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September 18, 1983 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Sunday, September 18, 1983

i

Late W
(Continued from Page 1)
MICHIGAN THEN LOOKED like it would
put the game out of reach as it went down the
field, picking up four first downs, and found
itself at the Huskies' 20. Two plays later,
though, Smith's pass to Steve Johnson was
broken up on third down and Schembechler
called on Schlopy. The 32-yard kick was no
good.
"It went close over the post, but it was no
good," said a disappointed Schlopy.
"We should have put it out of reach and we
didn't do it," said Schembechler. "He
(Schlopy) should have knocked it in and we
wouldn't have to worry about it."
BUT THE MISSED kick was not the only
reason for the Michigan defeat. The
Wolverines simply could not control Pelluer.
Michigan's lack of pass rush was very ap-
parent and didn't help the situation any. The
Washington quarterback had all the time in
the world to throw and he made good on it.
"I wish we would have done a little bit bet-
ter job rushing," said Schembechler. "Maybe
we should have (blitzed) more."
In fact, the Michigan defense forced the
Huskies to punt just once. Washington stop-
ped itself three times on two fumbles and an
interception.
SCORING
MICHIGAN ........................... 3 0 14 7-24
Washington ........................... 3 7 0 15-25
SCORING PLAYS
MICH. -Schlopy 35-yard FG
WASH. - Jaeger 33-yard FG
WASH. - Stransky 19-yard pass from Pelluer (Jaeger kick)
MICH.- Rogers 5-yard run (Schiopy kick)
MICH.- S. Smith 1 yard run (Schlopy kick)
MICH.-- Mallory fumble recovered in endzone (Schlopy kick
WASH. - Hunt 3-yard run (Jaeger kick)
WASH.- Pattison 7-yard pass from Pelluer (Michaels pass
from Pelluer)

ashington

rally beats

Michigan

MICHIGAN ALSO HAD trouble running
against the Huskies. Rogers seemed tired in
the second half and gained only 70 yards on 22
carries in the game. Schembechler noted he
may have used the tailback too much early in
the game.
That forced Smith to go to the air and he
responded brilliantly as the Huskies' defense,
like Michigan's, had trouble with the pass.
Smith found tight end Sim Nelson for seven
passes and wide receiver Vince Bean for five,
many in crucial situations.
"We wanted to pass, not necessarily up-
field, but we did want to pass," Schembechler
said. "I was pleased with the way Smith
played."
SMITH PLAYED WELL right from the
start as he put Michigan in position to score
first, after Vince DeFelice recovered a
Washington fumble at the Wolverine 47 early
in the first quarter. Smith took Michigan to
the Huskies' 18 where the drive stalled and
Schlopy connected on a 35-yard field goal.
Washington responded on its next series
with a 37-yard field goal and in the second
quarter added a touchdown on a 19-yard pass
from Pelluer to split end Dave Stransky to
lead 10-3.
Michigan had a chance to narrow the gap
Last-minute Blues

before halftime when Smith, with the help of
three crucial passes to Nelson, led a drive
down to the Huskies' 15 with about a minute to
go in the second quarter. Three plays later,
Michigan faced a fourth and two at the seven
and Bo elected to go. Rogers took the handoff
up the middle but was stopped inches short
and the half ended, 10-3 Washington.
THE THIRD QUARTER was all Michigan
as the Wolverines controlled the ball for all
but three minutes. With a little over eight-
and-a-half minutes to go, Michigan tied the
game at 10-10 when Rogers ended the 72-yard
drive with a five-yard run up the middle.
Mallory intercepted a Pelluer pass at the
Huskies' 35 and 11 plays later Smith scored on
a one-yard keeper to give Michigan a 17-10
lead with a minute left in the third quarter.
The third quarter ended with Washington
facing a third and seven at its own 21. On the
next play, however, Pelluer was hit hard
while trying to pass, fumbling the ball into the
endzone where Mallory jumped on it for a
touchdown. It looked like the Wolverines had
the game well in hand, but Pelluer more than
made up for his fumble with his fabulous four-
th-quarter performance.

Passing........................
(Att/Comp/It)..............
Total Yards .......................
Fumbles (No/Lost) ................
Punt (No/Avg) ....................
RUSHING
MICHIGAN
Att.

Rogers ....................
S. Smith...............
K. Smith ...............
Armstrong ................
Mercer....................
Rice .......................
Garrett ..................
WASH
Hinds .....................

22
8
5
5
1
2
2

26/18/0
406
0/0
2/34/.0
Yds.
70
50 E
38 1
11
5
4
3
29
26
21 4
6
.7

Avg.
3.2
6.3
7.6
2.2
5.0
2.0
1.5
4.1
2.2
4.2
2.7
1.5
-1.2

33/27/1
352
2/2
1/31.0

TD
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

PASSING
MICHIGAN
Att. Comp
S. Smith .....................C26 18
WASHINGTON
Pelluer ...................... 33 27
RECEIVING
MICHIGAN
No.
Nelson ................ ........... 7
Bean .............................. 5
Rogers.......................... 3
K. Smith .........................1I
G. Johnson ........................ 1
Armstrong ........................ 1
WASHINGTON
Greene.......................... 6
Michaels ......................... 6
Stransky .......................... 5
Pattison ........................... 5
H inds ............................. 3
Hunt ............................. 1
Defeo ............................ 1

Yds.
88
88
19
13
12
5
79
40
73
58
11
5
3

Int. Yds. TD
0 225 0
1 269 2

TD
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Hunt ......................
Robinson ...............
MICH. WASH. Defeo.................
22 25 Jackson...............
45/181 37/83 Pelluer.................
225 269

HINGTON
7
12
5
3
4
6

First downs .......................
.Rushing (Att/Yds.)................
Passing Net Yards .................

Wolverine fullback Greg Armstrong (34) goesd
(5). The Huskies staged a big comeback in, thef

AP Photo
down in the clutches of Washington's Fred Small
fourth quarter to beat Michigan 25-24 in Seattle.

KERRSE WORDS,
BY JOHN KERR

The new Rich Hewlett returns

To all Smith's critics.. .
:You should have been her.
By JOHN KERR
SEATTLE
The fans that boo Wolverine quarterback Steve Smith when he plays at
Michigan Stadium should've seen him play here yesterday against
Washington. That would only have been just.
Smith played what was probably one of the best games of his career as he
completed 18 of 26 passes for 225 yards. He also ran the ball well - 50 yards
on eight carries, and led a Michigan offense that moved the football with
relative ease against the Huskies.
No, this time Smith's critics couldn't call him a choker. They couldn't hang
the loss on his shoulders. The blame had to go to the defense which, despite
forcing three crucial turnovers, couldn't do the job when it had to be done in
the fourth quarter.
But Smith's performance was outstanding, especially considering this was
the first time he played a full game since the Ohio State contest last year. He
also didn't work out very much 'in
spring practice. It wasn't even apparent how much Smith would get to play
yesterday. Bo said early last week that he wanted to use him, but the quar-
terback said his shoulder was still a little sore. So for the Grand Blanc native
to go the whole game and compile his stats is amazing.
Schembechler has always known what his quarterback is capable of, but
Smith's performance yesterday even surprised him."He said he felt good,"
the coach said, "but I'm surprised that with the amount of work he's had he
threw so well."
Smith said that even though his arm had been a bit stiff on Friday he knew
he'd still be able to play. "I'd-been throwing all week and I'd been throwing
real well."
But it wasn't just in the air that Smith excelled as he scored one touchdown
rushing and picked up key yardage on several option plays while scam-
bling. He gave the Husky defense fits and Washington coach Don James will
be happy if he never sees Smith again. "Steve Smith is a very good quarter-
back," he said. "He just picked us apart."
Smith looked a little tentative to run, probably fearing that his shoulder
may get reinjured if he took a good shot. But that fear is unfounded. He is
simply too quick to get hit hard often. The Rose Bowl injury was a fluke.
Still, Smith did take a couple of lesser blows. "I took a couple of hits and it
didn't really bother me too much," he said.
But what did bother Smith was the outcome of the game. He sat dejectedly
by his locker after the game, but still volunteered to answer questions.
"I'm disappointed that we didn't put the ball in the endzone a little more,"
he said. "We had some opportunities but didn't do it.
"We should have won the ballgame, what can I say. When you're ahead 14
points in the fourth quarter you should win. It's disappointing."
The Wolverines though have nine more games to play and if Schembechler
can get his defense together Michigan should have a good football team. Bet-
ter than that, however, if Smith can keep his play anywhere near the level it
was yesterday, he won't be hearing any boo birds.
Boston beats Tigers

By RON POLLACK
R ICH HEWLETT is back.
Actually, he was never gone. It
just appeared that way to the casual
observer of Michigan football.
Hewlett now occupies the Wolverines'
starting strong safety slot, but the path
he took toward this niche on the
Michigan squad was as difficult as it
was unexpected.
As a freshman quarterback he ac-
complished the seemingly unheard of -
he started his first college game ever
against Ohio State. As a sophomore, he
was the Wolverines' starting quarterback
for two games before being replaced by
John Wangler.
Then Hewlett disappeared from
sight. It was as though the world were
flat, he walked too close to the edge and
fell off.
But as everyone knows, the world is
not flat. And as Michigan fans are now
learning, Hewlett did not fall off the
edge.
What he did do was change positions
in 1981. Plagued by arm problems and
the knowledge that then sophomore
.__ 1 ARM-

Steve Smith was the Wolverines' quar-
terback of the future, Hewlett decided
he'd rather switch than fight.
"I had tendinitus in my arm,"
Hewlett said. "Plus, there was a
question of how much I'd play behind
Smith. So the coaches gave me an op-
portunity to move to defensive back
rather than be resigned to being a
backup. I didn't see myself resigned to
being a backup player. I think that at
the time and under the circumstances, I
felt it was something I wanted to do as a
ball player. I didn't have to give it a
whole lot of consideration. It was more
that I didn't want to be a backup than
the shoulder."
Gary Moeller, Michigan's defensive
coordinator and assistant head coach
now, but the Wolverines' quarterback
coach during Hewlett's sophomore
season, said that the Plymouth,
Michigan native's arm troubles should
not be underestimated in his decision to
defect to the defense.
"Rich is a fine kid who would have
probably stayed at quarterback if he
didn't have a sore arm," Moeller said.
"It was a chronic-type thing. He could

only throw 15 to 20 passes in practice
and it'd get sore. So he couldn't perfect
his passing. He could only work a lot on
the option. So he was one-dimensional
and never got i chance to develop his
throwing."
THUS, Hewlett gave up the pain that
accompanied throwing the ball for
a pain that would gnaw away at him
with even greater intensity and agony.
This new-found suffering was that of
not contributing to the team.
During his third year on the team,
and first at defensive back, Hewlett
was red-shirted. It was a trying period
of time for a young man who only a year
earlier had felt the bright glare of at-
tention that accompanies the job of
quarterback.
"After being a part of the team for
two years and contributing, it was
tough to look in from the outside,"
Hewlett said. "The hardest part was
knowing you weren't a part and weren't
travelling (to away games). What
bothered me the most was looking in on
everything and knowing I wouldn't
play."
Inactivity was not all that Hewlett
found troublesome to cope with.
"Tackling probably was the hardest
thing for me to adjust to," Hewlett said.
"I had a lot of hard times learning to
tackle and tackle consistently."
Hewlett's frustrations were not lost
upon the Michigan coaching staff.
"He had some hard changes,"
Moeller said. "Quarterbacks never go
through the tackling drills that defen-
sive players have to. He had to learn to
be tough in a different way.
"He's a tough football player, burt of-
fensively you're tough as a quarterback
because you take hits. On defense
you're tough because you initiate the
hitting."
But since Hewlett has both taken and
initiated hits, as well as faced and been
a part of various pass defenses, he has
an advantage not known to many
defensive backs. Hewlett, you see,
knows how the mind of a wily quarter-
back works.
"Obviously it helps him because he
has an idea of alignments," Moeller
said. "He knows how a quarterback
works, inflection of voice. Maybe he
can break a fraction of a second
earlier."
As a quarterback in a defensive
back's clothing, Hewlett can sometimes
use his experience from his 'signal-
calling days to trick the opposition.
"I can lead them to believe a man will
be open when he's not," Hewlett said.
"I know what the quarterback is
looking for and at, and what they're
looking for in a secondary. I have a
gopd feel for what their key is."

4
I

Hewlett
. . . from QB to DB
coverage are as well as my strengths
and weaknesses. Right now, one of my
weaknesses is probably playing the
run, coming up on the run and sweep,
and taking on blockers."
If all of this seems infinitely less ex-
citing than starting at quarterback
against Ohio State as a freshman, don't
say so to Hewlett. He feels that the Ohio
State game of 1979 was anything but the
pinnacle of his career. Before the
question was even posed to him,
Hewlett balked at the idea that his foot-
ball career can never again reach the
zenith it did that November afternoon
against the Buckeyes.
"I hope you don't write that I started
against Ohio State and that was the only
highlight of my career, the only thing I
ever did," Hewlett said. "Those were
good times, but so are these. I like to
consider myself a football player who
likes to play the game because I like the
game. As far as accolades, that comes
with how well you play your position. So
I don't miss the spotlight of quarter-
back because it'll be put on you regar-
dless of your position if you perform
well as a player."
Regardless of how the rest of this
season treats Hewlett, Moeller believes 4
that the 6-1, 195 pound player has per-
formed extraordinarily well just in
working his way into the starting
lineup.
"He's done a good job," Moeller said.
"The character of the kid shows in a
situation like this. When you see a kid
start as a freshman against Ohio State,
then has a chronic arm problem,
changes positions, takes a couple of

BOSTON (AP) - Tony Armas belted
his 32nd homer leading off the eighth
inning yesterday, lifting the Boston Red
Sox to a 3-2 victory over Jack Morris
and the Detroit Tigers.
The loss dropped the Tigers six-and-
a-half games behind Baltimore, which
played Milwaukee last night.
ARMAS DRILLED a 2-2 pitch for a

the inning.
Boston, held to three hits for six in-
nings, tied the socre 2-2 in the seventh
on a pop double to left by Reid Nichols
and an RBI single by Rick Miller. Jerry
Remy singled and Wade Boggs followed
with another ground single to score
Miller.
Phillies 4, Cardinals 1

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