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April 01, 1983 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Gay rights
proponents
*appeal t
Shapiro
1or support
By SHARON SILBAR
.Members of a campus gay rights
W group will meet with University
President Harold Shapiro today to
present their case for a University
policy opposing discrimination against
homosexuals.
- Member of Lesbian and Gay Rights
,on Campus (LaGROC) are pushing for
ran amendment to University by-laws
-hat would bind the University to non-
discrimination on the basis of sexual
.orientation.
THERE presently are no legal chan-
nels through which gays can file
grievances against the University,
-although LaGROC members say com-
plaints abound.
"Wherever gay people lack legal
rights to protection, their vulnerability
to discrimination is especially acute,"
iaccording to a report LaGROC has
submitted to the administration.
The executive officers have asked
Virginia Nordby, the University's af-
frmative action director, to examine
the possibility of adding sexual orien-
tation to, the present University non-
:discrimination policy. Nordby refused
comment on the results of her study,
but LaGROC members with whom she
as met, say Nordby probably is recom-
mending against a revised University
policy.
RATHER, LaGROC members say,
Nordby probably will recommend that
Shapiro issue a presidential policy
statement - a move with less impact
than a policy approved by theRegents.
Although such a statement has not
yet been offered to LaGROC, the groups
says that Nordby has been pushing the
advantages of that action in their
discussion with her.
Donovan Mack, a LaGROC member,
said that a presidential policy would be
insufficient. "There is no clear in-
dication as to why we could not have a
by-law change," he said. "Our proposal
is not for a presidential policy
statement. Our proposal is for a by-law
change."
THE MAJOR objections to a Regeo-
tal policy center on University contacts
with outside agencies. Such a policy
could have negative effects on Univer-
sity ties to the military and subcontrac-
rs working on campus.
The military issue has created con-
Joversy at several law schools, which
brohibit discrimination against
omosexuals and have banned the
iilitary from recruiting its students on
1ampus. The military does not allow
homosexuals in its ranks.
If the University adopts the non-
-iscrimination policy, it would have to
nswer to the potentially contradictory
S Sractice of allowing military recruiters
nd ROTC programs on campus while
Maintaining a policy that would outlaw
discrimination based on sexual
preference.
With a strict policy, the University

.lso would face the possibility of losing
over $5 million in military research
projects. The Pentagon already has
threatened to withdraw research gran-
-s from schools that ban its recruiters,
* and several law schools have backed
down under pressure from the defense-
department.

The Michigan Daily-Friday, April 1, 1983-Page 7
Pot law proponents
say avoid Hash Bash

By KRISTIN STAPLETON
On the eve of Ann Arbor's annual
Hash Bash, critics of an effort to repeal
the city's lenient $5 pot law said yester-
day that students should stay away
from the affair because it only fuels the
anger of the repeal's supporters.
The Hash Bash "draws undue atten-
tion to what the repeal supporters are
trying to get across," said Scott
Prosterman, the head of a group that
opposes a change in the pot law, at a
press conference in City Hall.
PROSTERMAN and other members
of the Committee Against
Decriminalization attacked the ballot
proposal because it puts the issue of
marijuana laws back into the hands of a
politically vulnerable city council.
Once the pot law is taken out of the
city's charter, the city council might
impose an excessively strict law if it
were supported by a vocal minority of
citizens, the critics warned.
Leslie Morris, the Democratic can-
didate for mayor, said the debate on the
marijuana law is a waste of time. She
said "a truce" had been declared since
passage of the $5 law nine years ago

and that proponents of the repeal - in-
cluding her Republican opponent,
Mayor Louis Belcher - are only trying
to stir up old problems.

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and
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$2.00 WED. SAT. SUN SHOWS
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AP Photo
Fire flow
Molten lava starts to pour through the open doors of a restaurant near the slopes of Volcano Etna yesterday. The
Sicilian volcano has been spewing lava since Monday.

ledical students object

(Continued from Page 1) -
male students who fail to register for
the draft, according to Diane Samples,
director of financial aid at the Medical
School.
'We are not requiring it of students,"
Samples said, "but we simply
distributed the forms and told them if
they want to submit it they can and
then if the law is implemented there
won't be any delay in their aid."
Samples' request is more drastic
than any steps the University's two
other financial aid offices have taken.
OVER 50 percent of medical students
receive financial aid, but only about 100
are draft-age males.
"I object strenuously to complying
with the law," said fourth-year Inteflex
student Anthony So. "Why should (the
medical school) be the first ones to
comply with the changes, it seems
premature to me.
"Doctors are dedicated to the preser-
vation of life, not war. If efficiency is
what they want, then they should have
proceeded as if it was clearly voluntary
or at least accounted for conscientious.
objectors.
IT SEEMED to me that we were
supposed to complete the forms or we
wouldn't get-aid."
Third and fourth year Inteflex
;students are the first medical school

classes to be affected by the Selective
Service Act.
The directors of the law school and
main financial aid offices are not
changing their procedures until it is
certain the law will be enforced.
WHETHER the law is enforced
depends on the final outcome of a
recent Minnesota federal court ruling
which temporarily blocked enfor-
cement of the law. Colleges nationwide
are unsure if Judge Donald Alsop's
decision affects all students or just
those in Minnesota. A final decision is
not expected for another month, attor-
nies in the suit said.
Harvey Grotrian, director of the
University's main financial aid office,
said he thinks the chances of the law
being enforced this year are slim.
"We have made a judgement to do
business as usual. If the medical
school feels compelled to request aid
applicants for next year to sign com-
pliance statements it is their
prerogative," he said.
"Requesting statements as a
precaution is a lot of administrative
work since only a few students will be
affected," Grotrian said.
If the law does go into effect, Grotrian
said his office will mail statements to
students during the summer.
The financial aid office at the Law
School has taken the same position.

to draft law
Patricia Whitesell, the law school's
senior financial aid officer, said she is
certain the law will at least be delayed
significantly.
A BILL approved by the House Sub-
committee on Postsecon dary
Education last week would delay the
law for seven months.
The Department of Education also
announced last week a set of revised
rules that would not require students to
submit a copy of their Selective Service
acknowledgement letter, but only make
them sign a statement of draft com-
pliance, indicating whether or not they
have registered.
Medical students who comply with
Samples' request and submit their
acknowledgement letters would be
doing more than the new rules would
require.
SAMPLES SAID her request was
made before the revised rules came
out. She also said because of the small
number of draft-age males in the
medical schools, he request has not had
that big of an effect.
If the Minnesota court ruling applies
nationwide the medical school's
request for students to comply with the
law could put them in contempt of
court, said Jim Miller, an attorney for
the Minnesota Public Interest Group,
one of the parties in the suit.
Miller said asking students to comply
with the law is "coercion" and a
request is not voluntary when the
student knows there is a law requiring
them to do so.
Nationwide close to 96 percent of
draft-age males have registered,
leaving only 400,000 who have not com-
plied.

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Theater dept. faces review

(Continued from Page 1)
"I feel the LSA relationship is a logic-
al one for theater," said Theater Prof.
Richard Burgwin. He said that its
current location within LSA gives it
easy access to other departments, such
as English and history that are useful
to students and faculty members in
their studies and teaching.
BUT HE agreed that while the un-
dergraduate program is not much dif-
ferent from any other in LSA, the
department "has needs and concerns
that are different than any other depar-
tment in a large college."
Professor Mark Pilkinton said that
LSA is the driving force behind the
change, as his department does not
seem interested in making a move.
"Apparently LSA is interested in sen-
ding theater somewhere else, more
than theater is interested in going."
Pilkinton said he thought part of the
problem might be that the functions of

the theater department are not under-
stood by administrators and other LSA
departments.
HOLBROOK said the review wa
"'the sort of review that goes on all th
time," and that he did not believe tha
"anyone feels threatened by thi
review."
The committee is expected to submit
its report to the academic affairs office
sometime near the end of this term.

5s
e
t
s

University of Michigan
WOMAN'S GLEE CLUB
CONCERT
Conductor: Rosalie Edwards
April 15 8:00 p.m.
at Rackham Auditorium
Admission Complimentary

10:00 THIS I S
12:15 TOMA

S A HELL OF A WAY
VE A LIVING.

'I

TO REP12ESENT YOU -
M ASSEMB Y iNEEDS MORE TMAN YOUR MONEY
Financial Aid Course Evaluation
Student Legal Services Security Task Force Redirection
VOTE
MSA ELECTIONS
Apr'il 5th & 6th
POLL SITES

2:30 AOOSUP O
4:45 DUSTIN
7:10 HOFF'YAN
9:30 A COLUMBIA E
PICTURES RELEASE
10:00 GANDHI.
1:30 The Man of
5:00 the Century.
8:30 m O IA
8:30 ®P ICTURESRELEASE
No $1 Tues.
or Discounts
2:30
7:00
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1230 DUGAN
5:00 RETURNS
9:00 ]__

1:00
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Fri.& Sat.

U .

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Smiles

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EE5

0 1982 EMBASSY PICTURES

d ° 1:00
of te3:00
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p] 9:30

Apr. 5 9:00 am - 3:30 pm
Fishbowl
Business School
Law School
CRISP
Major North Campus Buildings
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Engineering Arch

April 6 9:00 am - 3:30 pm
Fishbowl
Business School
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CRISP
Natural Resources
Major NorthCampus Buildings
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Fninaanrinrn A rr.

Ther

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