100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 08, 1983 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ninety-Three Years
of
Editorial Freedom

e~ir iau

1 atiQ

Survivable
Partly cloudy with a high around 50.

Vol. XCIII, No. 149 Copyright 1983, The Michigan Daily Ann Arbor, Michigan - Friday, April 8, 1983 Ten Cents Ten Pages
Frye under fire: Students stage sit-in

MSA still
waits for.
election
* results
By LAURIE DELATER
In this year's Michigan Student;
Assembly election, the computer won.
Results of the election still were!
unknown last night because of a com-
puter back-up, forcing anxious can-
didates to wait just one more day for
the results.
The election results weren't expected
until early this morning, officials said.
But, most candidates weren't too up-
set by the delay..
"THE WAIT was rather frustrating,
but with finals at the Law School I'm
too busy to worry about results," said
Jamie Zimmerman, an independent
candidate.
The actual cause of the delay was un-
See MSA, Page 3

Group demands more
open review process

By JIM SPARKS
Thirty-five students spent last night
in the administration building after a
sit-in in which they demanded more
democracy in the University's
"smaller-but-better" plan.
Frye discussed the review
process at yesterday's Campus
Meet the Press. See story, Page
5.
The students, most of them in the
Progressive Students Network, walked
up the back stairs of the building at
about 1:30 p.m. and sat in front of the
office of Provost Billy Frye, the ar-
chitect of the plan to cut and
redistribute $20 million.
WHEN FRYE who is also vice
president for academic affairs came in
about 10 minutes later, he calmly sat
down and ate yogurt as they chargd
that his budget process is too secretive
and not open to new ideas.
"The process begins with you and
ends with you . . ., we believe that

autocratic decision-making has no
place in the University," said LEA
freshwoman Naomi Braine.
The group demanded a new, more
representative body to set University
priorities; no further cuts over 10 per-
cent until such a body is established;
an end to closed meetings of budget
review panels; a statement of why cer-
tain schools are picked to be cut; and
that the University take no legal or
disciplinary action against the
protesters.
"WE ARE determined to remain
here .. until these demands are met"
said LSA freshwoman Valerie Flapan.
It was, however, rumored that the
group would leave today at noon.
Frye talked to the group for abut two
and a half hours, but refused to grant
any of the demands. "We're not going
to make those kinds of decisions or
agreements on demand," he said.
The group did come prepared with
some granola, crackers, and fruit, but
University officials would not allow a
shipment of food in last night.
See GROUP, Page 5

Daily Photo by SCOTT ZOLTON
Progressive Student Network (PSN) members Tom Marx (Deft), Naomi Braines (center), and Valerie Flapan (right),
question Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Provost Billy Frye during a sit-in at his office yesterday as other mem
hers of PSN look on.

. .... ........... ...... r..... ."...n .. .......................... ,.:. .v. . . . . . . . . ...... .............................,.r ....... ..:........v....,..... . ..h...a}v,.. ..-a.
... .... ..........:i ..: .. .. ... ... .. ... ................. ...................... ....... , .n*.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... n h":".". r;a
.. l ......n. nv ..........n ......... ...... ... . ......:....................... . . * .......*n...... ..........n, ..h..h."..{}"n.. :i .a .h*. . . .: .. . .
.. ...}................:..........*....................::..............................,.... ...............r'c......... n...........h.. ?.... .:.\ .., ...:;.... ,.......... . .,{n... t.
China's ban doesn' worry'U

By HALLE CZECHOWSKI
with wire reports
The announcement by the Chinese government
that it will suspend cultural and athletic exchanges
with the United States probably won't affect the
University exchange programs, said officials at the
Center for Chinese Studies.
Albert Feuerweker, director of the center, said
although he had not read the statement by the
Chinese government he felt that academic programs
will not be affected. "The academic exchanges and
the cultural exchanges are two different programs,"
he said.
THE SUSPENSION was announced yesterday af-
ter the United States granted political asylum to a 19-
year-old professional tennis player.
Hu Na defected nine months ago during a tennis
tournament in California. Hu said she defected
because she feared prosecution because she had

resisted pressure to join the Chinese Communist Par-
ty.
MANY OBSERVERS said that the Chinese would
retaliate carefully, limiting the fallout to nonessen-
tial sports and cultural exchanges.
According to Feuerweker there are hundreds of
visiting Chinese scholars at the University, but there
are as few as six University students in China.
He added that he felt the issue could become "a
tempest in the teapot" for the University.
MANY OBSERVERS believe China has made the
Hu case a test of U.S. commitment to good relations.
The decision to suspend all further contacts under a
two-year-old cultural exchange agreement was an-
nounced by the Ministry of Culture, which accused
the United States of purposely manufacturing "a
serious political incident" to set back Sino-U.S.
relations.
A similar move was later announced by the Sports
Federation, which said the granting of asylum to its
star tennis player had "impaired the normal at-

mosphere in sports'exchanges between China and the
U.S."
THE CANCELLED events included a summer tour
by the Julliard String Quartet, a U.S. film week,
trips, an exchange of visits by the directors of Peking
Radio and The Voice of America, and several sports
tournaments.
"Hu Na is just the latest in a series of problems,
minor issues in themselves, which taken together
amount to something more, especially in light of
overall bad relations," said one foreign diplomat.
If China thought progress was being made in the
problem of U.S. arms sales to Taiwan, diplomats
said, then Hu would not be such a thorn, But China
says the United States is not honoring a commitment
to reduce arms sales to the rival Nationalist island.
Moreover, said the diplomats, who requested
anonymity, China's complaints about U.S. textile
quotas, limited imports of high technology and a
railway bonds default judgment against China would
not be exaggerated.

.r.-:.r :. :.......,.....,-.; . ......... ..:. ..: ..: ": :: .....:::............:::.v-:.vv:.v ^:: ":: ":::: n"::::::::r:".:v:::::::::::::::.v::.v::.v::: n":: n":::. : n"::.v::: r::::::::::.v::.v::::::: n"::::::._:::.v:.v::.v :::._::::::-:::: , :: rr:::.v::-.v::"v:.......... ..................................................:.. ........ ......... .. .... .,t..;...:: ::r-".::.:::-:::. :::. ::.: :.r.:: : at"+
... ........ .: r....... ..~. ......,...........,..,...,..+.........n ............................................................................................ .......... ... ..... ... .. nor: rv{v .r4., .. ::: }:: ""::::::::::::vY~J"{" n ". 4r .'rrr
, . ..... nr. .. r..:.. .,. rn4... r. .. ... ..r.. ..4 .......... ... ...... ....k. .. ... .......... .. .... tYn, ~r}r..: r..
..... . .".C}......,r.....r...:.., ...........,............r.r., ................... ...................."....... ........... ............,...{..n . ... .. ... .... .: }}r. r . ':"YR{y; .:{t :"?:"?:.ir,}'"" ..1. n: ". . .: .4 n. .:.....Yrn .. ..... ................... . ..... ..n .............................................,.....
.. .n........v. .... Fr .,.. \. ..... .....,"... v. .. .. ..
4"x:: ).{4t:. ::1. ". ."{C.?tt fiYY :i:v}''+,'.r' vf.~i:'n$'r
..... X .... n,,.. ..... ..r.. n .. v ........... ........... ...,.........,.+.,... ....,. ... .....,........................ .... ................. r............. ................. . ....... v.....>..... rr ...:.{{{.. .. .r r. r .
r... ........v ... .v .... ..v .......................... v....... ... ..., rv...... ...v.. r... , ......... ...... :.. nv.?,. 'ti ....n. .. }:.i::. :" i?}': .. .n fh .v..r ...t......,..:. , n4...r....... ,...........titi .........., ................ r. ... ... .. ..
..... $ .... .. ..... ..r :... .... r. ., ... n .r.. ... ... ."... .. ...', .. .. .. r}.. .... .. .... r.......... r...r .. r. ,..... .. ....., .. .n.. 4. }. ".4.. 4{vNOUN
....-.... r.. ... ..+ .... ...... ..., . ..,^.. ..{" ..vr.... r.... r. ....s .... .. ...r .. ....., v. .n .. ..... .n . ...r .... r .... ... ......... n... ...v....... ........................... ... t.... ... ... .... .. ... ..
. . ,.. ....,... ,.:....n ..x .....,.r..... ,{... .,...: .... r......... n,..r .. ...... ... ...........,............ ....... ............................,........... .................~............. .. . .."r.. }r.. .. k : a . .. . . r".. : ,v:; ... . :4 .vS ..,...'E r.. .. .{ .. ..... ........... "r.... :...}..........

I

Women'~s'Weekend Daily Photo by DOUG McMAHON
State Senator Lana Pollack addresses and audience at East Quad last night
as part of Women's Weekend. See story, page 2.
Wo men's newsletter

State to
release
deferred
'U' aid
From staff and wire reports
LANSING - State Treasurer Robert
Bowman announced yesterday a plan
for paying 85 percent of the money
deferred from colleges and universities
earlier this year, by June 30, but war-
ned the schedule could be affected by
tax collections.
The University has lost $45 million in
state deferrals since Jan. 1.
THE STATE will also make paymen-
ts to schools and local governments,
Bowman said. Under the payment
schedule, the state will shell out $416
million - 56 percent of the amount
owed - on April 18, and another $299
million on May 23.
The final June 30 installment will
total $296 million.
See STATE, Page 2

to continue
By SHARON SILBAR
University officials announced Wed-
nesday the University would continue
to fund the Women's Information Net-
work Bulletin, a quarterly newsletter
dealing with women's issues.
Bulletin editor Deeda Stanczak
charged last month that Viriginia Nor-
dby, the University affirmative action
director, told her the newsletter's funds

pl bshing
would be cut off because University
administrators were unhappy with an
article in the November issue in which
non-instructional staff members
criticized the University's salary
program.
BUT NORDBY denied that the future
of the bulletin had been in doubt
because University administrators
were unhappy with the article.
See WIN, Page 3

""""""""""""""AP Photo
Out on the town A ht
Astronaut Donald Peterson floats outside the cargo bay of the space shuttle Challenger during the first U.S. space walk
in nearly ten years.

TODAY-
I.O.U.
A TINY ALPINE village in Switzerland wants
French President Francois Mitterrand to honor a
debt incurred by Napoleon-when his army passed
by 183 years ago. Mayor Fenand Dorsaz of Bourg-
St. Pierre said yesterday a bill for $75 million will be
presented to Mitterrand during his visit to Switzerland

something for the benefit of your community," he said. A
bill was duly sent to Paris for 2,037 destroyed trees, the use
of 188 cooking pots of which 80 were never returned, 3,150
logs used to roll cannons over the mountain pass, local
labor at three francs daily per man, and the rental of mules
at six francs each per day. Nothing was heard from
Napoleon, and the village since then has regularly updated
the bill to include interest. Ql

great idea," agreed Jim Irwin, a 24-year-old photocopier
salesman who dropped by the Hall of Justice Wednesday to
protest a $20 parking tag. "This is convenient, because
sometimes you're without cash." Clerk Vadim
Menechayeff said no publicity has been given the ex-
periment for fear of an avalanche of plastic money that un-
trained clerks couldn't handle. "We're still in the training
period," he said. "The word that we were accepting credit
cards didn't exactly leak out, it trickled." The politicians
hope it will facilitate the flow of cash into the coffers of the
city. In the past. San Francisco police refused even to take

arrested after they allegedly took part in a strike at a local
bowling alley. Those arrested were charged with disturbing
the peace, speaking without a license, and using "profane
language."
* 1946 - On the eve of campus elections, 500 students at-
tended a debate over the merits of two rival campus con-
stitutions which were up for student approval.
* 1968 - 200 students marched on the National Guard
Armory in protest of the preparations for possible
deployment of guards in Detroit. The troops were preparing
to quiet potential rioting following Martin Luther King's

I

II

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan