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September 08, 1983 - Image 18

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-09-08

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I

Page 8-A -The Michigan Daily, Thursday, September 8, 1983
THE ANN ARBOR CANTATA SINGERS
BRADLEY BLOOM, Conductor
Announces the Auditions for the
198384 Season

Engineers pay for new computers

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By MIKE WESTON
Staring this fall, engineering students will have
unlimited access to their own computer system-a
privilege that carries a price tag of $100 a term.
Under the plan, students will put up $1.1 million in
annual fees added on to their tuition to help pay for
the new system.
IN THE NEXT two years the college expects to
spend -$10 million to install the system, according to
Engineering Dean James Duderstadt.
Student fees will pay for $2.2 million of that figure
with the remainder coming from donations, loans,
and the college's general fund.
Duderstadt said the college needs its own computer
network because the University's Michigan Terminal.
System (MTS) does not offer enough equipment or
computer time to meet engineering demand.
DUDERSTADT said the new Computer Aided
Engineering Network (CAEN) will be a great im-
provement over MTS because of its speed, graphics
ability, and capacity to communicate between depar-
tments.
But students who don't expect to use the system
much, view the $100 fee as an unfair burden.
"Since Engin. 102, I've had only two or three com-
puter assignments," said Mechanical Engineering

'Since Engin. 102, I've had only
two or three computer
assignments. . I've used
maybe $35 (worth of computer
time) on MTS, and now they
want me to pay $100 per term.'
-Anthony Searing,
an engineering senior
Senior Anthony Searing. "I've used maybe $35 (worth)
of computer time) on MTS, and now they want me to
pay $100 per term."
LING YANG, a senior in engineering sciences said.
"I never use the computer - it's not fair."
Duderstadt said the system is needed because
engineering students will increasingly use computers
in their work. For the time being, the college plans to
install 400 to 500 computers, but the number may
eventually run into the thousands, Duderstadt said.
Unlike the MTS, each machine will be a self-

contained computer, not a terminal hooked up to a
system shared by many users.
THE EQUIPMENT will have varying capabilities
- the college is now looking at the Apollo Domain for
its more powerful computers, and the Apple Lisa, and
the IBM personal computer for less complicated
work, according to Daniel Atkins, the college's
associate dean for research.
By fall, the college expects to have about 200 com-
puters installed. Work stations will be located in
the Dow Building, the Chrysler Center, and the East
Engineering building.
While some schools have forced students to buy
their own computer equipment, Duderstadt said he
hopes the college's system will save students money.
"INSTEAD OF investing in a personal computer,
the college will ask its students to pay the computer .
user fee each term to support a vastly more
sophisticated computing environment," he said.
While a student would probably have to buy a com-
puter at full price, the college expects to get
significant discounts on the equipment, Duderstadt
said.
Already some of the system has been donated - a
powerful $350,000 computer from the Harris Cor-
poration of Melbourne, Fla.

Regents'vote blocks fight to restrict research

(Continued from Page 1)
Last spring, the Progressive Students
Network, a group of students affiliated
with MSA, planned laboratory sit-ins
prior to a vote on the guidelines. But the
group backed off the idea fearing it
might raise sympathy for researchers
by making them appear persecuted.
ROWLAND, A MEMBER of the
group, said actions like the sit-ins would
not be coordinated by MSA.
The -proposed guidelines received

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overwhelming support from the
University: many students actively
supported them, the faculty senate
voted for them 2-1, and the ad-
ministration asked that they be adop-
ted.
So when the Regents- refused, Herb
Hildebrandt, head of the faculty senate
said he felt like he had been "run over
by a steamroller."
Hildebrandt described faculty mem-
bers as "quiet but unhappy" with the
decision, and said he did not think that
now is the time to "badger the' Regen-
ts" with another proposal.
AN ALTERNATE approach may be
to write a faculty senate resolution on
non-classified research similar to the
failed guidelines, said Medical School
Prof. Donald Rucknagel. Although the
resolution would not be binding because
it would not come before the Regents,
"We want it understood that these are
764-0558 -

the values that ought to be embraced,"
he said.
Another action for the fall may be
opening up discussion with faculty
doing DoD sponsored research and
trying to persuade them that their
research can indeed incapacitate
human beings.
"There might be some gentle
pressure, colleague to colleague. That
may be more effective than the
legislative approach," Rucknagel said.
ONE DIFFICULTY in establishing
guidelines for non-classifed research,
Rucknagel conceded, is deciding which
projects are essentially basic in nature
and which have close applications to
weapons.
"Where do you draw the line?" said
Roach. "They're yelling about, radar
research which guides things, it doesn't
kill anybody."
Buttdefense research critics point out
that the radar mapping project, by
Geology Prof. Philip Jackson, is the
type of technology used to guide the
Cruise missile. Jackson agrees that his
work can be used for such guidance,
but he says it has many civilian uses as
well. For example, remote areas such
as the Amazon River Basin could never
have been mapped without the type of
radar technology Jackson works on.
ENGINEERING PROF. Thomas
Senior, one of the University's top
recipients of DoD funds, uses similar
arguments to defend his work, which
critics say has appllications to the
Stealth Bomber and for "hardening"
airplanes to protect delicate equipment
from a nuclear blast.
Rucknagel contends that although the
research does have civilian ap-
plications, the Defense Department is
not sponsoring the projects for their
peaceful uses.
In the abscence of. any guidelines,
Rucknagel said he will probably con-
tinue to point to the restrictions on

classified research, which were adop-
ted during the Vietnam War when the
University was one of the top recipients
of Pentagon dollars.
Yet even if critics continue to use the
guidelines as a standard, there is no
way of enforcing them. While classified
research proposals go before a review
panel to decide whether the projects
conform, non-classified projects do not
face similar scrutiny.
Although no proposal has ever been
rejected under the classified research
guidelines, the number of projects has
significantly declined since they were
adopted. Much of the decline came,
from the University's divestment of its
Willow Run laboratories in 1972.
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