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January 13, 1983 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-01-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Nobel Laureate warns
against arms build up

-Thursday, January 13, 1983-Page 3
Six MSU
students
disciplined

By THOMAS MILLER
At no time in history has the threat of
world destruction been greater, and
people must act now to avert
catastrophe, Nobel Prize laureate
George Wald told a Rackham gathering
last night.
"The most important problem today
is how to keep the human race from
wiping itself out," Wald said in the
year's first University Activities Center
Viewpoint Lecture, entitled "Survival
in a Lethal Society."
Wald, who won the 1967 Nobel Prize
for medicine and physiology, told a
small but attentive audience that
although the problem is large, it is not
unsolvable, and that the heart of the
dilemma is the arms race.
"KILLING AND destruction are the
biggest business on earth," he said.
}"Last year alone, $550 billion was spent
on weapons.
"I think ours is the most brainwashed
public on Earth," Wald said in referen-
ce to nuclear disarmament.
Salt II and other limitation talks, he
said, deal only with limiting strategic
weapons or those bombs in the megaton

range. He said tactical weapons are
considered too small to be counted.
WALD SAID the bomb dropped on
Hiroshima would be considered a tac-
tical weapon, even though "it was
responsible for the deaths of 140,000
people."
Wald stressed that arms proliferation
was the major problem facing the
world today, but said that it was merely
one of many problems with a single
source: The Industrial Revolution.
"Two hundred years of the Industrial
Revolution have brought the human
race to the brink of self-extinction," he
said, commenting on the origin of the
nuclear threat.'
"EVERY NUCLEAR institution
produces Plutonium 239 as a by-
product," he said. "Not only is it one of
the most toxic substances known, it is
also the most convenient for bomb-
making."
Wald also cited the problem of
nuclear waste disposal. "No one in the
world knows how to deal with the
disposal," he said.

"The reality is we can't live with
nuclear power," he said. "Nuclear
power came out of nuclear weapons and
they remain two sides of the same
coin."
WALD ALSO cited pollution, over
population, the mechanization of
agriculture and unemployment as
problems which came from the In-
dustrial Revolution.
"What we're up against is this enor-
mous product of the Industrial
Revolution- unemployment. And no
human being is as helpless as a worker
in the city without a job," Wald said.
"The mechanization of agriculture
has driven people off the land. It's an
unforseen consequence of the Industrial
Revolution," he added.
Wald, however does not consider the
situation hopeless. "I don't think
there's anything inevitable," he said.
"These are social, economic, and
political problems. We all need to live
politically."
Wald emphasized that the problems
are not too complex for the masses to un-
derstand. He said the public must
become involved in order to head off the
''utter disaster of nuclear war."

for, rape
incitdent

Daily Photo by ELIZABETH SCOTT
Nobel Prize laureate George Wald warned against the nuclear ams race be-
fore a small audience in Rackham auditorium last night. Wald called the
arms race an immediate threat to the future of the human race.
Anti-nuke group pushes
proposal for spring ballot
(Continued from Page 1)

By KRISTIN STAPLETON
Six Michigan State University
students who were accused and then
acquitted of the rape of a fellow student
last fall face disciplinary measures
from the University, an MSU ad-
ministrator said yesterday.
Moses Turner, MSU's vice president
for university affairs, said action will
be taken against the students even
though criminal charges were
dismissed last month. "We always
reserve the right to take any action that
concerns the behavioronour campus,"
he said.
TURNER WOULD not elaborate on
the disciplinary steps the university
will take.
The incident occurred last Nov. 21. A
woman said she was invited to a party
by one of the men, but tried to leave
when she discovered she was the only
female present. She said seven men -y
one a Ferris State College student and
the rest from MSU - prevented her
from leaving and removed her clothes.
Then the woman said each of the men
raped her.
Charges against the seven were
dropped after a preliminary hearing in
December.
Two of the. students involved in the
incident., Marc Seay and David Duren
refused to comment on the university's
action. The other four could not be
reached for comment.
An appeal of the court decision is
pending.

Daily Photo by WENDY GOULD
Roger Kerson, military research coordinator for the Michigan Student Assembly, presents his views on military
research to the Engineering Council.
Engn students say research vital

By GEORGEA KOVANIS military projects conducted by Univer-

Many engineering students say sity engineers. Some say his review is
Roger Kerson, military research coor- blowing military research out of
dinator for the Michigan Student proportion.
Assembly, is not qualified to review And those students let Kerson have it
-H1APPENI NGS-
Films
Mediatrics - The Deer Hunter, 6 & 9 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Ann Arbor Film Co-Op-Little Big Man, 7 p.m., and Papillon, 9:30 p.m.,
Angell Hall, Aud. A.
Cinema Guild - Battle of Algiers, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Lorch.
Classic Film Theatre - Lolita, 7 & 9:45 p.m., Michigan Theatre.
Public Health - Changing Foods in Changing Times and Food Follies,
12:10 p.m., School of Pub. Health II.
International Center - The Toughest Job You'll Ever Love - The Peace
Corps, noon, International Center.
Performances
Mich. Union Arts Program - pianist Rebecca Happel, the Synohonic
Etudes by Schumann, 12:10 p.m., Pendleton Rm., Union.
Music at Michigan - pianist William Race, works by Schumann, Mozart,
Ravel, Brahms, Rachmaninoff, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Meetings
Ann Arbor Libertarian League - 7:30 p.m., basement of Dominick's, 812
Monroe.
Society of Women Engineers - 6:30 p.m., 311 W. Engin.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship -7 p.m., Union.
Med. Ctr. Bible Study - 12:30 p.m., Rm. F2230 Mott Children's Hospital.
Campus Crusade for Christ -7 p.m., 2003 Angell Hall.
Speakers
Urban Planning - Ken Polakowski, "Land Use Design," 11 a.m., 1040
Dana.
Vision - Daniel G. Green, "Flicker Characteristics of Toad Rods," 12:15
p.m., 2055MHRI.
LSA - Helen F. North, "The Intellectual Woman in Ancient Greek
Culture," 8p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
Japanese Studies - Kimi Coaldrake, "Koto: A Lecture-Demonstration,"
noon, 200 Lane Hall.
Campus Chapel - Archie Andrews and Leslie Thornton, "Issues on Cam-
pus - Racism," 7:30 p.m., 1236 Washtenaw Ct.
Center for Russian and East European Studies - Dr. Dine Spechler, "The
Bankrupt Successes of Eastern Europe and the Failure of Growth Policy,"
noon, Commons Room, Lane Hall.
Computing Center - Consulting staff, "MTS Command Language, Basic
Use," 12:10 p.m., 1011 NUBS; Forrest Hartman, "Intro to Messagesystem,"
3:30 p.m., 176 BSAD; Bob Blue, "Intro. to MTS, Basic Commands," 3 p.m.,
2235 Angell or 7 p.m., 131 BSAD.
Miscellaneous
School of Metaphysics - class on dreams, meditation, visualization, 209 N.
Ashley.
Student Wood & Crafts Shop - safety class, 537 SAB, Thompson St.

with both barrels last night when he ad-
dressed the Engineering Council at its
regular meeting.
"HE HAS no previous scientific
training," said Kevin O'Connor, a
senior in electrical engineering. O'Con-
nor said Kerson's report will hurt the
engineering program.
"You've done more damage trying to
stop this questionable research," he
accused the MSA researcher during a
question and answer session. Finan-
cially, O'Connor said, "It's hurting us
greatly."
Kerson last night denied the charges
leveled against him by the engineers,
saying his non-science background ac-
tually benefits his research more than a
strong foundation in engineering would.
"SCIENCE AND technology has such
an important impact on everyday life,
it's too important to be left to just scien-
tists," he said to the more than 30
students at the meeting.
Kerson is reviewing military resear-
ch in the engineering college, trying to
determine what, if any, projects should
be cut for ethical reasons. A University
See MILITARY, Page 7

Louis Velker (R-Fifth Ward), who
supported the Nuclear Freeze
resolution, said he is unsure of whether
he will support this proposal.
"That sounds like an empty
resolution to me," Velker said. "If we
are saying we are nuclear free just for
the sake of saying it, then we shouldn't."
"If a truck came through our city
limits with nuclear material on it the
police wouldn't enforce it (the
resolution)," he argued. "I don't know
what it's going to prove."
Other Republican council members
said although they don't question the
Police
notesK
Man with knife arrested
A 25-year-old man who threatened police
with a knife Tuesday morning is being
charged with possession of a deadly
weapon with intent to commit a felony,
Ann Arbor Police said yesterday.
Police said officers responding to a
family fight on the 900 block of Brown
St. Tuesday wee threatened when they
attempted to arrest a man for two out-
standing traffic violations. He is being
held in Washtenaw County Jail pending
his arraignment.
-Dan Grantham
764-0558
764-0558

good intentions behind the proposal,
they question its significance.
"In reading what the proposal states,
one could just pick it apart. I think it is
ill-advised," said Edward Hood (R-
Fourth Ward).
Mayor Louis Belcher said he would
not take a stand on the resolution until
he had met with fellow Republican
councilmembers this weekend to
discuss the proposal's ramifications.
"I don't jump on anything without
looking at it closely," Belcher said.
"Even the most noble causes can go
raw."

A TRIBUTE To THE LATE
DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.
WITH GUEST SPEAKERS
FORMER CONGRESSWOMAN SHIRLEY CHISOLM
DETROIT JUDGE MYRON H. WAHLS
PLACE: MENDELSSOHN THEATER
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
DATE: JANUARY 15
TIME: 7:00 PM
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT
CAMPUS INFORMATION: 763-4636
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