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April 07, 1983 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.

Women's Softball at Eastern
Michigan today at 3:00 pm

SPORTS

Women's Tennis vs Michigan State
1:00 pm today at
Huron Valley Tennis Club

Page 8

Thursday, April 7, 1983

The Michigan Da0,2

m

RECORD SOARS TO 17-1

'M' nine sweep

Broncos

A. L.
Royals to rule

West
000

By MIKE BRADLEY
The putrid weather conditions which
prevailed at Ray L. Fisher stadium did
little to prevent Michigan from

sweeping a doubleheader from Western
Michigan yesterday.
It took the Wolverines ten long in-
nings to dispose of the Broncos in the
first contest. Doug Bair's two-out base-
hit broke a 2-2 tie, driving in Chris Gust,
who had walked and advanced to third
on a single.
MICHIGAN tied the game at two in
the third when Chris Sabo's bloop
double knocked in Barry Larkin from
second base. That ended the scoring un-
til the tenth.
Tim Karazim entered the game in
relief of starter Dave Kopf in the sixth
inning and threw five strong innings of
one-hit shutout relief to pick up his first
victory of the season.
The Wolverines upped their season
record to 17-1 with a 3-1 victory in the
nightcap. Again, it took some late in-
ning heroics to assure the victory.
MICHIGAN took a 1-0 lead in the
third when Dale Sklar tripled and
scored on a suicide squeeze bunt by

Larkin. The Broncos came back to tie
the score in the fifth when designated
hitter Abe Walker walked, stole second,
and scored on shortstop Tim Gourlay's
base hit.
Michigan struck back for the winning
runs in the sixth. Sabo reached base in a
single with one out, advanced to second
when Ken Hayward worked losing pit-
cher Kris Kuhn for a free pass to first
and scored after Jeff Jacobson's
grounder evaded Gourlay and third
baseman Steve Chumas. On the play,
Hayward was tagged out in a rundown
and Jacobson advanced to second. Left
fielder Fred Erdmann drove the final
nail in the Broncos' coffin when he
drove in Jacobson with a double.
That was all that Gary Wayne needed
to improve his record to 3-1. The junior
lefthander who entered the game in
relief of starter Casey Close in the sixth
retired Western in the seventh, and
Michigan had recorded its second
doubleheader sweep in as many days.

HEAD COACH Bud Middaugh was
pleased with the fact that his team con-
tinued on its winning ways, but showed
some concern about his pitching staff.
"We didn't pitch all that badly, but I
think we're going to have to get better.
We walked a lot of people today and
that's something we'll have to stop
doing," he noted.
The Wolverines take on Eastern
Michigan at home Saturday in yet
another non-league doubleheader.
'Bronco Bully's'
R H E
western Michigan ........101 000 000 0 2 5 2
MICHIGAN ..............011 000 000 1 3 6 1
WMU: "Brake(9), Kriswell(10) and Marquardt;
M: Kopf (5), Karazim (5) and Bair.
WP-Karazim (1-0), LP-Kriswell (2-1)
R H E
Western Michigan .............000 010 0 1 3 4
MICHIGAN................001 0020 3 60
WJMU:Kuhn (5V), Knoll (%) and2Marquardt;
M: Close (5), Wayne (2) and Bair.
WP-Wayne (3-1), LP-Kuhn (1-2).

Wayne
.. . posts 3rd win

...Angels, Chisox challenge'
By DAN COVEN
A Daily Sports Analysis
KANSAS CITY ROYALS - The Royals are a solid, veteran ballclub who
should win their fifth division title in eight years. K.C. pennant hopes focus
on its starting rotation of Larry Gura, Vida Blue, Paul Splittorff, Jeff
Leonard and Steve Renko. The Royals' superb speed and defense is designed
for Royals' Stadium's artificial turf. All of K.C.'s starting nine can swing the
bat, as the lineup includes two former batting champs; George Brett and
Willie Wilson. Dan Quisenberry (36 saves) will provide the relief. Danny
Creel, a first year pitcher, looks promising.
CALIFORNIA ANGES - This could be the chance for Autry's aging stars.
For the Angels to contend, Tommy John, Reggie Jackson and Rod Carew
must all stay healthy. The addition of an established reliever (or the
resurrection of Doug Corbett) could put the Angels back on top. Their lineup
is loaded with sluggers, and the loss of Don Baylor's bat will be offset by
rookie Daryl Sconiers and Bobby Clark. New manager John McNamara
replaces Gene Mauch who quit after the Angels blew a 2-0 lead in the playoffs
last year against Milwaukee.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX - The young Chisox are established contenders,
but are still a year away (two infielders and a reliever) from winning their
division. The Sox have endless depth on the mound, but the prolonged injury
to, ace Britt Burns will hurt. Super rookies Greg Walker and Ron Kittle will
replace Steve Kemp in the potent Sox attack. The Sox lack experience and
are short on speed and defense, especially at third base and shortstop. Still,
the pitching staff should keep the South Siders in the race through Septem-
ber.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS - The era of Billy Ball is finally over in Oakland.
Unfortunately, the mess Martin made of the A's remains, and it will take
several seasons for new skipper Steve Boros to get the team back in running
order. Oakland must hope for the return of pitchers Mike Norris, Rick
Langford and Steve McCatty to top form after being burnt out by Martin last
year. Led by Ricky Henderson (131 stolen bases in '83), the Oakland
baserunners will have the green light from Boros all year. A solid outfield,
but an infield that plays defense like a seive will make the A's a sure bet to
lead the A.L. in errors again.
SEATTLE MARINERS - In an improving division, the Mariners are
treading water. By losing veteran pitcher Floyd Bannister, the Mariners will
have to rely on, now disabled, Jim Beattie and the elder statesman, Gaylord
Perry, to anchor the starting rotation. Rookie phenom Ken Phelps should
add some punch to a feeble Mariner attack. Relief pitchers Bill "The Inspec-
tor" Caudil and Ed "Mr. Jello" Vande Berge will have to baffle opposing
teams in order to keep Seattle's offense in the game.
MINNESOTA TWINS - The Twins have the young talent to rebuild if only
owner Calvin Griffith would hold on to it. Led by a platoon of young sluggers
including Kent Hrbek, Tom Brunasky, Gary Gaetti, Gary Ward and John"
Castino, the Twins should hit 100 homers in the Metrodome this year. Unfor-
tunately, Minnesota's pitchers serve up the gopher ball faster than the Twins
can retaliate. Ron Davis is the "Twinkies" only consistent pitcher.
TEXAS RANGERS - Known throughout the Lone Star state as the
"Strangers," Texas has lackluster pitching and worse fielding. Preseason -
injuries to pitchers Danny Darwin, Charlie Hough, and Dave Schmidt will
force Paul Mirabella and ex-Tiger Dave Tobik into the starting rotation. The
Rangers have a solid outfield in Billy Sample (batted .500 this spring),
George Wright and rifle-armed Larry Parrish. New manager Doug Rader
will have his hands full trying to keep the Rangers out of the cellar this year.
Tomorrow: A.L. East Preview

Ex-'M' announcer calls f

By MIKE MCGRAW
Let us return to the golden days of
yesteryear, a time when radio was
king. It was a period of innovation and
an aspiring radio voice had to struggle
up the ladder of the airwaves to get his
words broadcast.
The time is the early years of the
previous decade and the place is station
WCBN, where talented sports announ-
cers iabound. The studios were then
populated by the likes of Ken Wilson, Al
Wisk and Chuck Kaiton, all three of
whom went on to announce in the
professional ranks. Wilson is currently
handling the Chicago Black Hawks,
Wisk has had a long career that in-
cludes stints with the Dallas Cowboys
and Kansas City Royals and Kaiton is
the play-by-play man for the Hartford
Whalers.

KAITON ARRIVED at Michigan in
1969, the year after Wilson had left, and
when Al Wisk was one of the top an-
nouncers at WCBN. While at CBN he
worked with with Wisk on Michigan
hockey for a few seasons and credits

him and his partner at that time, Lou
Glaser, for part of his success in the
early years.
"When I first walked into CBN, there
were 12 other freshmen there that wan-
ted to work," said Kaiton. "But no one
wanted to do hockey, they all wanted to
help out on basketball and football.
Back then the hockey games were
played at the Coliseum, which was like
an icebox, so no one wanted to go there.
So I volunteered and got to do stats for
Wisk and Glaser every game my first

year. Lou sort of groomed me as his un-
derstudy."
That experience led to announcing
several Michigan hockey games on
CBN his sophomore season. He and
Wisk used a microphone at the penalty
box to do interviews on the ice and
originated the three stars of the game,
a tradition still used at the Michigan
hockey games. While still in college,
Kaiton spread his talent out to another
Ann Arbor station, WPAG.
"MY JUNIOR year I did the
scoreboard show on WPAG following
Bob Ufer with the Michigan football
games," said the 31-year old Detroit
native. "Then I did hockey on WAAM
the next year along with their high
school football game-of-the-week. After
I convinced WAAM to do the hockey
games, my father sold all the adver-
tising and they went on to do Michigan
hockey for five years."
But Kaiton was not with the station
for the remaining years. In 1975 he
joined WIBA in Madison and covered
Wisconsin hockey for four years before
getting the Whalers job in '79.
"Getting the Hartford job was an ac-
cident," explained Kaiton. "I was
covering the Badgers in the '78 NCAA
finals and someone told me that the
Whaler job was open, so I sent them a
tape and was hired a year later.
"The previous year at the NCAA
championships was weird because
Wisconsin was playing Michigan in the
finals at the Olympia, but I had to do the
game for Wisconsin. The Badgers won
the game in overtime and now an awful
lot of NHL scouts tell me that they were
at that game and they all say that it was
the most classic NCAA final ever."
KAITON started out in radio as a hobby
but at WCBN it grew into an obsession.
"I was always fascinated by radio and
was always a hockey fan, so I combined
Cottge NN
Sunday thru Thursday
HAPPY HOURS
DRINKS 2 fori

or pros
the two," said Kaiton. "I started watching
Hockey Night in Canada when I was
seven."
His current job with the Whalers
works out well, despite the team's poor
showing in recent years. By covering
only hockey, it gives him the summers
free and during the season, travel is
minimal because Hartford is close to
many east coast NHL cities. But life
before the NHL wasn't as luxurious,
except for one instance.
"When I covered Michigan hockey
for WAAM one year," said Kaiton, "Al
Renfrew, who was the coach at that
time, made a deal with the station such
that he would budget for 21 players on
the road trips, but he would only take
20. And he would pay 'for my expenses
out of the Hockey budget. So I went on
the team plane for free and rode the
busses and at dinner they kept buying
my food. I didn't find out what was
going on until the season was over."

REICHERT ON DISABLED LIST:
M'nestersface 'MS U

By PAULA SCHIPPER
All predictions say that today's
women's tennis match between
Michigan and Michigan State will be
close. Such was the case in 1982 when
Michigan edged the, Spartans in two out
of three matches: That includes the Big
Ten Championships when the Wolveri-
nes bumped off MSU, 5-4, to capture the
third spot.
BUT DESPITE a current four game
winning streak, Michigan coach Oliver
Ownens is worried this time. His team
has been struggling with injuries
beginning with top singles player
Marian Kremer's knee injury last mon-
th. She may be back to play at the end of
April.
At least Kremer will have company.
PAULA Reichert twisted, and may
have cracked, her ankle in third singles
against Purdue on Sunday, though she
completed the match with a surprising
6-4,6-0 win.

"IT WAS hurt before and I twisted it
again, but it didn't hurt when I was
playing," said Reichert who may
return in two or three weeks.
What could be worst for the
Wolverines. Well, the current second
singles player, Stephanie Lighvoet, is
suffering from knee problems, too,
there's a possibility that she will not
play today, and that really has Owens
worried.
"I think if we were healthy I'd feel
pretty confident about it (the match),"
said Owens. "If Stephanie can't play
singles, we'll really be in trouble."
INJURIES ASIDE, the Spartans and
the Wolverines are evenly matched ac-

cording to the records. Both teams
smashed Notre Dame and Purdue last
week to up their standings. Michig
State is now 4-1 for the season, 1-1
the: Big Ten. Equally impressive are the
Wolverines who are 5-5 overall and 2-1
in league play. They are picked to come
third in the Big Tens again with;' you
guessed it, Michigan State behind in
fourth place.
"We thought maybe Michigan would
move up to the top twenty team spot (in
the nation)," said coach Rutz who now
admits Wolverine chances are slii
with all the injuries.
As for the Spartans, they are set*
the matches to be held at 1:00 today.
"We're looking forward to it."

USFL's

Birmingham

signs receiver Smit

II L

PITCHER MOON AD2.95
GLASSES MI"*LO "LIGHT.S

DOMESTIC HINES

.7S

4 :00 - Midnight

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) - Jim
Smith, receiver for the Pittsburgh
Steelers for the last six seasons, has
signed with the Birmingham Stallions
of the United States Football League.
Team officials announced the signing
yesterday, but neither terms nor
duration of the contract were disclosed.
Smith, a graduate of Michigan, is ex-
pected to suit up Saturday when the
Stallions play the Chicago Blitz.
A THIRD-ROUND draft choice by the
Steelers in 1977, Smith caught four
passes for 80 yards in his rookie season.
In six seasons with the National
Football League, Smith caught 110
passes for 2,075 yards - an average
reception of 18.9 yards - and 24 touch-
downs.
During the strike-abbreviated 1982

season, he averaged 22.8 yards per
carry.
"He is a deep threat although he is
big - 6-foot-2 and a fraction and around
200 pounds," said Birmingham Coach
Rollie Dotsch. "He can run and he's
aggressive. And he should give us the
threat at wide receiver and that should
really help our club."
Birmingham, in the Central Divisi
of the young football league, is 2-3
the season.
SCORES
Baseball
Oakland 5, Cleveland 3
Montreal 3, Chicago Cubs 0
Pittsburgh at St. Louis ppd
Softball
Michigan at Grand Valley State, ppd.

3'

Reichert

... on injury list

- -- - -- - - - m

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