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September 15, 1983 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-15

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ARTS
The Michigan Daily Thursday, September 15, 1983 Page 7

On cheap eats

&

other construction

E VERYBODY EATS. But
some people eat better than,
others.
How so? you may ask. The
discriminating art of gastronomic
etiquette lies not only in
mastication (how you chew) and
content(what you chew), but also
in location (where you chew).
Students of higher education at this
institution have long endeavored to
master the three cardinal com-
ponents - some with admirable
success, others with dribbling
failure.
You can't fault Ann Arbor; this
town boasts a phlegm-filled miasm
of fine food establishments, com-
plete with utterly and variably
tasteful decor. Why, there's

everything from creative moder-
nist brickwork to exquisite 1950s
soda fountain counters to
imaginative art deco trimmings.
You don't have to eat at South
Quad.
On the other hand, it's a rare un-
dergrad who can shell out for
Escoffier shellfish every night. So
it helps to know your way around
the cheap eats, and right up there
in importance is at least a passing
knowledge of fast food architec-
ture and design.
What to watch out for? Look for
the little things - is the lighting
warm and inviting or cold and for-
bidding? How's the color coor-
dination? Look for big things - is
there continuity between food and
frame? Is the architecture suited
to its purpose? Finally, look for the
undefinable - does the place look
nice? Remember, the grease
doesn't slide equally on all spoons;
look around, decide what you like,
but don't be afraid to forage into
the unknown. You may be sur-
prised.
Here's some high and lowlights
of local eatery construction, selec-
ted with minimal discretion:
McDonalds (337 Maynard). First
stop is under the arches. Ac-
tually, the famed golden spans are
absent from this version of Ray
Kroc's dream (courtesy of local
zoning restrictions), but there's a
splendid stained glass "M" win-
dow in its place. Opened in 1975,
this is a big place - capacity is
about 200 people. The architects
managed to retain a feeling of
spaciousness, aided by ample
natural lighting, especially on the
upper level.
The brickwork is remarkable,
considering. Clothed in innocuous
orange-brown, the various colum-
ns are well-removed from street
traffic, creating a more comfor-
table seclusion. The design has
captured both the 1976 Honor
Award from the Michigan Society
of Architects and the 1978 "M"

Award from the Masonry Institute
of Michigan. If you must consume
animal fats, this is a pleasant, con-
sumer guide pit stop.
Krazy Jim's (551 S. Division).
Happily located at the 3-way inter-
section of Maynard, Division, and
Packard, Krazy Jim's has been
grilling 245,760 combinations of
Blimpy Burgers for over two
decades. No surprise then that the
place reeks of old-time college (the
ventilation system, however, is
fine). The six indoor tables and
window counter are set in olive
(some would say putrid) green;
add the incredible swivel chairs
with the kid-sized wrought iron
backs and you've got a friendly
time lapse back to the days when
linoleum was king. And they grind
their own meat in the back, too.
Taco Bell (615 E. University).
The storefront that prompted a
minor populist rebellion last year.
From the pink false adobe to the
arching Spanish windows, a gaudy
display of consumer-oriented ar-
chitecture. The style is perfect -
just far enough from the original to
be safe (the only southwestern
structures I know with bells are
churches), just close enough to be
obnoxious.
Pico Deli (1106 S. University).
Literally sandwiched between
Ulrich's Electronics and Norman-
die Flowers, Pico is a triumph of
Liliputian box design. Not tall, not
wide, but narrow - so much you
can see clear to the back entrance
without straining. The redwood
storefront with the circular win-
dow opens into a minimalist
customer area. There are three
stools and just enough counter to
support the napkins.
Well-suited for high turnover.
Get the Oriental lunch box (a meal
at under $3) and get going. Perfect
name: "pico" means "one-
trillionth."
Le Dog (410 E. Liberty). Central
campus' only wiener booth is a
strange-looking place. A free-
standing wood box framed with a
fire engine red crown, the peaks
capped with bubble lights. Utterly
un-French, considering the name.
Also notable: Drake's (709 N.
University) has those great age-
old wooden booths and an old
fashioned candy store layout com-
plete with jelly bears. Raja Rani
(400 S. Division), though not a fast
food stop, deserves mention for its
brilliant white gables and pretty
herb garden. Burger King (520 E.
Liberty), besiildes the unusual
sunken format (a trip into the
womb, as one local expert
described it), must also be listed
for equity.
Printed notes: Equity's a fine
thing, when you can get it. Your
chance to critique fast food ar-
chitecture - or any other
marginally pertinent topic -
comes via postage. Write in!
Printed Matters will be a reg-
ular weekly feature on the Daily
arts page.

Matt "uitar" Murphy brings his instrument of choice to Rick's this
weekend.
Blues brother

Opens Today
STARVING ARTISTS
SALE
all items $15 or less
Here is a chance to purchase an inexpensive piece of art, produced
by a local artist, to decorate your room. Photographs, drawings,
small paintings, and more.
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday
Sept. 15-17 from 12 noon to 6 p.m.
CANTERBURY LOFT - 332 S. State St.
second floor, two doors south of Nickels Arcade
THE
UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES
CENTER
UAC
IS ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR THE POSITION OF
VICE-PRESIDENT OF:
PROGRAMMING
APPLICANTS MUST HAVE
EXPERIENCE
APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE
UAC OFFICES SECOND FLOOR OF THE UNION
APPLICATIONS ARE DUE BY
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 16 , 1983
QUALIFIED APPLICANTS WILL BE CONTACTED
FOR INTERVIEWS
FOR MORE INFO CALL UAC 763-1107

By Mike Cramer
I F YOU'VE BEEN at the University
for a while, you know this; if you
haven't, you'll figure it out soon
enough: a lot of big name musicians
play Ann Arbor. One such big name will
perform at Rick's American Cafe (611
Church St.) Friday and Saturday
nights.
This is a guy who's been compared to
great guitarists, ranging from B.B.
King to Jimi Hendrix. He's played and
recorded with most of the biggest
names in blues, including Muddy
Waters, Willy Dixon, Otis Rush, Mem-
phis Slim, and Sonny Boy Williamson.
His superb guitar work on Memphis
Slim's "Steppin' Out" inspired a young
Eric Clapton to record the same song

with John Mayall's Bluesbreakers.
His name is Matt "Guitar" Murphy,
and as you can probably tell from the
credits (raves) presented above, he is
very highly respected in the music in-
dustry. Even so, he wasn't all that well
known publicly until 1979, when John
Belushi asked him to join the Blues
Brothers. He played on the Blues
Brothers' million-selling albums, and on
their hits "Gimme Some Lovin' " and
"Soul Man." In The Blues Brothers'
Movie, he played Aretha Franklin's
husband, a diner proprietor persuaded
by Belushi and Aykroyd to re-enter the
business of blues.
Matt "Guitar" Murphy has played
Rick's several times before, and he's
been met with loads of enthusiasm from
Bluesloving Ann Arborites. This
weekend should be no different.

Records

Fonzi Thornton - 'The
Leader' (RCA)
THE LEADER, Fonzi Thornton's solo
album, is a record of pleasant dance
grooves which feature an all-star cast
of guest musicians. Fonzi, a veteran
session singer who has often worked
with Chic, has a good enough sense of
humor to make a potentially boring
album at least a bit fun. He opens The
Leader with a chorus of voices singing
the letters of his name in football
stadium style, and follows that title
song with a funky rendition of Phil
Spector's classic "Be My Baby." As if
this weren't enough, he appears on the
album cover in a "Happy Days" Fonzi
outfit and pose. The best cuts are
"Beverly," the failed first single,
"There Goes My Heart," which sports a
patented Kashif synth line, and "Per-
fect Love," which features a whistling
part and some novel Rodgers and Ed-
wards rhythm work.

The Whipers -
Love' (Solar)

'Love For

Dance
Theatre
Studio
7T1 N. University, Ann ArborMI 48104

Ever since Dick Griffely resurrected
The Whipers in the late '70s they've
been consistently turning out distin-
ctive, tasteful pop-funk singles like
"This Kind Of Lovin,' " "And The Beat
Goes On," and "It's a Love Thing." The
new "Keep On Lovin' Me" upholds and
upgrades the tradition, serving as the
masculine counterpart to Gladys
Knight's "Save The Overtime For Me,"
both bearing the Sylvers' distinctive
production stamp. The rest of Love
For Love is strong, if unspectacular,
led by the dreamy midtempo "Keep
Your Love Around" and the sweetly
sexy "Do They Turn You On."
"Tonight" was already a top five hit as
well. If you don't get the LP, at least go
for the "Keep on Lovin' Me" single, it's
one of the best you'll year.
- Leizer Goldsmith

For a current schedule of these and other classes call 995-4242

Happy birthday to Bach from Ars Musica

By Laura Pedersen
OU DON'T have to like cake and
ice cream to enjoy the birthday
celebration for Johan Sebastian Bach.
Ars Musica, the Baroque orchestra,
begins their three-year celebration of
the Tricentennial of Bach's birth
(1685) when they inaugurate their new
season Friday, September 16.
To start the birthday celebration, the
classical ensemble will perform Bach's

larger instrumental works and many of
his chamber pieces during the excep-
tional three-year fest.
As Jason Eyster, executive director
of Ars Musica, recently proclaimed,
"Bach combined the pomp and the pop
in a way that has never been equaled."
In addition to the birthday "party,"
Ars Musica (which performs with in-
struments modeled after those used
during the Baroque period), will also
present early classical works by
Mozart, Beethoven, and Haydn in their

exciting fire-part concert series.
The first concert, which begins at 8
p.m., includes such popular pieces as
Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and Trio No. 1
for Forte-piano, Violin, and Violincello,
both by Mozart.
It's not every day that one gets the
opportunity to listen to the mellow and
exciting tones of some of the masters of
music - let alone be able to listen to
them in their original form (or close to
it). Don't miss your chance to enjoy the
classical notes of Ars Musica. All Ars

Musica performances are held at
Bethlehem Church (423 S. Fourth
Ave.). For further information call 662-
3976.

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