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April 01, 1983 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-04-01

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Morris, Belcher abuses over

The Michigan Daily-Friday, April 1, 1983-Page 5

- 1. 1 .--- ---- .1

(Continued from Page 1)
s n.
Her accusations - centering on
abuses of power by Belcher - accen-
a ate the differences between the two
ttndidates' platforms.
"Morris says she wants to see more
spport for small business in Ann Ar-
bor. In addition, she would like to see
the city expand into other areas of
6ommerce. Although she encourages
development of high technology in the
City, she does not want this accom-
plshed at the taxpayers' expense.
"I don't like to see tax abatements
just given away ... I'm absolutely
against tax abatements unless you can
prove this is the only way Ann Arbor
gets the business." However, Morris is
not adverse to the possibility of making
idw-interest loans available to local
siall businesses.
"I think Ann Arbor should try to
diversify its economic base in several
directions and high technology is not
diversification. High technology is in
line with the University's dominance of
this city's economy," Morris explained.
"The Democratic candidate says she
does not believe development of high
echnology in the area will solve any
unemployment problems. "I think that
some of the small businesses that we
have here in the service, arts, and craf-
ts sectors are actually better (for) job
creation than high technology ex-
'lusively," Morris said.
For the most part Morris supports the
city's Downtown Development
*Authority and its efforts to revitalize
Ann Arbor's downtown district. Her
early reservations about the com-
mission involved the possibility that
some residential areas would be con-
verted into commercial districts.
She is pleased that a downtown
parking structure has been planned by
the development authority, but she
doesn't "want (parking) to be the sole
emphasis" of the group. Morris would
like to see the DDA concentrate more
* seriously on making improvements in
pedestrian walkways, parks, and down-
town housing.

Morris is opposed to the repeal of the
$5 pot law, as are most Democrats. "I
think it's just a transparent attempt to
get some political points with some
people who want to purge the town of an
action they see as taken up by some
undesireables," she said.
Morris claims that marijuana use has
declined among both University and
high school students. She said she feels
police time and manpower could be
devoted to other activities. As an alter-
native, Morris favors implementing a
drug education program through local
schools as a means to heighten
awareness about drug abuse and
discourage its use.
Contrary to Belcher, Morris thinks
the $5 pot law's present status as an
amendment to the city's charter is
proper. As an ordinance, she says, the
law would be a "political football,"
changing every time the majority of

council changes.-
She also supports ballot proposal A -
the "weatherization proposal. Morris
scoffs at Belcher's claim that
weatherization legislation does not
belong in the city's charter. City coun-
cil, she says, has ignored the issue, and
with a Republican majority.can be ex-
pected to do so in the future.
Morris supports the other three ballot
proposals.
According to Morris, Belcher has
been "naive" in his past dealings with
the University. She said she sees both
good and bad points about the Univer-
sity's relationship to the city, but
recognizes the need for strong com-
.munication between city government
and school administrators.
"We've got to have a good relation
with the University . . . of course the
University is resented by a lot of the

townspeople because it doesn't pay
property taxes. The University of
Michigan causes a financial problem to
the city, and the University is a finan-
cial boon. It regards itself as superior to
the city of Ann Arbor. .. in some sen-
se, it's a higher level of government, in
some sense it's the economic base of the
town," Morris said.
Morris said she isn't opposed to
having students serve on city boards
and committees. "Students shouldn't
be separated from the rest of the com-
munity," she said.
Morris thinks Republicans have
ignored social services too long. "I
think there's a lot of community sup-
port for social services," she said. She
proposes to appoint a committee to
design a new tax for social services if
she is elected.

Jensen says city is mismanaged

By RITA GIRARDI
and THOMAS MILLER
No one ever said third party cam-
paigns were easy. Just ask Paul Jen-
sen, the American Independent Party
candidate for mayor of Ann Arbor.
Jensen, 29, has virtually been
ignored as a serious choice for the job,
but that doesn't mean he's giving up
without a fight.
"I wouldn't be in this race if I didn't
think I could win," Jensen said.
He says the city is in serious
trouble..
"I think our problems come not only
from a mismanagement and
misrepresentation by the present ad-
ministration, but also from a lack of
communication (between city gover-
nment and the citizens)," Jensen
said.
"I want to create a 'new' Ann Ar-
bor. We have to stimulate business in
Ann Arbor," Jensen said. "There are

a lot of people who are aware that
there's a need for a change."
To create a "new" Ann Arbor, Jen-
sen says he is working on a new
budget to accommodate more
flexibility in city spending.
One of the areas that Jensen would
like to concentrate on is taxes.
"I am appalled at the way taxes are
being handled these days. We have a
large surplus of money - about $2
million," Jensen said.
He wants to return the money to the
taxpayers through property tax
breaks. Most city officials say the
surplus Jensen is referring to is
necessary "working capital," without
which the city would encounter cash
flow problems.
Jensen's views differ from his op-
ponents largely because he tends to
have few specific proposals to combat
the problems he sees.
Yet, he claims that he is the best

man for the job.
"I know this city better than
anyone. As a non-elected official, I've
done more in two years that Leslie
Morris have done in eight," Jensen
says.
Jensen would like to see the Down-
town Development Authority disban-
ded, but he proposed nothing in place of
it to attract business to Ann Arbor.
The relationship between the city
and the University is a problem that
he thinks has long been ignored. He
would like to see a better interaction
betweeen the two, including more
student contact with the mayor's of-
fice.
At a recent mayoral debate at
which he read from John F. Ken-
nedy's 1960 inaugural address Jensen
managed to raise more laughter than
he did serious support for his can-
didacy.

AP Photo

A holy kiss
Pope John Paul II kisses the foot of a young boy yesterday to commemorate
the Last Supper, when Christ washed and kissed the feet of his disciples.
OSHA totighten

i

Beicher thinks mayors must be assertive

(Continued from Page 1)
too much power. He says he can take
the initiative, but the final decisions
always rest with city council.
"The power of the city is in the city
council," Belcher said, "I can't do
anything unilaterally. I don't even have
executive powers to pass any of- these
things."
Morris and her Democratic allies
charge that Belcher is often tempted to
act unilaterally, and sometimes does.
The Democrats say' 'Belcher has
abused his power, especially in the case
of the Ann Arbor airport expansion.
They say he even may have broken the
law by requesting materials for the ex-
pansion without the council's consent
and despite city council's disapproval
of the airport project.
Belcher dismisses the accusations as
fabrications aimed at sabotaging his
campaign.
"It's a bunch of cheap politics,"
Belcher said, "they haven't got an issue
in this campaign. I haven't heard Leslie
Morris say 'what are you going to do as
mayor for the next two years."'
Belcher says economic development
should be the city's primary concern.
"In the city, if you have a strong
economic base, everything else takes
care of itself." The mayor, he says, is
an integral part of this development.
"My role, as it has been in the last
two years, is to help and to throw the
city's weight behind the effort to recruit
firms and to encourage development of
, new firms here," Belcher said.
Belcher sees the recruitment of high-
,ech firms as a key part of the economic

development, something his opponents
claim will make Ann Arbor too depen-
dent on one industry.
Belcher calls that claim nonsense.
"The strength of our economy lies in
the diversity of our high-tech base."
Belcher said. "The jobs these high-tech
firms will bring will be vital to the
health of Ann Arbor."
"In view of the fact that our Univer-
sity is downsizing, we're going to have
people unemployed who've never faced
unemployment before, and they're
going to be highly educated. We've got
to have fields for these people to go in-
to," Belcher said.
"Those jobs aren't going to come
from government, they're going to
come from the private sector," he ad-
ded.
Morris' problem, Belcher says, is
that she wants to create jobs, but isn't
willing to make the climate favorable
for economic growth. Morris has not
made a pro-business vote yet," Belcher
said.
His Democratic opponents say the
mayor should be concentrating on
developing small businesses already in
the city instead of recruiting big
business.
Belcher says he has never ignored
small business in Ann Arbor.
"(Democrats) are out to lunch on this
thing." Belcher said. "They don't even
know what a small business looks like. I
own five small businesses. Small
business is my strongest suit, not just
from a mayor's point of view - it's my
life," Belcher said.

Besides downtown development,
Belcher supports all of this year's ballot
proposals except the "weatherization"
proposal.
Proposal C - repeal of the city's $5
marijuana law - owes its existence
largely to Belcher.
In Ocober, 1982, Belcher began a
campaign for repeal of the law. He
dropped the effort when even the
Republican members of city council
failed to support him.
After a citizens group failed to get
even half the signatures required to put
the repeal on the April 4 ballot, the
Republican-dominated city council
voted to put the proposal on the ballot
anyway.
In case the repeal succeeds, the
council in February approved a backup
ordinance with slightly stiffer penalties
for sale and use of marijuana. Because
the present law is an amendment to the
city's charter, it can only be changed by
city-wide referendum. An ordinance,
however, can be changed by council
vote.
Democrats say the back-up ordinan-
ce is a political smokescreen meant to
attract voters to the repeal who don't
want extremely stiff laws. They charge
that council Republicans - who
presently hold a majority - will make
the law much stiffer once the amen-
dment is repealed.
Belcher denies the allegations, and
says the pot law repeal "isn't that big a
deal."
Belcher says the $5 law has attached
a stigma to Ann Arbor that the city

does not deserve. He is also opposed to
the law being part of the city's charter,
but says enforcement will not change if
the amendment is repealed.
"The backup ordinance will give the
police officer much more latitude with
how they charge a person," Belcher
said. With the backup ordinance, het
says it will be possible for offenders to
have their record erased by just atten-
ding a drug education class.
The other ballot proposal which has
received significant attention,
especially among students, is the
proposed "weatherization" charter
amendment. Though in favor of energy
conservation measures, Belcher again
opposes a charter amendment as the
vehicle to accomplish these goals.
He says that the city charter is the
wrong place for the law, because the
only way to make changes is by city-
wide referendum. He said he would
prefer an energy conservation ordinan-
ce. He also objects to proposal A
because the plan only coversrental
housing.
"We've got to have a plan to cover all
buildings, not just the rental section of
the market," Belcher said. Whether or
not the proposal passes, he says the city
is committed to saving energy.
"There are far more innovative ways
of doing things than the city charter
speaks to. We're not' afraid of these
things, but they have to make sense,"
he said.

job safety
WASHINGTON (AP)-The Oc-
cupational Safety and Health Ad-
ministration, apparently seeking to
allay concerns of critics who charge the
agency has been too cozy with business,
moved yesterday to restrict worker ex-
posure to benzene, a widely used
chemical known to case cancer.
OSHA spokesman Douglas Clark said
they plan to propose by May tighter
benzene health standard, saying "ob-
viously, by taking this action, we think
our current standard would need
revision."
Benzene has been shown to cause
leukemia in humans. It is a highly
volatile chemical used extensively in
making a long list of products that in-
clude detergents, plastics, solvents,
resins, disinfectants and pesticides.
CRITICS HAVE charged that at the
levels currently allowed, some 600,000
workers are exposed to hazardous
fumes.
The Urban Environment Conference
charged earlier this week that OSHA
had refused to move against benzene

standards
despite a recommendation by the
National Intitute of Occupational
Safety and Health. The group asserted
that benzene exposure "at the current
standard is estimated to result in risks of
1,400 to 1,700 leukemia deaths per
100,000 exposed workers."
The existing benzene standard, which
was issued in 1971, limits human work-
place exposure to 10 parts per million
parts of air averaged over an eight-
hour period.
A NEW standard, proposed in 1977,
would have lowered exposure to 1 part
per million. The standard was to have
gone into effect in March 1978, but was
postponed by court challenges filed 'by
the American Petroleum Institute and
other industry groups.

MSA COMMITTEE POSITIONS 8344
The following committee positions are open for studentrepresenta-
tion. Many more committees will be available for fall placement later.
* ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON * BOARD IN CONTROL OF
RECREATIONAL SPORTS INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
* HONORARY DEGREE COMMITTEE * UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
* MILITARY OFFICER EDUCATION PROGRAM
Application deadline is April 8th, 1983. Interviews will be held Saturday, April 9th,
1983. Sign up for interviews when applications are dropped off. Any questions should
be directed to the Personnel Office of MSA, c/o C. Reaves, 3909 Aichigan Union
763-3242.
ALSO POSITIONS ARE OPEN ON:
MICHIGAN UNION BOARD/ UNIVERSITY CELLAR
OF REPS (Grads preferred) / BOARD OF DIRECTORS MSA T /
(application deadline is also 4/8/83)

....................... . . . . ........ . . . ~ **
. . . .............. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...

Dioxin levels in Michigan
rivers dangerous - EPA

From AP and UPI
CHICAGO - Potentially dangerous
levels of dioxin are being released into
Michigan's Tittabawassee River by a
Dow Chemical Co. plant, a preliminary
report released yesterday by the En-
vironmental Protection Agency
revealed.
"This is going to become the ticking
bomb for human beings if it is ac-
cumulated over years and years," EPA
Region 5 Administrator Valdas

Adamkus said during a a news con-
ference.
"WE'RE TRYING to prevent this
type of tragedy in a decade or two," he
added.
The EPA study, concluded in Sep-
tember 1981, showed more than 40 toxic
chemicals, including the most
dangerous form of dioxin, are being
released by the Midland firm into the
nearby Tittabawassee River.

Sumer Session '83
e * **.* * **** .. **ee.* * *e * *e
............00 ........O.O.........e...
June 20--August 12, 1983
Language Workshops
June 13-August 19
To obtain a free copy of the Summer
Session Bulletin, containing full infor-
mation and an application, call or write:

Round Haus -
at Doole'
presents
All the soup, salad &

Summer Session
22 Wheeler Hall
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Telephone:
(415) 642-5611
V,

Name
Address

If w-s'w w rrv i n---% NE I.E U l1411

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