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September 15, 1983 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-15

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The Michigan Daily- Thursday, September 15, 1983 - Page

Soviets plan to modernize

~EuropeaE
BRUSSELS, Belgium (AP) - The
Soviet Union is rapidly modernizing its
battlefield nuclear forces in East bloc
countries, adding new artillery and
deploying new SS-21 rockets at a rate of
four a month, NATO sources said
yesterday.
The SS-21, with a range of 75 miles, is
a mobile surface-to-surface missile
which replaces Frog-7 missiles with
about half the range, the sources said.
THE SOVIET UNION .is distributing
new nuclear-capable artillery to its for-
ces in Eastern Europe, including about
150 artillery pieces' in East Germany,
said the sources, quoting a new NATO
report; and speaking on condition they
not be identified.
The report was part of 'an intelligence
update given this week at a meeting in
London of senior nuclear affairs
specialists from most of the 16 North
Atlantic Treaty Organization nations.
The' sourses said it was based on
satellite observations and other in-
telligence-gathering means, which
were not described.
THE SOVIET UNION this year
threatened to deploy nuclear weapons
in Eastern Europe if NATO goes ahead
with plans to put 572 new Pershing 2 and
cruise missiles.in Western Europe stat-

nuclear

forces

ting in December.
The Soviets also are building three
new bases for mobile SS-20 nuclear
missiles to be targeted on Western
Europe while negotiating with the
United States for reductions on both .
sides, Pentagon sources in Washington
say.
The sources, who requested
anonymity, said the bases will be able
to house 27 missiles, each with three
warheads. Currently, the Soviet Union
has 243 of these missiles aimed at
Western Europe and another 108
targeted on Asia.
DEFENSE SECRETARY Caspar
Weinberger charged last spring that
the Soviets have had nuclear warheads
in East bloc countries for many years:
The NATO report provides the details,
the sources in Brussels said.
The report said the Soviet Union has
about 4,000 nuclear warheads in East
bloc countries. This does not include
nuclear forces in the European military
districts of the Soviet Union itself,
which also are targeted on Western
Europe.
The number of nuclear-capable air-
craft deployed in Eastern Europe has
remained constant at about 1,600 over
the past five years, the report said. The

estimated number of nuclear bombs
stockpiled for use by these planes was
not given by the sources.
THE QUALITY of the force has in-
creased, however due to the introduc-
tion of newer, more capable aircraft,"
the report said.
Among them, the study listed the su-
24 Fencer, a 1,120-mile range all-
weather bomber said to be integrated
into Soviet, East German, Polish and
Hungarian forces.
The sources said U.S. intelligence
gatherers, who supplied the infor-
mation forsthe report, believe the
weapons listed in- the study have
nuclear charges.
The report comes at a time of
growing pressure on NATO to justify
the need for nuclear weapons in Europe
like the Pershing 2 and cruise missiles
scheduled for deployment in West
Germany, Britain and Italy this year.
These are longer range rockets
designed to counter 3,125-mile range
Soviet SS-20 missiles, which are not in-
cluded in the report since they are all
reported to be in the Soviet Union itself.

Petition drive pushes for
cuts in U.S. aid to Israel

HA'PPENINGS
Highlight
A raucus evening with Queen Ida and the Bon Temps Zydeco Band begins
at 8 p.m. tonight in the Union Ballroom. Sponsored by the Ark and the Office
of Major Events, Zydeco (Cajun for Boogie Down) will perform a mixture of
traditional Cajun music, reggae, calypso, Dixieland blues, rock and Latin
music. Ark sponsors say the band's performance last year "brought the raf-
ters down."
Films
Ann Arbor Film Co-Op - A Boy and His Dog, 7 & 10:20 p.m., Village of the
Damned, 8:40 p.m., Aud.'A, Angell.
Classic Film Theatre - Looking For Mr. Goodbar, 7:05 p.m., American
Gigolo, 9:30p.m., Michigan Theatre.
Cinema Guild - Citizen Kane, 7 & 9:20 p.m., Lorch.
Mediatrics - Straw Dogs, 7 p.m., Cool Hand Luke, 9 p.m., Nat. Sc .
Performances

(Continued from Pae 1)
MENDENHALL said he consulted
with City Councilman Jeff Epton (D-
Third Ward) and has his support. He also
said Epton advised them against their
original plan of adding the proposal as
an amendment to the city charter. Sin-
ce the proposal is not an amendment, the
city council must vote to place the
amendment on the ballot. Epton could
not be reached for comment.
Councilman Richard Deem (R-
Second Ward) opposes the petition.
"City council has enough to do within
the city, it's not the responsibility of
people of Ann Arbor to judge what hap-
pends in the Mid-East any more than it
is to judge the Mayor of Istanbul," he
said.
(LAST MAY Councilman Lowell
Peterson (D-First Ward) sponsored a
resolution to censor the Turkish gover-
nment for its treatment of the mayor of

Qualifications: Proficiency in at least one, preferably two, of the
following area: Math, For. Language, Econ., Social and Natural
Sciences, English, Engineering
Job Description: Tutoring/instructing in a classroom setting with
5-10 students. 9 hours/week all term
Salary: $7.50 per hour

'il

McGree Theatre - play, "To Be Young, Gifted And Black," 8 p.m., 115 E.
Pierson.
Eclipse - jamnsession, 9: 31p.r.,A Livet sity Club, Union
Speakers
Chemistry - Abbie Gentry, "Molecular Dynamics of Impurities in Solids,"
4 p.m., 1200 Chem.
Computing Center - chalk talk with consulting staff, "Structure and Use
of MTS Files," 12:10 p.m., 1011 NUBS; Forrest Hartman, "Intro to $Accoun-
ting," 3:30 p.m., 165 BSAD; Bob Blue, "Intro to MTS I," 7 p.m., 2235 Angell.
Rackham; English; Offices of Vice Presidents for Res. & Academic Af-
fairs - Hugh Kenner, "Pound & Homer," 4 p.m. Rackham Amphitheatre.
Center for Japanese Studies - John Campbell, "Irasshaimase!" noon,
Lane Hall Commons Rm.
Engin. - Mike Liu, "On Distributed Processing & Local Networking," 4
p.m., Rm. 1078 E. Engin.
Michigan Alliance for Disarmament - Rev. Peter Doughtery speaking on
his experiences in Nicaragua, 7:30 p.m., Union.
Black Law Students' Alliance - Genna Rae McNeil, expert on historical
and contemporary developments in civil rights law, 4 p.m., 116 Hutchins.
William Clements Library -.John Dann, "Adventures in Acquisition," 8
p.m., William Clements Library.
Meetings
Sailing Club -7:45 p.m., 311 W. Engin.
Med. Ctr. Bible Study -12:30 p.m., F2230 Mott Children's Hosp.
Regents -1 p.m., Regents Rm., Fleming Bldg.
Ann Arbor Libertarian League - 7 p.m., basement of Dominick's, 812
Monroe.
Mich. Alliance for Disarmament - 7:30 p.m., Union.
Mobilization for Animals - 7 p.m., Ann Arbor Public Library, 343 S. Fifth
Ave.
Miscellaneous
Scottish Country Dancers - beginning class, 7 p.m., intermediate class, 8
p.m., Forest Hills Community Center, 2351 Shadowood St.
Students Wood & Crafts Shop- advanced power tools safety class, 6 p.m.,
537 SAB.
Michigan Gay Undergrads - bake sale, 8 a.m. to noon, Fishbowl.
Musical Society - usher sign-up, 2 to 5 p.m. and 6:30 to 9 p.m., Hill Aud.
box office; choral union auditions, 655-3717 for appt.
Canterbury Loft.- Starving Artists Sale, noon to 6 p.m., 332 South State.

x

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