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September 08, 1983 - Image 26

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-08

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Page 16-A - The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 8, 1983
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
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4

'U'to build
new $60 million
Chem. Building

A

By CHERYL BAACKE
How much does it cost to retain the
University's world-class status in
research and teaching? $60 million in
the field of chemistry, according to
University officials.
That's how much the University and
the state of Michigan could be doling
out to build a new chemistry building
and update the facilities in the old
building.
"THIS WILL BE a top facility," said
Thomas Dunn, a former chairman of
the chemistry department, calling the
current building "grossly inefficient."
Dunn also said that poor air ven-
tilation in the old building is making it a
health hazard for students and
professors working there.
But in addition to a complex new ven-
tilation system, the new building will
supplement current laboratory space,
have a new underground library, and a
complex new computer system.
"THE NEW building will be adap-
table to the changing styles of resear-
ch," Dunn said. "(a new facility) must
be flexible because you don't know
what will come up in the future."
As research techniques have become
more refined and sophisticated the old
laboratories have not been able to
provide the necessary temperature and
humidity controls for experiments,
Dunn said.
Fred Mayer, planning director for the
project, said construction on the site

next to the present building could begin
sometime next year, although the time
schedule depends on when money is
available for the project.
DESPITE THE $60 million price tag
on the building, University ad-
ministrators said the facility is ab-
solutely necessary to keep the Univer-
sity competitive in the chemical scien-
ces.
"(The facility) is an enormously high
priority, something that absolutely
must be done if this institution can con-
tinue to teach chemistry," said Richard
Kennedy, the University's vice
president for state relations.
Because the project is such a high
priority, administrators are hoping the
state will chip in $30 million.
BUT UNIVERSITY President Harold
Shapiro isn't taking any chances. At a
Board of Regents meeting this summer
he said that if all other fund sources
failed administrators would have to get
the money from within the University.
That would mean coming up with
about $5 million in the short-term to
borrow the rest of the money at a time
when the University is already
struggling to cut $20 million from its
own budget.
"When the president says we don't
have any choice, if something goes
awry with our funding choices, we may
have to go to something else," Kennedy
said.

4

Top hats Daiy Photo by
No one wanted to be left out when the Michigan batsmen played in the Mid-
west regional tournament this summer.

Gays more involved in campus politics

FRE taPICK-UP r~

ty copies binding
nt passport photos

AND
DELIVERY
with
minimum

(Continued from Page 1)
Aaron said that Shapiro "expressed
concern for their cause" but was un-
decided on whether he should take the
issue to the University Regents for a
bylaw change or simply make a
presidential policy statement himself.
CONSIDERABLY WEAKER than a
bylaw change, a presidential policy
statement would not require the
University to extend its non-
discrimination policy to the outside
organizations it deals with, such as the
military or subcontractors working for
the University.
If the University changes its bylaws,
it would be forced to reconcile its prac-
tice of condemning gay discrimination
while still allowing on campus
organizations such as the military,
which openly discriminate against
homosexuals.
Problems with the military have
already developed at several law
schools that prohibit discrimination
against homosexuals and have banned
military recruiters from their cam-
puses.
IF THE UNIVERSITY changes its
bylaws it would risk losing about $5
million in defense department research
contracts because Pentagon officials
have threatened to withdraw grants
from universities than ban recruiters.
LaGROC's position on the military
issue, however, is that it is a civil rights
issue and is therefore "beyond cost-
benefit analysis," said Aaron.
Because military recruiters and con-
tractors currently discriminate on the
basis of sex and age, which the Univer-
sity already prohibits, their violation of

Although LGROC has spent con-
siderable time promoting a non-
discrimination policy for gays, mem-
bers say they are not expecting it to be
a panacea for their problems.
LIKE ANY FORM of discrimination,
a bias against homosexuals is a part of
peoples' attitudes, said Aaron. And at-
titudes are difficult to change, he said.,
Although a bylaw would not eliminate
all the discrimination on campus, it
would tell students that they should be
more sensitive to others' lifestyles,
Aaron said.
THE BYLAW CHANGE would give
the message that "it's o.k. to be who
you are, it's o.k. for other people to be
who they are and we (the University)
are not goingto treat you any differen-
tly. The fact that people have to hide
their sexual orientation is reason
enough to change the bylaws," he ad-
ded.
In a free intellectual community like
the University, Aaron said, it is
"awful" that such discrimination
exists. "It is hard enough growing up,'
he said.
But for gays and lesbians it is even
harder because we do not receive any
reinforcement for our identity.
Heterosexuals hear songs on the radio
expressing their feelings, they see
billboards and television reinforcing
their own views, Aaron said.
Gays have to "fake it", Aaron said,
they have no successful, visible role
models such as openly gay professors
that they can look towards. Thus, many
remain closeted for life unable to ex-
press their own identity in a socially
acceptable manner.

5

I

1(313) 761-4539

J

As part of a more politically active stature, local gays turned out in force this
summer for rallies during Gay Pride Week.

a gay discrimination clause could also
be ignored, LaGROC member Jonothan
Ellis said.
ELLIS, said the group received no
response from Shapiro since their April
meeting.
The problem with'getting the Univer-
sity to adopt a policy against gay

discrimination is that all the groups in
the Regents' non-discrimination
policy are also protected by state and
federal laws, Aaron said. Because state
and federal laws do not protect
homosexuals, the University is not
legally required to include such protec-
tion, he said.

./

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