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April 10, 1983 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-04-10

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Right-to-life activists
plague abortion clinics

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, April 10, 1983-Page 7
Uprising in Warsaw
ghetto coimmemorated

WASHINGTON (AP)--Right-to-life
activists increased their sometimes
violent harassment of abortion clinics
last year, creating a "climate of
terrorism" that raises concern about
patients' safety, says a professional
association of doctors and abortion cen
.ters.
Thirty-three incidents of violence
against abortion clinics were reported
in 1982, including six firebombings and
the kidnapping of a doctor, according to
Uta Landy, executive director of the
National Abortion Federation.
IN ANN ARBOR, the Planned Paren-
thood offices on North Main have been
picketed and officials there say clients
have been harrassed.
Although she was unable to provide
specific figures for past years, Landy
said the 1982 count was the "highest
number that we have ever seen" and
that harassment of abortion clinics is
likely to increase this year.
"People are very concerned for their
own safety, as well as for the safety of
the women who are having abortions,"
she said in a recent interview.
JOE SCHEIDLER of the Pro-Life Ac-
tion Committee in Chicago says his
group has stepped up its efforts to
picket abortion clinics around the coun-
try and to discourage women from

having abortions. In fact, Scheidler
said he may help picket the federation's
annual meeting in New Orleans this
Week.
But he firmly denied his group had
been involved in any violence.
"We call it non-violent direct action,"
he said in a telephone interview. "If I'm
really committed to be pro-life, I would
never set fire to a clinic. Someone
might get hurt."
THE federation is determined to fight;
any type of harassment, which Landy
said has "created a certain kind of
climate of terrorism."
"I think we have grown prepared
enough and sophisticated enough to
fight violence in a very organized kind
of fashion," she said, citing her
organization's efforts to educate abor-
tion providers about countermeasures,
insurance and legal avenues to stop
right-to-life groups that overstep the
bounds of free speech.
Such countermeasures will
be one focus of the federation's annual
meeting, she said.
The NAF, founded in 1977, now has
250 members - including doctors,
counselors, abortion clinics and others
involved in providing abortion services.

WARSAW, Poland (AP) - Officials
laid wreaths at a monument yesterday
to open cermonies marking the 40th an-
niversary of the Jewish ghetto uprising
against the Nazis, but Poland's only
survivor of the struggle called the
ceremony "hypocritical" and stayed
away.
Marek Edelman, who at the end of
the uprising led dozens of Jews to safety
through ghetto sewers, wrote a public
letter condemning the ceremony -
which began a two-week, government-
sponsored commemoration - and
urged others to join his boycott.
"I WILL not take part in it and I will
not approve of somebody else's par-
ticipation, no matter where they come
from," Edelman, 62, wrote in the letter,
which was widely circulated in Poland.
When he was 22, Edelman helped
organize the ghetto rebellion in which
several hundred fighters armed with
smuggled and homemade weapons
resisted German tanks, artillery, and
infantry for 53 days beginning April 19,
1943. An estimated 65,000 Jews were
killed.
The state-organized commemoration
of the uprising, and Edelman's protest,
have sparked a controversy that has
reduced the number of foreign partic-
ipants from an expected 3,000 to about
1,300.
THE WORLD Congress of Jewry in
January endorsed the commemoration,
but there appeared to be no Jews, either
Polish or from abroad, at the ceremony

yesterday at the tomb of an unknown
soldier.
A delegation of 298 Israelis defied
local critics and said they would come
to Warsaw next week, when most of the
foreign visitors are due, for the main
ceremonies. The Israelis . included
Mayor Shlomo Lahat of Tel Aviv and
Stefan Grajek, one of a handful of
uprising survivors who live outside
Poland.
Yitzhak Arad, director of the Yad
Vashem Holocaust Memorial Institute,
said he hoped the group's attendance
would prevent Polish authorities from
presenting the rebellion as part of a
national resistance to the Nazis.
SOME OF THE organizers of the two-
week commemoration have said that
one reason for the ceremonies is to
weaken the anti-Jewish image of the
Polish government, which conducted
an anti-Semitic campaign in 1967-1968.
The government last month quietly
retired the man who was the chief of
security police during that campaign.
Officially, the government said Miec-
zyslaw Moczar, 69, retired from
another post because of his age.
To culminate the two-week program
of remembrance, Polish authorities
plan to open Warsaw's only synagogue,
which has been closed for years
because of disuse. The government
spent the equivalent of millions of
dollars to renovate the synagogue, but it
has been unable to attract a permanent
rabbi to serve Poland's estimated
15,000 Jews.

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Daily Photo by JEFF SCHRIER
Cold dog
'M' third baseman Chris Sabo's father and most loyal fan Heidi (in jacket)
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U' of icials blame lack of
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(Continued from Page 1)
sity must decide whether it is willing to
pay the way for top-quality minority
students who might not need the aid.
The University's present practice con-
centrates on providing money for
students based primarily on need.
"THE UNIVERSITY hasn't done the
research that needs to be done in order
to realize how to spend its money
(allocated for financial aid) intelligen-
tly," Doster said.
In response to a question, Doster said
that financial aid packages actually
improve for out-of-state students after
their first year.
"The University doesn't give out-of-
state students University money when
entering the University, but after the
first year they do," Doster said. "I
don't know why, but the amount of
money can really grow."
EXPLAINING that the University
expects students to contribute at least
$1,000 from summer earnings to expen-
ses, Acevedo complained that "more
than one-half the families have never
had $1,000 in savings at any time. Yet it
is expected by the University to come
in with what these families have never
seen."
Addressing the issue of minority
recruitment, Robinson said, "at this
University, there is not a tradition and
history of a lot of hard recruiting. It has
a long history of implementation -
helping people go through the
bureaucracy, the maze, the network, in
order to enroll here."
But once students get to campus,
Robinson said, the climate is hostile.
With so few minority students at the
University, many others say "it's not
for me," he said.
IN RESPONSE TO allegations that
the University only recruits from two
Detroit high schools, Robinson defen-
ded the overall efforts of the admissions
office. "Our efforts in proportion to the
number of students we get are far less
at Cass Tech and Renaissance High. We
wouldn't have to step, our foot in the
door and we'd get the same number of
students."
"We can go to (other schools), talk
ourselves blue in the face, and get
maybe two students," he said. "It just
turns out that the most eligible and
likely students come from those two
high schools."
Robinson said one possible solution is
to involve the University's School of
Education in the Detroit school system
to help build a qualified applicant pool.
"THE SCHOOL of Education could
relate itself to the quality of education
in the Detroit area by establishing
community networks and actually
provide some of the math, science, and
communication skill necessary for
survival at an institution like this," he
said.
All the speakers yesterday agreed
that the minorities already on campus
can best affect change by taking
responsibilities for themselves.

Sharon Jordan, an academic coun-
selor in the Opportunity Program said,
"It is time for us to stop being
patronized. It is time for people to stop
saying 'What can we do for you?' We
have to say 'What can I do with my ex-
perience, with my culture? How can I
be more open and address some of the
negative issues (facing me in
society)?'''
ONE STUDENT remarked that con-
fidence building is crucial to improving
the atmosphere for minority students
on campus. "Once you build confiden-
ce, then you start moving forward.
When it starts within the black com-
munity, you'll see results.
Psychology Prof. Raphael Ezekiel
said, "It's bullshit to ask about what the
University will do. You have your own
lives. The issue is what you are going to
do with your life."
Ezekiel acknowledged the purpose of
the black and women's movements, but
said that "outside the contexts of these
institutions, you have to create your
own institution and in that, you find
your dignity.
Forum coordinator Jodie Levy said
she wished the audience. had been
larger, but that if "a few people get
something out of it," it's worth it.
MSA Vice President for Minority Af-
fairs Rick Jones added, "You expect a
low student turnout. I'm glad to see
LSA-SG do this; it shows their in-
terest," he said.

CHICAGO (AP) - Rep. Harold
Washington blamed defecting machine
Democrats yesterday for injecting
racism into his mayoral battle with
Republican Bernard Epton, and at-
tacked them as a "certain hard group
of men who have raped this city like
vultures."
The 60-year-old congressman, cam-
paigning to become Chicago's first
black mayor in Tuesday's election, said
at a downtown prayer breakfast that
unspecified Democrats "are the people
who are injecting this whole business of
race.
"IT'S NOT the so-called racists,"
Washington said. "It's the greed mer-
IOU Wins top
MSA seats
(Continued from Page 1)
would have given MSA's vice president
for minority affairs a greater role in the
assembly's leadership failed to capture
the three-fifths vote needed. The
measure, which received 2406 of 3416
votes, would have elevated the vice
president to a spot on the MSA steering
'committee, which reviews issues and
recommends actions before they are
brought before the entire student
assembly.
A proposal to hike student gover-
nment fees for all the schools and
colleges by 25 cents per term failed 1436
to 2227.
The results came after two days of
delay because of difficulties with the
computer tabulation system.
Mechanical problems with the com-
puter scanner, sloppily printed ballots,
and a discrepancy in a part of the com-
puter program slowed down the
tabulation process, said Bob Zahm, an
engineering college junior who wrote
the program and operated the com-
puter.

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chants."
Washington, who recently 'has been on
the defensive over his tax troubles and
unpaid bills, aimed his remarks un-
mistakably at former followers of
Mayor Jane Byrne who now support
Epton, a millionaire insurance lawyer
and former Illinois state legislator.
On Friday, Washington blamed a
campaign leaflet that falsely accused
Washington of being a child molester on
some members of the mayor's police
bodyguards.
WASHINGTON TIED his financial
problems to the anti-machine theme
that won him a surprisingly sizable vote
among anti-City Hall "lakefront
liberals" in the Feb. 22 primary, in
which the white vote split between Byr-
ne and State's Attorney Richard Daley.

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