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September 15, 1983 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

t

Army to
F ermit
women.
t o wear
, arrin s
WASHINGTON (AP) - The U.S..
Amny, reluctantly marching in step
with fashion, has decided that women in
fiuiorm can wear earrings - as long as
hey're not gaudy and "fit snugly
gainst the ear."
Since the 1970s, women in the ranks
jve filed "numerous requests" for
permission to wear the jewelry on duty,
accprding to an Army spokesman. The
change in regulation was ordered last
month, after lengthy study by the Ar-
y's Uniform Board.
THE NEW directive was praised
ysterday by some women working at
the Pentagon.
I like it," said Spec. 5 Dannette
HAle, who was not wearing earrings,
but who said she wears them once or
twice a week.
Spec. 4 Ane Thomson, wearing a tiny
biearl on each ear, agreed.
"IT'S ABOUT time. I think I look bet-
Er with earrings, anyway. They're
'Not everyone was happy. One
colonel, who declined to be indentified
because "it's Army policy now and
we've got to follow it," he said.
"It's not like the old days. You sort of
vonder what's coming next."
ACTUALLY, the move brings the
Army into line with;the Air Force and
Navy, which have permitted earrings
for several years.
Like women of the other armed for-
es, the Army's 75,000 women must
-wear earrings that meet strict
specifications.
A Army spokesman, quoting from
regulations to be published in an up-
dated uniform manual, said the only
accedptable earrings will be "spherical
and unadorned, not to exceed one-
quarter inch in diameter." They must
be2made of either gold, silver or pearl,
which eliminates costume baubles. The
,wery must "fit snugly against the
r "
ONLY ONE per ear, the Army added.
the jewelry may be worn with either
te full-dress uniform or the everyday
service greens, but not with fatigues.

The Michigan Daily - Thurs
School board to i
to students' test s

CHICAGO (AP) - A suburban school
board whose district has been called an
"academic graveyard" is planning to
withhold merit pay from ad-
ministrators unless their students start
showing progress.
"We'll rate the superintendent, prin-
cipals and other top administrators -
give them report cards, if you will - on
progress of pupil's scores and decide if
they are worth merit pay," board
President Thelma Demonbreun said
yesterday. "We think administrators
are responsible for the academic
climate of their buildings."
GARY MARX, associate executive
director of the American Association of
School Administrators, said he knows
of no other district in the country tht
has an administrators' salary program
linked directly to pupils' scores on
national, standardized tests.
Dozens of school districts, however,
plan to experiment with merit pay in
some form for teachers, and Dallas
schools recently adopted a plan
providing bonuses for teachers in
schools where test scores are higher
than expected.
But the West Harvey Elementary
School District south of Chicago is pin-,
ning responsibility at the top, and its
first move last July was to hire a new
superintendent, 41-year-old Edward

Smith, formerly an assistant at
Dowagiac.
"I LIKE THE new policy," Smith
said. "It changes the old concept of
academic custodian to instructional
leader. We will work closer with the
teachers and have contact with studen-
ts. Such leadership is a realistic ap-
proach to the problem."
Smith said, "It's difficult to talk
about an excellent administration when
they are presiding over . . . an
academic graveyard . . . The board
rejected that concept as being
illogical."
Linda Randle, mother of five children
who attend Garfield School in the
district, said basing salary increases on
scores "is a marvelous idea, but I am
for credibility. It has to work through
the parent, teacher, and the ad-
ministrator.
THE ACADEMIC level in the district
of 2,500 pupils "has been one of the
lowest in the whole Chicago area for
years and parents are very concer-
ned," Randle said. "We lose a lot of
good teachers because they are
frustrated and leave. And other schools
rip off our good teachers.'
Most of the pupils come from low-
income families.
Last year's results of the California
Test of Basic Skills showed only kin-

day, September 15, 1983=--Page 9
ink pay;
cores
dergarten pupils reaching national
average. The scores of pupils in the fife
th through eighth grades averaged 214
years behind the national average in
reading and mathematics.
SMITH DESCRIBED the California
Test of Basic Skills as a widely used
exam to help school districts measure
the performance of their students.
Under the West Harvey plan, which
takes effect a year from now, the board
set as a first-year goal raising reading
and math scores for kindergarten
through fourth-graders to the national
average. For the second year the goal is
to raise all pupil scores to the national
average.
If these objectives are not met, an
nual merit pay would be cut by 20 per
cent. It would be reduced by 30 percent
the following year if there is little or no
progress.
The policy affects the superintendent,
six principals and five other ad-
ministrators. Principals received
$26,000 to $31,000 a year. Smith, who is
paid $45,000 said the amount of merit
pay varied from year to year dependin-
g on district finances.
Leon Hendricks, principal of King
Elementary School in the district, said
the policy "is a form of merit pay and
means we will get recognized for the
work we are doing, and give us another
incentive to do more."

AP Photo,

Derailed
An inspector reviews the wrecked cars of a
yesterday after it rammed a train which
crewmen were killed in the collision.

train outside Sullivan,. Indiana
had stalled ahead of it. Two

Fund raiser drops Planned

WASHINGTON (AP) - Planned
Parenthood was dropped yesterday
from the federal government's annual
employee charity drive in a ruling the
group charged was motivated by
hostility to its pro-abortion activity.
Donald Devine, director of the Office
of Personnel Management, ruled that
Planned Parenthood failed to meet cer-
tain financial and accounting
requirements to receive donations from
the * $100 million Combined Federal
Campaign.
"THE DECISION was based upon
Planned Parenthood's 'failure to com-
ply with financial and-accounting stan-
dards required by OPM regulations,"
the agency said in a statement. "Plan-
fled Parenthood's application was not
sufficiently candid and complete to
begin conformance with the applicable
rules."

'(Devine) has made no secret of his hos
to the activities of Planned Parenthood
-Faye Watt
President of Pla
Paren

But Faye Wattleton, president of
Planned Parenthood Federation of
America, accused Devine of basing his
decision on his publicly stated op-
position to abortion.
"Mr. Devine has made no secret of
his hostility to the activities of Planned
Parenthood," Wattleton said. "It is this
hostility and not any of the various so-
called technical issues that are at the

root of his decision."
DEVINE'S ruling cam
three days of hearings earli
th at which anti-aborti
presented evidence tha
Parenthood was ineligib
ticipate in the campaign,
Tapscott, a spokesman for
nel office.
The decision means thatf
ployees cannot donate mon
ned Parenthood through the
Planned Parenthood, whic
abortion rights and famil3
has been receiving about
year from the Combined Fe
paign, which receives dona

Parenthood
million federal employees nationwide,
Tapscott said. Planned Parenthood has
participated in the fund-raising drive
stility ic 8.
since 1968.
TAPSCOTT contended Devine's
decision was not motivated by his op-
le ton, position to abortion.
inned "Precisely because he feels so inten-
sely about abortion, he planned and did
thood bend over backwards to ensure that
Planned Parenthood's rights were
respected in every possible way" at the
f w hearings, Tapscott said.
e m- otfollowng The decision was based on "whether
risn gro- or not the sources of Planned Paten
on groups thood's funding met the requirements
t Planned of the CFC," Tapscott said.
)le, to par- THE CAMPAIGN requires that no
said Mark more than 20 percent of an-
the person- organizations budget can come from
the federal government and no less
federal em- than 50 percent may be from members
ney to Plan- of the general public, he said.
campaign. Last year, Devine rejected requests
,ch promotes by anti-abortion groups to remove
ty planning, Planned Parenthood from the fund
$800,000 a drive. He overruled a recommendation
sderal Cam- by the campaign's eligibility commit-
tions from 4 tee to drop Planned Parenthood.

INDIVIDUAL THE TREE
Z 5th Ave or Liberty 741.0700
$2.00 WED. SAT. SUN. SHOWS BEFORE6PM
ENDS TONIGHTI
"EASY MONEY" (R) AT 7:30, 9:40
STARTS FRI.
LIMITED 7 DAY ENGAGEMENT
FROM THE
DIRECTOR OF
"BREAKER MORANT"
AND
"TENDER MERCIES"
BRUCE BERESFORD'S
S A UNIVERSAL CLASSIC
FRI. 7:10, 9:10
"AN ENGROSSING
ROMANTIC MYSTERY"
Judith Christ
GERARDDEPARDIEU
AND
NATHALLE BAYE IN .. .
TTHE RETURN OF
MARTIN GUERRE
THURS., FRI. 7:25, 9:30

A

Aecused gduard w
A Wells Fargo guard accused of stealing $7 million in the
second largest robbery in U.S. history was not registered as
i1 armored car employee as required by state law, state
ice said yesterday.
Victor M. Gerena, 25, remained the object of a nationwide
hunt as police inspected his abandoned car and interviewed
two other guards he disarmed at gunpoint, bound, gagged,
and allegedly drugged at a company terminal late Monday
Ieiore disappearing with the loot in all denominations.
But blood tests showed no evidence of drugs in Timothy R.
Gerard, 21, of Tolland and James McKeown, 25, or Hartford,
who said they were injected with a sleeping potion by Gerena
before he loaded his rented car with the money.
W WELLS FARGO has offered a $35,000 reward for the part-
me guard who earned less that $5 an hour and was to have
been married Friday. Authorities ordered watches on airpor-
ts and national borders.
F State police spokesman John McLeod said Gerena was
reegistered with Wells Fargo's Guard Service but was fired
from that division in Jan., 1983.
Gerena was rehired by the firm's Armored Service office
io West Hartford - where he staged the robbery Monday
right - but there were no records of the company's request
to have him certified, McLeod said.

as llegally hired
Wells Fargo Guard Services and Wells Fargo Armored
Service are both divisions of Baker Industries, but have
separate quarters and operate independently.
McLEOD SAID the firm could have its license suspended
or revoked as a result of the apparent violation, but noted no
company has ever lost its license for failing to register an
employee.
Robert A. Guerin, president of Wells Fargo Armored Ser-
vice Corp. in Atlanta, GA., Wednesday refused comment on
Gerena's employment history or on the reasons why he was
fired from the Guard Service division.
A spokesman for Gerena's family and fiance said they
were "shocked and baffled" by his actions.
"The family is dumbfounded and at a total loss to explain
this, except to think that here's a guy who handles millions of
dollars and maybe breaks," said family attorney Michael J.
Graham.
"If Victor chooses to surrender, he should call my office
and we will arrange to have him turn himself in in the most
safe way possible so that no one gets hurt and under the most
favorable conditions we can negotiate," Graham said.
Gerena, who is divorced, was to be married Friday to Ann
Elizabeth Soto, 20. Graham said he believes police are cer-
tain Miss Soto, who lived with her fiance, knew nothing about
his plans.

NOON LUNCHEON
Home-made soup & Sandwich $1
September 16
DEAN JAMES CROWFOOT,
School of Natural Resources
"The challenges of downsizing the University

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