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January 14, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-01-14

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4

Page 2-Friday, January 14, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Supreme Court rules
Milliken may aid Riley

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports

LANSING (UPI) - The Michigan
Supreme Court yesterday ruled
Milliken may come to the aid of his em-
battled appointee, Justice Dorothy
Comstock Riley, in the suit seeking her
ouster from that body.
In a terse, one paragraph order, the
court granted Milliken permission to
file a brief "amicus curiae" as a legal
"friend" of Riley.
MILLIKEN has until 3 p.m. Jan. 21 to
deliver the brief.
Riley did not participate in the order,
which was unanimously supported by
the other six justices.
Gov. James Blanchard - who wants
Riley off the court - could not im-
mediately be reached for comment on.
the decision.
BUT THE Blanchard administration
is known to be closely studying the
possibility of filing its own "amicus"
brief in the case. One administration of-
ficial- said such a move now seems

likely.
Riley, a Michigan Court of Appeals
judge, was named to the high court less
than a month before Milliken left office.
He appointed her to fill a vacancy left
by the death of Justice Blair Moody.
Milliken is fighting more than. one
battle to protect his eleventh-hour ap-
pointees. Attorney General Frank
Kelley said yesterday the Senate can
still reject the former governor's last
minute appointments and that Blan-
chard has the power to withdraw them.
KELLEY, A Democrat, issued the
opinion at the request of Senate
Democratic Leader William Faust
who battled with the lame duck Milliken
over the appointments issue during the
final weeks of the last legislative
session.
Faust sought to limit the number of
appointments made by the Republican
Milliken in the closing days of his ad-
ministration.

Review gets little feedback
(Continued from Page 1)
Art school Dean George Bayliss, who had to go through this wrenching ex-
said Wednesday he thought a cut of perience ... It has damaged morale
-even 10 percent would be "punishing" and recruiting," he said.
for the school, yesterday said the Bayliss did, however, praise the
review has been a "traumatic ex- review committee itself. "The way it
perience" for the school. was done by those who had to do it was
"I REGRET very much that we have as conscientious and thorough a job as
could be asked for. I don't think they
missed a trick," he said.,
_C nThroughout the review, all members
of the art school community worked
together, Bayliss said. "There was a
RIAH great feeling of solidarity. . . I think
the students and faculty were very for-
EIbr9-3 thcoming, very staunch, and very help-
ful."
WHEN
WANDA
TALKS
EVERYBODY
LISTENS!
Starring
VERONICA HART

U.N. offers to host summit
between U.S. and Soviets
UNITED NATIONS - The United Nations would be happy to provide the
necessary "shelter" for a U.S.-Soviet summit, Secretary-General Javier
Perez de Cuellar said on the eve of his meeting with President Reagan today.
Perez de Cuellar said yesterday that he "would be quite ready to offer
facilities" if Reagan raised the question of a summit during their White
House session.
The secretary-general said Wednesday that the United Nations also would
be "the ideal forum" for broadened Arab-Israeli talks, with his staff possibly
acting as a catalyst to blend various peace plans already on the table
Perez de Cuellar said he planned to discuss with Reagan or with
Secretary of State George Shultz his proposal for a meeting of the 15-nation
Security Council "at the highest possible level" to, among other thngs, give
impetus to the groundswell of public support for disarmament.
Joint Chiefs not told about cut
WASHINGTON - The Joint Chiefs of Staff were not consulted before Pres-
ident Reagan decided to cut proposed military spending for next year, Gen.
Charles Gabriel said yesterday. The Pentagon said later the Joint Chiefs
supported Reagan on the question anyway.
Gabriel, Air Force chief of staff, told reporters at a breakfast meeting that
"The part that bothers us most in the military is the personnel pay cuts."
He was referring to a freeze on any fiscal 1984 pay increases for the 2.1
million men and women in uniform. the freeze decision, backed by budget
director David Stockman, was reported earlier this week by sources in the
Pentagon and elsewhere in the administraton, but has not been
acknowledged by the White House.
Gabriel suggested it will be harder to attract qualified volunteers for
military service if pay is allowed to lag as it did in the late 1970s with what he
called "disastrous" results.
"We were not consulted in the way the cuts were made," he said, adding
that the service chiefs would have been willing to trade some procurement;
funds for a military pay increase.
Eniergy tax options considered
WASHINGTON - The Reagan Administration is considering a broad-based
tax on energy consumption as an option for raising $40 billion or more in
fiscal 1986 if it is needed to reduce the government's swollen deficits, ad-
ministration sources said yesterday.
The sources said energy taxes are high on Treasury Secretary Donald
Regan's list of possible revenue sources that would "trigger in," if
required, after Oct. 1, 1985, to keep the government's red ink below $100
billion.
President Reagan is expected to make a decision soon on several con-
tingency tax options recommended by Regan Wednesday. The president
must submit his proposed budget for fiscal 1984, which begins next fall, to
Congress by the end of this month.
The anonymous sources said Regan had several variations of energy taxes
and income tax surcharges in mind, including a fee on imported oil; a tax
that could be extended to domestic oil as well as imports; a so-called BTU
(British thermal unit) tax that sets levies based on the heat content of
various fuels; and a "windfall profits" tax or a severance tax on natural gas
that would be tied to removal of federal price controls in 1985.

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AP Photo
Fatal tanker explosion
Volunteer firemen in Front Royal, Va., battle flames fueld by 8,900 gallons of
gasoline spilled from an overturned Exxon tanker truck. According to state
police, the truck went over an embankment on Interstate-66 yesterday
before exploding into flames, killing the driver.
Israel and Lebanon accept
U.S. compromise on talks

(Continued from Page 1)
proposal for concurrent negotiations on
all the issues, but each demanded
changes. Agreement finally came at
the sixth meeting after Philip Habib,
Reagan's chief Middle East envoy,
arrived from Washington with word
that the president was growing im-
patient and wanted an end to the
deadlock.
President Reagan has proposed a
Palestinian entity, not a state, on the
Israeli-occupied West Bank under Jor-
danian administration. Israel has
rejected the proposal.
Meanwhile in Moscow, Palestine

Liberation Organization chief Yasser
Arafat said Soviet leader Yuri An-
dropov had agreed during their talks
Wednesday to support PLO
negotiations with Jordan.
ARAFAT SAID the Soviet approval ex-
tended to a possible Palestinian-
Jordanian confederation.
Arafat contrasted Andropov's sup-
port with the actions of the United
States, which the guerrilla leader said
does not want a Middle East set-
tlement.
Criticizing the currentaLebanese-
Israeli negotiations, Arafat said they
were "worse even than the Camp David
deal. With the full blessing of the United
States, Tel Aviv imposed results on the
negotiations even before they started."
ARAFAT, COMMENTING on his
meeting Wednesday with Andropov,
said he had encountered "full under-
standing" of his three-day talks with
Jordan's King Hussein before flying to
Moscow.

1:

NAT. SCI. AUD.

6:45, 8:30, 10:15
Sunday, January 16

18 admitted

COMPUTER
TECHNOLOGY
IT'S ONLY
AS GOODAS THE
STATE OF THE ARTIST

Claims for jols benef its up
WASHINGTON - Some 550,000 Americans applied for unemployment
benefits in the last week of 1982, a spurt of 35,000 over the previous week and
a reversal of the short decline that had heartened some economists.
The Labor Department reported yesterday that for the first time in five
weeks, there also was a rise in the insured unemployment rate - the propor-
tion of the 111 million-member U.S. labor force drawing jobless relief
checks. It climbed from 4.9 percent to 5.0 percent in the week ending Jan. 1.
Some private economists had cited a trend of declining applications for
unemployment benefits in recent weeks as signaling a peaking of
joblessness, which stood at 10.8 percent in December, the highest since 1940.
The department's Employment and Training Administration'said,
however, the total number of jobless workers drawing regular unem-
ployment benefits under state-run programs rose by 13,000 to 4,338,000 in
the week ending Christmas day. following a sharp decline of 168,000 the
previous week.
.Chamber rejects Reagan's
'Hire one worker' proposal
WASHINGTON - The new chairman of U.S. Chamber of Commerce yester-
day brushed aside President Reagan's appeal for each business to hire one
unemployed worker, saying "It is probably a good idea - but nothing more
than a good idea."
"This gives the press something to chortle about," Thompson said of the
Reagan appeal. His remarks came in a get-acquainted session with repor-
ters.
During a Dec. 23 press briefing at the White House, Reagan was asked
what he planned to do about the post-Depression record 10.8 percent unem-
ployment, which has left some 12 million Americans out of work. II
"I know that there are some businesses that, themselves, are faced with
troubles and cannot do this," Reagan said. "But there must be others that
could probably take even more than one."
Presidential counselor Edwin Meese had said in December, when Reagan
first broached the idea, that the hiring program was one begun by the Rev.
Leon Sullivan, founder of a job training program called Opportunities In-
dustrialization Center in Philadelphia.
Vol. XCIII, No.85
Friday, January 14, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription dates: $7.50 in Ann Arbor; $8 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY 4.20 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
bor, MI. 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
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dicate and Field Enterprises Newspaper Syndicate.
News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 763-0375.; Circulation,
764-0558; Classified Advertising, 764-0554; Billing, 764-0550.
Mike Bradley. Joe Chapelle, Laura Clark. Dan Coven.

t Standard Oil
Company of California,
we view our data
processing people as
innovators, dedicated
to the art of technological application.
We know that maintaining state-of-the-art
technology depends on self-motivated
individuals striving for excellence, not merely
functioning as trained technicians. They come
from many fields of expertise, including
engineering, science, business administration
and computer science. Each contributes a
special insight or talent for organization,
communication and problem solving that
improves and

training and the
support needed to
advance quickly to
increasingly respon-
sible assignments. Our
horizons are expanding so quickly that, today,
talented people can reach high technical or
management levels faster than ever before.
That is the state of the computer profes-
sional at Standard Oil Company of California.
Computer Services operates in four loca-
tions in the San Francisco Bay Area: San Francisco
(Corporate Headquarters), Richmond (East
Bay), Concord (near Mt. Diablo), and in the
San Ramon Valley, our newest facility (still
under construction)

maintains our intricate
information network.
When you step
on board with our
Computer Services
Department, you will
immediately be
assigned to a project,

WE'LL BE
ON YOUR CAMPUS
JANUARY 31-
FEBRUARY 4.

offering attractive and
convenient housing
nearby
We think that our
computer technology
offers a stimulat-
ing and rewarding
environment, and

Editor-in-chief.
Managing Editor
News Editor ..
Student Affairs Editor
University Editor
Opinion Pogo Editors

Arts Magazine Editor -
Associate Arts Magazine Editor
Sports Editor
Associate Sports Editors
Photography Editor
ARTISTS Norm Christinsen
Stewart

DAVID MEYER
PAMELA KRAMER
ANDREW CHAPMAN
ANN MARIE FAZIO
MARK GINDIN
JULIE HINDS
CHARLES THOMSON
RICHARD CAMPBELL
.,BEN TICHO
BOB WOJNOWSKI
BARB BARKER
LARRY FREED
JOHN KERR
RON POLLACK
BRIAN MASCK
Pete Sinclair. Jon

Richard Demak, Jim Davis, Jim Dworman, Tom Ehr.
Joe Ewing Paul Heigren. Steve Hunter. Chuck Jaffe,
Robin Kopilnick, Doug Levy. Tim Mokinen, Mike
McGraw. Larry Mishkin. Lisa Noferi, Rob Pollard. Dan
Price. Jeff Quicksilver. Paul Resnick, Wendy Rocha,
Lenny Rosenb, um. Scott Salowich. John Toyer. Judy
Walton, Karl Wheatley. Chock Whitman, Rich Wiener,
BUSINESS MANAGER ............ JOSEPH G. BRODA
SALES MANAGER ............ KATHRYN HENDRICK
DISPLAY MANAGER.................ANN SACHAR
OPERATIONS/ NATIONAL
MANAGER ..................... LINDSAY BRAY
FINANCE MANAGER............SAM SLAUGHTER
CLASSIFIEDS MANAGER ..............PAM GILLERY
ASSISTANT DISPLAY
MANAGER .................... PAMELA GOULD

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