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April 15, 1983 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-04-15

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ARTS

Page 6

Friday, April 15, 1983

The Michigan Daily

I

THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
WAY TO GET
FAST RESULTS
CALL 764-0557

2 concertsf
There will be two concerts of interest
to Ann Arborites this coming week.First
of all, Los Angeles' Wall of Voodoo will
be headlining at the Second Chance
Wednesday the 20th, with special guests
to be announced. Wall of Voodoo are
one of the most unexpected bands to be
receiving (just) radio airplay with their
zany tune, "Mexican Radio." Hope

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or fnals un
they'll do their version of Johnny
Cash's "Ring of Fire," too! Tickets are
$9.50, and the show begins at 9:30 p.m.
Secondly, The Misfits will be making
a rare appearance at the Michigan
Union Ballroom on Saturday, the 23rd,
with guests Negative Approach,
Ground Zero, and the State. This is an
all-ages admitted show, and it's sure to
be a "ghoul's night out." The show star-
ts at 9 p.m., and tickets are a measly $6.
-Larry Dean
PIANO
DROPOUTS
HOW TO PLAY THE PIANO
DESPITE YEARS OF LESSONS
Two years of testing have pro-
duced a new course in making music.
This course is based on an amazing
breakthrough in piano instruction,
and it is intended for people who can
at least read and ploy a simple mel-
ody line of notes.
This new technique teaches you
to unlock your natural ability to
make music. You will learn how to
take any melody and play it a variety
of ways: rock, folk, swing, jazz,
semi-classical, bolero.. . you name
it . . . just for the sheer joy of it! By
the end of this 8 lesson course, you
will know how to arrange and enrich
a song so that you won't need sheet
music or memorization. How well
you play depends upon how much
you practice, of course.
Come and experience this revo-
lutionary new way of bringing adults
back to the piano.
FREE DEMONSTRATION
Monday, April 25, 1983
from 7-8 p.m. in Room 2038
School of Music Building on
the North Campus of the
University of Michigan.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL
(313) 763-4321

I

l.+s' v vac, :.*. . ,a ura
OUNG RON Reagan, Jr. quit his I e r
job last year for a myriad of
reasons, none of which were substantial
enough to cause the abandonment by
the other 15 members of the Joffrey II
Dancers. The prestigious troupe glides
into Ann Arbor for a two-day
engagement at the Power Center on
April 19 and 20.
The troupe, created in 1969, won the
assistance of a Ford Foundation granta
to aid in the establishment of an ap-
prentice program. The goal was to
bridge the gap that existed between the
very advanced students at the Joffrey
school, and the professional company,
The Joffrey Ballet. The Joffrey Appren-
tice Company was born, originally un-
der the direction of Jonathan Watts.
A year later the name was changed to
The Joffrey II Dancers, and regular
performances were scheduled for the
company. The troupe has since

LO

I

ormance,
drawn from auditions throughout the
country. The individual must show he
or she has a smooth continuum of dance
rather than a flashy technical display of
talent. The chosen ones are expected
to have a great deal of dance experien-
ce and must be between seventeen and
twenty-three and a high school
graduate.
Like those in the parent company,
each Joffrey II member has a chance to
A

By Colnlp cn

JOFFREY II

bkwoo

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y25 Off
any Jostn gold rng.
See yowl- jiostecns representativ'e

4
5491

FRIDAY,
APRIL 15
East University

m 9 0AN
MORE T HAN A BOOKSTORE

11:00
to
4:00
VM Ms ecr

developed from an exclusive farm team
of promising advanced studen-
ts-training to be regular performers
as well as soloists in the parent com-
pany, as well as other professional
companies-into a unit that is not only
completely professional in stature, but
also favored with sixteen very per-
sonable and unusually talented dan-
cers.
The dancers currently tour under the
direction of former New York City
Opera dancer, Sally Brayley Bliss, and
a former soloist with the Joffrey Ballet,
Associate Director Maria Grandy. The
two women have done everything from
fund-raising to teaching to ad-
ministrating in order to keep alive the
company's philosophy that performan-
ce is an essential and valuable ex-
perience to dance training. The Joffrey
II exists as a wonderful vehicle for dan-

eis to experience the stage, feel the
essence of what it is, and to make them
work for an audience.
The dancers are trained in ballet
technique, modern, jazz, and contem-
porary style, including traditional
Japanese style and folk dancing. They
are fully capable of dancing from
discipline to discipline and grasp every
genre quite impressively. The scope of
their training is exemplified by the fact
that the company alumni are currently
and comfortably performing in not only
classical based companies, but also on
Broadway and in the Alvin Ailey, Mar-
tha Graham, and Twyla Tharp ensem-
bles.
They are also trained in the kinds of
things a classroom situation does not
allow. They are taught to cope with
touring and performing conditions of all
sorts. This includes coaching in adap-
tation of make-up, manner, and method
in the best and worst possible circum-
stances so as to create the best possible
image for the audience.
The eight men and eight women that
comprise the company are given
scholarships to the school after being

show off their artistry and finesse since
there is no corps de ballet, and dan-
cers who may be overlooked in one
number often appear as leads in the
next. As a result, the casting will be an-
nounced prior to each night's perfor-
mances of the Joffrey II in Ann Arbor.
Tuesday evenings program includes
Bermuda Blues; Monotones II,
Rothko Chapel and In Kazmidity.
Bermuda Blues contains five
movements. Who Reads Reviews, Lit-
tle Face, The Four of Us; Chocolate
Apricot and Make up your Mind are all,
danced to the music of "A different,
Kind of Blues."
Mon otones II is a pas de trois for
two men and a woman set to loudly
resounding, plaintive music. It is a dif-
ficult piece that unfolds from the purity
of line into an image of scattering and
reassembling, twisting and turning,
manipulation and submission. The
third piece on the Program, Rothko
Chapel, is a chillingly modernistic
piece created as a dance equivalent to
architectural structure based on the
forms of abstract-expressionism used
by painter Mark Rothko.
The final piece of Tuesday's
program, In Kazmidity, describes a
See JOFFREY II, Page 9

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Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104 (313) 662-3201

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*ORTEC Is@
FIND OUT MORE ABOUT YOUR
OPPORTUNITIES BY PARTICIPATING
IN EITHER SEMINAR ON
APRIL 21, RACKHAM AMPHITHEATER,
1:30 - 5 pm OR APRIL 22, MICHIGAN
UNION, KUENZAL ROOM, 8:30-12 noon
If you want to know how you may benefit from the Quest for
Technology program, come to a seminar on technology
transfer. Your questions will be answered by the director of
Control Data Corporation's Quest Services and by experienced
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