performance ever, the junior
said that improvement in his blocking
is needed before he can have a truly
outstanding game.
"Anybody can catch the ball, but not
too many people can do both," Nelson
said. "I want to block. That's part of my
job."
With Nelson's background, it is
probable that his blocking will improve
drastically during the next few games.
If that happens, Sim Nelson will be an
important part of the crowd blocking
near the goal lines.

Daily Photo
Sim Nelson (95) runs over Washington State's Cedric Brown (16) in the season
opener. This was one of Nelson's two receptions in that game.
Sports enthusiasts delight
in variety of IM sports

THIRD WORLD FILMS/ DOCUMENTARY
Wed. eve, 7:30-St. Andrews Episcopal Church
Thrus., 4:15-Aud. "B" Angell Hall
Thurs., 8:00-Campus Center, 921 Church St.

Stickers, McCarty
sweep by Hurons

Sept. 21/22
Sept. 28/29

You Have Struck a Rock (28 min.-about Black
South African woman)
Generations of Resistance (52 min.-about Black
notignalism in South Africa)
-a ,
War of the Gods (66 min.-about Indians in
northwest Amazonia)
Sky Chief (26 min.-about Indian exploitation
in Ecuador)

By STEVE HUNTER
The skies looked threatening and so
did the Eastern Michigan f,'ield hockey
team at the beginning of yesterday's
match, but the sun and Michigan by a
score of 3-1 both prevailed.
Eastern, which coach Candy Zientek
characterized as "improved tremen-
dously," opened the scoring when Jen
Cunningham managed to beat the Blue
defense and score on a one-on-one
breakaway.
MICHIGAN SOON regained momen-
tum, however, and had the ball
repeatedly in the EMU half of the field,
as well as outshooting the Hurons,
having several corners, and a penalty
shot. Michigan was unable to capitalize

For Information: Ethics and Religion
2340 Michigan Union - 764-7442

on the penalty shot, when the Eastern
goaltender caught the ball rather than
knocking it down with an open palm.
Soon after, though, Michigan's two
co-captains and seniors, Denise Comby
and Kay McCarthy, teamed up for a
score. Comby set the ball up for McCar-
thy on a corner, and the New Jersey
native fired theball in for the goal.
Following the score, Michigan
aggressively kept the ball in the
Eastern Michigan zone for most of the
remainder of the half thanks to offen-
sive hustle by forwards Lisa Schofield
and Kim Liu, and tough defense by
Bridget Sickon.
The result was another McCarthy
score, this time assisted by Schofield.
THE FINAL GOAL OF the game
came off the stick of freshman Joan
Taylor, who was assisted by Liu. That
goal was icing on the cake, though, as
Taylor punched it in with less than a
minute left in the game.
After the contest, Zientek had praise
for her co-captains, as well as Liu and
Sickon, who were named attack and
defensive players of the game, respec-
tively. As a team, Zientek said, "I think our
entire defense did well."
A big test for the team will come on
Friday when Michigan faces a highly-
regarded Northwestern squad.

By DOUGLAS B. LEVY
The sound is a familiar one. Worn out
and dusty cleats, the fist pounding of a
well oiled and soiled glove and the chat-
ter of a group of enthused individuals.
Intramural softball has begun,
signifying the commencement of yet
another year of IM sports at Michigan,
STUDENTS, faculty, staff and Ann
Arbor residents are streaking to the
ball fields and playgrounds in
seemingly record nubmers.
Witness these figures: there are 64
Independent teams, 52 Residence Hall
teams, 40- Fraternity teams, 20 Co-
Recreational (men and women) teams,
16 Graduate/Faculty/Staff tams, and 4
Women's Teams, not including several
"non-competitive" teams.
Many of the teams have yet to play
their first game (the season started last
weekend), but champions in all six
divisions will be determined by October
11th so that touch football can begin
play on October 12th.
TO FOLLOW the progress of your
rival competitors, look for scores in the
Daily.
Though attracting hordes of par-
ticipants, IM softball is not the only
sport in progress.
Last weekend Bob Allis and Kim
Canada defeated Jon Bowdler and
Nancy Libecki, 8-4, to capture the Co-
Rec (mixed doubles) championship.
THIS COMING Saturday and Sunday,
the men's and women's singles tour-
naments will be played. Eighty-eight.

TheIM Digest is a weekly feature in the
Daily summarizing the past week's in.
tramural activities at the University -]
Michigan.

people have entered the two draws, and
entries are closed.
Tonight and tomorrow night the IV
track meet will be held. Fraternities,
Independents and G/F/S compete 1n
tonight's events, while Women and the
Residence Halls compete Thursday
evening.
Golf is the final sport. Match-play,
competition must be held at the rate of
one-match per week until a champion is
determined. Tee-off times are by com-,
petitor consent.

ThinkI
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GRIDDE PICKS
Looking for a way to impress that
cute girl who sits next to you in
Chemistry class? We've got just the
way. Just take 10 minutes to fill out
your Griddes form and turn it in at Piz-
za Bob's in midtown or on State Street
or bring it to the Daily offices at 420
Maynard. When you win the contest,
just show her a copy of the Daily in
which you are proclaimed a football
genius. Then invite her to your pad to
help you eat the small one-item pizza
you have won. But when her boyfriend,
who is captain of the rugby team comes
looking for you, don't come running to
the Daily for help. It was your idea.
Include your name, address and
phone number with your picks. Selec-
tions must be in by midnight on Friday.
1. MICHIGAN at Wisconsin (pick score)
2. Northwestern at Indiana
3. Illinois at Michigan State
4. Ohio State at Iowa
5. Purdue at Minnesota
6. UCLA at Nebraska
7. Tulane at Kentucky
8. Penn State at Temple
9. Miami (Fla.) at Notre Dame
10. Alabama at Vanderbilt
11. Washington at LSU
12. Arizona at Washington State
13. Auburn at Tennessee
14. Central Michigan at Western Michigan
15. South Carolina at Georgia
16. San Jose St. at Stanford
17. USC at Kansas
18. Tennessee Tech at Murray State
19. Nebraska Omaha at Morningside
20. DAILY LIBELS at Little Rascals

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