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September 10, 1983 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-10

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The Michigan Daily - Saturday, September 10, 1983 -Page 3
Higher ed.panel named

By CHERYL BAACKF
Gov. James Blanchard's recently
named higher education commission
will begin "forging a new relationship"
between Michigan's colleges and un-
iversities, its economic development
needs, and job training, said state
Board of Education President
Gumecindo Salas yesterday.
The 27-member commission,
scheduled to meet for the first time Sep-
tember 19, includes representatives
from labor, business, and industry and
several community leaders. Blanchard
has asked the group to assess what
roles Michigan's higher education
system should play in the state's
economic recovery.
UNIVERSITY administrators say it
is still too early to tell whether the
commission's final report, due in by the
end of next March, will result in
significant changes for the higher
education system.
"It's a little difficult to tell whether
the commission will be able to accom-
plish anything," said Richard Kennedy,
University vice president for state
relations. "It's premature to decide
whether anything good, bad, or indif-
ferent will come out of it."
The new commissioners are still busy
delegating responsibility and charting
a plan of action, said committee chair-
man James Robinson, formerly a U.S.
district attorney. He said the com-
mission hopes to analyze resources
available to the schools and provide ac-
curate projections of future enrollmen-
ts.
EVEN BEFORE Blanchard selected
the commission members, the group
w1

was plagued by conflicting claims on its
authority. Last month, state Board of
Education officials questioned whether
the governor had the constitutional
right to establish such a commission,
suggesting that they should exercise
such a function.
Since .then, the issue has been
resolved to the mutual satisfaction of
everyone, said Eugene Paslov, deputy
superintendent of public instruction.
Under the agreement, both president
Salas and State Superintendent Phillip
Runkel have been named to the panel
and reports from the commission will
go to both the board and the governor.
Paslov said the problems were minor
and that such confusion can be expec-
ted when dealing with Michigan's
higher education system.
"WHEN YOU start fooling around
with higher education in the state, you
automatically run into some
problems," Paslov said. He said trying
to establish a central committee can be
touchy because each college and
university has its own governing board
and a strong sense of autonomy.
"You have a lot of players, all of
whom have a clear sense of respon-
sibility (about what happens in the

system)," he said.
However, he said some centralization
is inevitable because the state school
board and government also have a
clear responsibility for planning and
coordination of the system.
SALAS SAID universities and
colleges should not fear losing their
autonomy. He said the commission wag
created to study the system, not govern
it. Vice President Kennedy concurred
with that assessment.
Paslov said reaction to the com:
mission has been good. "It is m$
opinion that establishing a commissior
on a short-term basis can be a very ef-
fective device," he said. "(It) bringg
things to the front burner and gets
people to pay attention to an importan
issue."
"Higher education has a tremendous
role to play in the development of
Michigan's economy," said Philip
Power, commission member and
chairman of the board of Suburban
Communications Corp. in Ann Arbor.
"One of Michigan's greatest assets in
economic development is the quality 6f
the higher education system."
He said research-oriented univer
sities play a key role in development.:
U~

Daily Photo by BRIAN MASCK
Clap happy
Revelers party down to the music of SLK at the first all-campus party of the year in the Mudbowl last night.

Bankrupt
NEWPORT, Ore. (AP) - The 5,000
students in Lincoln County began a for-
ced vacation yesterday three days into
the school year, because the district ran
out of money and residents refused to
vote for more funds.
Three hundred teachers were laid off,
:high school seniors fretted about their
chances of getting into college, and
parents flooded the state Department of
Education office with calls asking what
to do next.
"WE'RE TELLING them to hang in
there until the next vote," said Jan
Ryan, an assistant state superintendent
of public instruction.
If the levy request fails when it is out
to voters again on Sept. 20, "We're
telling them they should seriously think
:about putting their children in private
schools or other alternatives."
Teachers and students planned
demonstrations to protest the closure,
and along with parents on Thursday
formed a group called Keep Improving

Oregon schools close

District Schools.
GROUP MEMBERS planned a mar-
ch at the state capitol on Wednesday to
coincide with the start of a special
session of the Legislature. Schools in
this tourist-oriented coastal county
closed Thursday, two days after voters
rejected a district operating levy for
the fourth time this year.
Students can attend schools in other
districts, but must pay tuition.
"I don't have money," said Deborah
Ames Drago, a senior at Taft High, one
of the district's five high schools. "My
family doesn't have money. You can't
get college financial aid without being
in school."
"I'M STUNNED," said Newport
High School senior Mike Gaumer. "You
spend all of your life complaining
about school and then you have to com-
plain when it is not opening."
In Oregon, most school operations at
dependent on property taxes. The state
provides about 30 percent of the

operating costs, but a state attorney
general's opinion issued in 1977 says
Orelon law does not allow the state to
bail out one district.
Ed Sheleney, who owns a grocery
story in the small town of Rose Lodge,
said he and his wife, Betty, voted
against the levy and plan to do again
Sept. 20.
HE SAID THE district was trying to
"blackmail" voters by closing the
schools after the levy defeat and was
"using the kids as a leverage to pass a
budget."
The schools should have to do without
an operating levy if it fails after two
elections, said Sheleney, contending the
district was top-heavy with ad-
ministrators and that there is an effort
under way to recall school board mem-
bers.
"If they can't get their act together
after two elections, they're never going
to," he said.
Tourism is a major industry in the
county and there are many retired
residents. The vast majority of voters
are not parents of school-age children.
"It's kind of depressing," said Cindy
Martin, 15. "My brother is a senior and
now my parents are trying to find out
where they can send him to school.
We're caught in the middle. It's hard on
us.

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14

University gets Dow
'dioxin research grant

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By JACKIE YOUNG
University researchers will begin
work this fall on developing rapid and
inexpensive methods of removing
chemicals from Michigan's wastewater
through a $250,000 grant from Dow
Chemical Co.
University chemical engineering
professors Jerome Schultz and H.S.
Fogler will co-direct the project which
is part of a $3 million Dow program to
develop technology for removing trace
amounts of dioxin found in wastewater.
Chemical engineering Prof. Erodogan
Gulari also will work on the project.
ONE METHOD the researchers will
use involves passing toxic liquids
through a bed of clay-like materials.
This would enable the researchers to
determine how clay can be improved to
absorb more dioxin, Schultz said.
A second method will use micro-

organisms to increase the absorption
capacity of the clay particles by
separating small amounts of the
chemicals out of the water and into the
clay, Fogler said.
Wastewater treatment plants curren-
tly break down compounds in this way,
but do not effectively absorb low levels
of possibly toxic compounds existing in
liquids.
ABOUT 10 University faculty mem-
bers, undergraduates, and graduate
students will work on the project.
Fogler even said that some students
called him up over the summer to
volunteer for the project.
Preliminary results of the study will
be released in about 18 months, Fogler
said.
This story was reprinted from the
summer edition of the Daily.

DETROIT AREA 3RD
PHOTO FLEA MARKET
& TRADE SHOW
Live Model Photo Session
New-Used Photo Equipment
Buy-Sell-Trade - FREE APPRAISALS
minw Sat., Sept. 10, 10 am-5 pm
50C E Sun., Sept. 11, 10 am-4 pm
DEARBORN CIVIC CENTER
Discount With (corner of Greenfield)
-=hisAdM 15801 M1 Ave., Dearborn
313/884-2242

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Mon-Thurs 9-12, Fri-Sat 9-1, Sun 8-12

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-HAPPENINGS
Highlight
One-man-folk-show artist Michael Cooney will strut his stuff tonight at the
Ark starting at 8 p.m. Cooney's unique performance includes his rendition of
folk tunes on the banjo, guitar, concertina, and 12-string guitar. Doors open
at 7:30.
Speaker
Institute of continuing Legal Education -.Robben W. Fleming, "Recent
Major Labor Decisions of the Court and the National Labor Relations
Board," 9a.m., Rm. 116, Hutchins Hall.
Film
Cinema Guild - Picnic at Hanging Rock, 7 & 9:05 p.m., Lorch.
Performance
Performance Network - September Dances, 8 p.m., 408 W. Washington.
Meetings
Ann Arbor Go Club - 2 p.m., 1433 Mason Hall.
Tae Kwon Do Club - practice meeting, 9 a.m., CCRB Martial Arts Room.
Grav Panthers - 3 p.m., Ann Arbor Firehouse Community room.

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