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September 20, 1983 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-20

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The Michigan Daily, Tuesday, September 20, 1983-- Page 3

Teachers strike may land in court

By BARBARA MISLE
Ann Arbor school board officials have
threatened to take striking teachers to
court if 'a settlement isn't reached this
week and teachers say a judge's inter-
vention could speed up negotiations.
Although board officials are only con-
sidering moving negotiations into U.S.
District Court, teachers say such a
move could push the 14-day-old strike
closer to an end.
"MAYBE AN objective third party
could help," said Gerry VanWambeke,
chief negotiator for the Ann Arbor
Education Association, the teachers'
union.
"We would hope the parties can settle
the dispute by themselves, but our
feeling is not one of being particularly
concerned about (the threat of going to
court)," VanWambeke said.
If the board moved talks into court, it
is likely that teachers would be ordered

"We just want teachers back in classrooms.
There are kids out there suffering."
- Errol Goldman,
chief negotiator
Ann Arbor school board

back to school while negotiations con-
tinued on the two disputed issues of
health insurance and salary increases,
said Errol Goldman, head negotiator
for the board.
"WE JUST WANT teachers back in
classrooms," Goldman said. "There
are kids out there suffering."
The start of school for 14,000 students.
has been delayed for 13 days.
Teachers have refused the board's

request that they give up their current
insurance policy through the Michigan
Education Special Services Ad-
ministration (MESSA) for a com-
parable, but less expensive, plan.
UNDER THE latest board proposal,
which teachers also rejected, teachers
would have the MESSA option to phase
out MESSA over three years. or pay ex-
tra for that coverage.
On Saturday the board moved under

the Public Employees Relations Act to
implement the final three-year
" proposal on insurance unless a different
settlement is reached. Under the acts if
board officials have made a "good faith
effort" toward bargaining, they can or-
der into effect their best offer, said
Robert Mosely, assistant school
superintendant.
Teachers say the move is in-
significant because they refuse to
return to school.
Negotiators said teachers would
return to work if they could keep MESSA
for this year and continue negotiations
on the following years through a
mediator appointed by the Michigan
Employment Relations Commission.
The board, however, rejected that
proposal Sunday.
Teachers are also asking for a 4 per-
cent wage increase while the board is
only offering a 2.5 percent hike.
ANN ARBOR
INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
a 5th Are aofLGbert 701-9700
$1 .50 TUESDAY ALL DAY
' BRUCE BERESFORD'S
FRO HE t1
DIRECTOR OF
BREAKERMORANT" WRS.
1 AND
TENDER MERCIES
TUES. & WED.A UNIVERSAL CLASSIC
1:00, 3:10, 5:10, 7:10, 9:10
"UNUSUALLY RICH"
New York Tines
GERARD DEPARDIEU

Hart discusses Central America

(Continued from Page 1)
HART ALSO attacked Reagan's con-
tention that the conflict in El Salvador
is a threat to Mexican security. Mexico
had participated in the rebel forces'
negotiation efforts, he said, and the
Mexican government "is intelligent
enough to know when its own national
security is at stake" without the United

States telling Mexicans "what's in their
interests.".
Hart, who has spent nine years in the
U.S. Senate, and was George
McGovern's campaign manager in
1972, has lagged significantly behind
Democratic candidates Walter Mon-
dale and John Glenn in the opinion
polls.

But he said he is not discouraged by
the statistics, saying that former
presidents Jimmy Carter and John
Kennedy were just as far behind at the
same point in their campaigns.
After a question-and-answer session
and press conference, Hart walked
through the Law Quad and attended a
$50-per-person wine and cheese cam-
paign fundraiser at Dominick's
restaurant. The gathering attracted top
city and county Democratic leaders,
including State Rep. Perry Bullard (D-
Ann Arbor):
Bullard, who said he will back Mon-
dale for the Democratic nomination,
predicted that both Mondale and Glenn
would do well in Michigan.
He added, however, that he thought
Hart might become the Democratic
vice-presidential nominee.

Daily Photo by SCOTT ZOLTON
Swing your partner
Barb Belisie, President of the A-squares, a local square dance club, twirls
through a dance at the club's weekly meeting in the Union last night.
-HAPPENINGS-

STUES., WED.
1:10, 3:15, 5:20, 7:25, 9:30

I

Highlight
Yin Cheng-Zong, the foremost pianist from the People's Republic of China,
will present his first American recital tonight at 8:30 p.m. in Hill
Auditorium. The concert, which will include sonatas by Mozart, Beethoven
and Liszt, precedes Yin's official American debut at Carnegie Hall on Sept.
28.
Films
Ann Arbor Film Coop - Late Spring, 7 p.m., Une Femme Douce, 9 p.m.,
Aud. A, Angell.
Cinema Guild; Cinema II - Blow Up, 7 & 9:05 p.m., Dick Tracy serial,
6:30 p.m., Lorch.
Rackham, Offices of Student Services and Ethics and Religion, etc. -
Companero, 4 p.m., Aud. B, Angell.
Performances -
EMOU -Gabriel Kne Organ Dedicatioh Series concert, 8 p~m.,orgah
studio of EMU's Alexander Music Building, Ypsilanti.
Speakers
Guild House; Am. Friends Service Comm.; Latin American Solidarity
Comm. - Jeanette Good, "Women & Non-Violence," 7:30 p.m., 1910 Hill.
Deta Sigma Pi Bus. Fraternity - George Mild, "Corporate Politics," 4
p.m., Hale Aud.
Renaissance Universal Club - "Learn to Meditate in One Evening," 7
7 p.m., Anderson Rm: A.
Bahai Club - "The Case of the Missing Millenium and the Return of
Christ, "7:30 p.m., Anderson Rm. D.
Psychology - Barbara Schlumpf, "The Efficiency of Visual Recovery
Mediated by the Induced Inspilateral etino-Tectal Projection in Goldfish,"
12:30 p.m., 1057 MHRI.
Chemistry - Charles DePuy, "Gas-Phase Ion-Molecule Reactions of
Organic Anions," 4 p.m., 1300 Chem.
Ecumenical Campus Ctr; Int'l Ctr; Church Women United in Ann Arbor -
Jeannette Good, "Is Brazil Another Central America?" noon, Int'l. Center.
UM Hospitals - Peter Martin, "Living Happily Ever After: How to Make
Your Marriage Work," 7:30 p.m. League ballroom.
Eclipse - Hiazen Schumacher, general'introduction to lecture series on
early jazz, 7:30 p.m., Studio B of WUOM-FM, 5th floor, LSA Bldg.
Chinese Studies - James Crumb. "Songs from Xanadu - Where's
Xanadu? Who Sang the Songs and Why?" noon, Commons Rm., Lane Hall.
Computing Center - chalk talk, CC Consulting Staff, "Using MTS File
Commands, 12:10 p.m., 1011 NUBS; Forrest Hartman, "Intro to IBM 3278
Display Terminal," 3:30 p.m., 165 BSAD'.; Bob Blue, "Intro to MTS II," 7
p.m., 2235 Angell.
Latin American Culture Project - Patricio Manns, "The New Chilean
Song Movement," 7p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Biological Sciences - Sally Allen, "Organization of the 58 RNA Gene
Clusters in the Germ-Line & Somatic Genomes of Tetrahymena," noon, 1139
Nat. Sci. Bldg.
Museum of Art - Rebecca Whithouse, "Gerome Kamrowski: A
Retrospective Exhibition," 12:10 p.m., W. Gallery.
Rudolph Steiner Institute - E. Katz, "The Soul Nature of Man," 8 p.m.,
1923 Geddes.
Ann Arbor Latin American Solidarity Committee - Hector Marroquin,
"My Story," 7:30 p.m., Anderson Rm., Union.
EMU - Nikki Moss, "Resume Preparations and Interview Techniques," 2
p.m., Alumni Lounge of EMU McKenny Union.
Meetings
His House Christian Fellowship - 7:30 p.m., 925 E. Ann.
Ann Arbor Go Club -7p.m., 1433 Mason.
CEW - Job Hunt Club drop-in support, noon, 350S. Thayer, second floor of
the Coamerica Bank..
Bicycle Club -8 p.m.,,1084 E. Engin.
Lesbian Network -7 p.m., 802 Monroe.
Windsurfing Club -7 p.m., 4398 Mason.
Lutheran Campus Ministry - Women's Support Group Mtg., 7:30 p.m.,
South Forest at Hill.
Musket - mass meeting for "West Side Story," 9 p.m., Pendleton Rm. of
Union.
Comic Opera Guild - mass meeting for "Babes in Toyland" and "The
Merry Widow," 7:30 p.m., Ann Arbor Public Library.
Student Alumni Council - 7:30 p.m., Alumni Center.
Miscellaneous
Extension Service - 1983 short courses for assessing personnel, League,
second floor concourse.

76,

Need to talk?
Call
-GUIDE
open all night every night-5 pm to 9 am
24 hours on the weekend
ntial peer counseling over the phone.
ervention and referral
, or someone you know, needs help,
t someone to talk to, call
UIDE. We're here to listen.
Counseling Services

Frye says worst is
over for budget cuts,

- Confider
- Crisis int
If you
orjust
76-G t

(Continued from Page 1)
dards. This year's freshman class,
however, is the smartest incoming
group of the last several years;
* The University is now heavily
dependent on tuition for its income, as
demonstratdd by this term's 9.5 percent
hike;
* A salary gap continues to exist bet-
ween University faculty and their peers
across the nation, which may make it
increasingly more difficult to retain
quality professors and researchers:

and
* The rising cost of utilities will con-
tinue to absorb a larger portion of the
University's budget in the future.
Frye said he does not think the
University" has suffered any damage
during the .irst phase of the five-year
plan.
"I believe our standing among the
great universities of the world has been
undiminished," Frye said. "We have
been strengthened."

_,

MASS MEETING,
SEPT. 20 & 21
Alumni Center 7:30pm

(d0

Student Alumni Council

763-9740

"STUDENTS HELPING STUD ENTS"

__

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U e llie litn t

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