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April 07, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-04-07

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40

Page 2-Thursday, April 7, 1983-The Michigan Daily

RHA has difficulty

filling exec.
(Continued from Page 1)
West Quad, is currently the wi
associations vice president. res
The association will attempt to fill the
vacant slot next week. Interested dorm In]
residents will be told to prepare a three su
minute statement to present to the RHA Ca
if they are interested in running for the Pot
position. fo
us
IN ADDITION to McCann, LSA
freshwoman Bridget Hassig was elec-
ted national communications coor- re
dinator and LSA freshwoman Peggy re
Waldron was elected secretary. Hassig I
and Woldron both live in Alice Lloyd. pl
Doug Anderson, an LSA freshman from te
West Quad, will assume treasurer or
position. be

positions
Although a small group, the RHA
elds significant power in some
sidence hall policy-making decisions.
March, the RHA narowly voted not to
pport a dormitory-wide boycott of
ampbell's products. If they had sup-
rted the boycott, the University's
od service would have discontinued
e of Campbell's products.
A week from Saturday, the RHA
presentatives will be elected in
sidence halls.
In the future, McCann said her group
ans a leadership workshop in Sep-
mber, inter-dormitory olympics, and
rientation recruiting by RHA mem-
ers.

Soviet missile poses
new threat to Europe

Care to dance?

AP Photo

This young lady was arrested after hurling something at a police officer who
was helping to protect President Reagan from the more than 3,000 protesters
who gathered outside a Pittsburgh convention center where Reagan was
speaking yesterday. Reagan was in Pittsburgh to address the National Con-
ference on the Dislocated Worker.
OPENING TONIGHT at CANTERBURY LOFT
A new play about the nuclear arms race
THE BOMBS by Tom Simonds
a musical which, in the tradition of Aristophanes, uses
the comic for the most serious purposes
Thursdays thru Sundays at 8 p.m.
ApriI-7,8,9, 10,14,15, 16and 17
at Canterbury Loft - 332 S. State
Tickets are $3.00 at Ticket Central in the Michigan Union
in advance, also at the door on those evenings.

(Continued from Page 1)
IF THE U.S. intelligence assessmen-
ts prove to be accurate, those missiles
would add to the perceived threat to
Western Europe represented by inter-
mediate-range missiles such as the SS-
2, which carries three nuclear
warheads, has a range of more than
3,100 miles and can hit Western Europe
from well inside the Soviet Union.
Nothing official on the SSCX-4 has
appeared in Pentagon reports, although
the recent Soviet Military Power
publication spoke cryptically of
"development of a series of long-range
cruise missiles intended for ground, air
and sea-launch platforms."e
That publication indicated a belief
that the air-launched version will be
carried by older Soviet bombers as well
as the Blackjack now under develop-
ment.
BASED ON available information, it
appears that the reported new Soviet
ground-launched SSCX-4 may be a
counterpart to the U.S. GLCM,
although the American weapon has a
shorter range.
The United States, with the official
backing of the NATO alliance but op-
position from peace groups in Western
Europe, plans to deploy 464 GLCMs and
108 Pershing 2 ballistic missiles in
allied countries starting late this year.
President Reagan, in a retreat from

his original call for a mutual ban of
European missiles, recently offered to
cut back on that deployment if the
Soviets will dismantle a proportionate
part of its arsenal. The Soviets have
balked at that, saying it still would
leave the West with a huge advantage
because British and French missiles, as
well as weapons launched from sub-
marines and aircraft, would not be af-
fected.
THE UNITED States and NATO con-
tend that the deployment of the 572
GLCMs and Pershings is essential to
counter the threat from SS-2s and some
older intermediate-range Soviet
ballistic missiles, SS-4s and SS-5s.
Cruise missiles, often likened to
small, pilotless planes, are powered by
jet engines and generally fly below the
speed of sound. Some are designed to
fly close to the surface to evade radar
detection. But if spotted, experts say,
they can be destroyed in flight. M
It takes a cruise much longer to reach
targets than ballistic missiles, which
travel many times faster than sound.
There is no effective way, for now, to.
stop a ballistic missile, even though its
flight is more easily detected.
LAST DECEMBER, Pentagon of-
ficials noted that Soviet Leader Yuri
Andropov warned that his country
would "match the United States
development for development."
Kulikov said the Soviets would have a
"reliable counterbalance" to whatever
new weapons the United States and
NATO should develop and that the War-
saw Pact will "spare neither efforts nor
means" to prevent any U.S.-directed
effort toward achieving Western
military superiority.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Soviets release Pentacostalist
MOSCOW - One of the 27 Siberian Pentecostalists trying to emigrate left
the Soviet Union yesterday, and one of the Christian fundamentalists cam-
ped in the U.S. embassy for nearly five years indicated they expected the
rest to get out also.
Lydia Vashchenko, 32, who left the embassy in January 1982, flew to Vien-
na to await the arrival of an American woman interested in her case. She is
the first well-publicized dissident allowed to emigrate since Yuri Andropov
succeeded the late Leonid Brezhnev as Communist Party chief in Novem-
ber.
Her sister Lubov, one of four other members of the family who have been
living in the embassy basement since June 1978, said as soon as 11 younger
brothers and sisters still in Siberia join Lydia in the West, "we will leave the
embassy."
An embassy spokesman said Lydia's departure was "an encouraging
sign." But he said there was no indication that the Soviet government was
preparing to let any of the other 26 emigrate.
The embassy has been host to the Pentecostalists since June 1978, when
the group that became known as the Siberrian Seven rushed past Soviet
guards at the gates and refused to leave until the U.S. government got per-
mission for them to leave their homeland. They said they had been trying to
emigrate to Israel because of religious persecution.
Senate committee vows to
slash Reagan defense spending
WASHINGTON - Senate Budget Committee leaders bluntly told
President Reagan yesterday that his record defense budget will be cut one
way or another - either by the president or by the committee.
The panel's senior Democrat, Sen. Lawton Chiles of Florida, said he told
Reagan at a White House meeting "there was no way" his original proposal
will pass.
Sen. Pete V. Domenici, committee chairman, said he told the president he
will have to "take a chance" on where the committee votes to trim military
spending unless he offers cuts of his own. Domenici (R-N.M.) hinted that
private negotiations might soon be under way with the White House and said
he still believed Reagan and the committee's 12 Republican members can
agree to a compromise covering not only defense but other areas of the
budget.
Senate GOP Leader Howard Baker of Tennessee told reporters, "I'm
telling you I think this thing will work out."
Domenici said a vote on defense spending could come as early as today.
Speaking privately, committee members and aidessay no more than four
of the panel's 22 members support Reagan's $1.8 trillion, five-year defense
buildup as he submitted it.
Warsaw Pact officials to
reject Reagan's arms proposal
PRAGUE, Czechoslovakia - Foreign Ministers from the Warsaw Pact
communist alliance began two days of talks yesterday expected to reject
President Reagan's latest disarmament proposal and call for and East-West
non-agression treaty.
The foreign ministers' meeting coincided with tough warnings in Moscow
that the Soviet Union would match deployment or development of any new
weapons by the United States or NATO.
And in East Germany, visiting Soviet Defens Minister Dimitri Ustinov
warned that deployment of 572 U.S. Pershing-2 and cruise missiles in
Western Europe would make those nations "targets for nuclear retaliation."
The barrage of Soviet statements came in response to Reagan's offer last
week to deploy fewer missiles in Western Europe if the Soviets cut back 600
medium-range missiles to an equal number.
NATO says sanctions failing
BRUSSELS, Belgium - Experts at a major NATO conference on East-
West relations expressed skepticism yesterday about the power of Western
economic sanctions to change Kremlin policies or hinder Soviet military
buildups.
Several participants, in a finding described by one scholar as "em-
barrassing" for the Reagan administration, said the embargo on grain and
other food hurt the Soviets more than have the bans on high technology.
The views were expressed by economists, government experts and
business analysts on the opening day of a three-day seminar sponsored by
NATO's economics branch, which advises the alliance on financial and trade
trends in Soviet bloc countries.
It was the department's first comprehensive public review of embargoes
imposed since 1979 in an attempt to modify Soviet activities in Afghanistan-
and Poland.
23 guerrillas killed in Nicaragua
MANAGUA, Nicaragua - The leftist Nicaraguan government's troops yester-
day battled rebels in northeastern Zelaya province trying to create a
"liberated" zone there, government military sources reported.
The Sandinista army killed 23 guerrillas who were trying to reach a gold
mine in Zelaya, the Defense Ministry said.
A rebel broadcast said anti-Sandinista Indians killed 30 government

soldiers and wounded 10. It also said four air force planes bombed Indian
communities all day Tuesday in Zelaya province, on the east coast, and
killed "dozens of women, old people and children."
A Defense Ministry communique said the 23 rebels killed were part of an
"invading force" that traveled by river to within 11 miles of the Bonanza
gold mine, 270 miles northeast of Managua. It said nothing about army
casualties.
Vol. XCIII, No. 148
Thursday, April 7, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $7.50 in Ann Arbor; $8 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
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The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
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News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 763-0375; Circulation,
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al

al

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techniques
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REGISTRATION: 9am.
Register upon
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3200 Student
Activities
Build ing

FREE
INTRODUCTORY SEMINARS
Tuesday April 5, 1983
LSAT Seminar 6:30pm
GMAT Seminar 7:30 pm
GRE Seminar 8:30 pm
Campus inn, 615 E. Huron Ave.
Ann Arbor
Cy Shoemaker -Kusko
]I Testing Preparation Services

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Your are cordially invited to
attend a free LSAT, GMAT, or GRE
seminar. No RSVP required.
For further details
CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-345-3033

No CIVIUANBD
CAN MAKE YOU THIS OFFER.

If you're a musician who's serious
about performing, you should take a
serious look at the Army.
Army bands offer you an average
of 40 performances a month. In every-
thing from concerts to parades.
Army bands also offer you a
chance to travel.

The Army has bands performing
in Japan, Hawaii, Europe and all
across America.
And Army bands offer you the
chance to play with good musicians. Just
to qualify, you have to be able to sight-
read music you've never seen before and
demonstrate several other musical skills.

It's a genuine, right-now, imme-
diate opportunity.
Compare it to your civilian offers.
Then write: Army Opportunities, P.O.
Box 300, North Hollywood, CA 91603.
ARMBAN
BE ALLYOU CAN BE.

01

Editor-in-chief.. . . . . . . .
Managing Editor .. . .
Opinion Page Editors .......... .
University Editor ............. .
News Editor................
Student Affairs Editor ........., .
Arts/Magazine Editor ........:.
Associate Arts/Mogazine Editors.
Sports Editor. ................. k.
Associate Sports Editors.........

BARRY WITT
....JANET RAE
..... KENT REDDING
DAVID SPAK
FANNIE WEINSTEIN
.. GEORGE ADAMS
..... BETH ALLEN
.....BEN TICHO
...... LARRY DEAN
MARE HODGES
SUSAN MAKUCH
......... JOHN KERR
.... JIM DWORMAN
LARRY FREED

son Faye. Chris Gerbosi. Paul Helgren. Steve Hunter
Doug Levy. Tim Mokinen, Mike McGraw. Rob Pollard
Dan Price. Paul Resnick, Scott Salowich. Amy Schiff..
Paulo Schipper. Adam Schwartz. John Toyer. Steve.
Wise.
BUSINESS MANAGER.........SAM G. SLAUGHTER IV
SALES MANAGER;....................MEG GIBSON
DISPLAY MANAGER................. JEFF VOIGT
CLASSIFIED MANAGER............... PAM GILLERY
OPERATIONS MANAGER..........LAURIE ICZKOV1TZ
NATIONAL MANAGER.................GITA PILLAI
FINANCE MANAGER ...............MARK HORITA
ASSISTANT DISPLAY MANAGER ..... NANCY GUSSIN
ASSISTANT FINANCE MANAGER .........JOE TRULIK
101 rann I.Tn TI& ..MfLcAw

Ami

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