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March 30, 1983 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-30

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i

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, March 30, 1983-Page 5
Financial aid restrictions eased

AP Photo
Bumper to bumper
What looks like State Street after a Michigan-Ohio State football game is actually an auto junkyard in southwest Los
Angeles.
April ballot proposals confront voters

(Continued from Page 1)
rules, said department spokesperson
Bob Jamroz.
The law linking student aid to draft
registration, known as the Solomon
Amendment, after its author Rep.
Gerald Solomon (R-N.Y.), is scheduled
to go into effect July 1. But a bill ap-
proved last week by the House Sub-
committee on Postsecondary
Education would delay enforcement of
the law for seven months.
THE BILL is not an attempt to un-
dermine the law, said Thomas Butts,
who represents the University in
Washington. But, he said, it buys
colleges some time to adjust to the ad-
ditional workload.
Both the bill and the rules depend on
the final outcome of a Minnesota
federal court ruling in early March that
temporarily blocked enforcement of the
law.
It is unclear, however, if Judge
Donald Alsop's ruling would affect
students nationwide or just those in
Minnesota, Butts said.
UNTIL A FINAL decision in the Min-
nesota case is reached, University
students will not have to comply with
the new rules to receive federal funds
for the 1983-84 school year, said Harvey
Grotrian, the University's financial aid
director.
"Even when the rules are issued we
will maintain this same posture,"
Grotrian said. "If the law is ruled un-
constitutional and students are
required to sign a statement, then we
will provide them with mailings and get
it back in time for (aid) disbursemen-
ts."
The Justice Department has until
April 8 to appeal the Minnesota
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decision, but representatives of the
American Civil Liberties Union in
Washington say they are confident the
ruling applies to all students.
THE U.S. Justice Department has
asked Alsop to clarify his decision but if
he refuses, the department will ask a
circuit judge to do so. Depending on the
result, the Justice Department might
appeal the decision to a higher court,,
said John Russell, attorney for the
government.
One of the parties in the Minnesota
suit, the Minnesota Public Interest
Research Group(MPIRG), wrote a let-
ter last week to the Justice Department
asking for a final decision on the
judge's ruling, said Jim Miller, an
MPIRG official.
If the department does not respond
today, Miller said, MPIRG will file a
motion to find the federal government
in contempt of court.
"THERE IS NO question in our min-
ds that the decision applies to all
students, not just those in Minnesota,"
Miller said.
"The delay (by the Justice Depar-
tment) has led to confusion around the
country and is not serving students or
universities well," he said.
If the Solomon Amendment does go
into effect, the new rules put out by the
Department of Education would lighten
the administrative burden on univer-
sities, said department spokesman
Jamroz.
THE REVISED proposals would be in
effect for two years, he said. After that,
students would have to submit copies of
their registration acknowledgement

letters with their financial aid ap-
plications, Jamroz said.
During the two year period, the
Department of Education would sam=
ple student files nationwide to assess
the level of draft compliance, he said. If
the majority of students who signed
statements saying they registered were
honest, the tougher regulations would
not be imposed in 1983, according to
Jamroz.
When the law was first passed last
September, only 92 percent of draft-age
males had registered, according to the
Selective Service. Since then, a total of
96 percent have complied with the draft
law, which means only 425,000 men in
the nation have not registered.
Proponents of the Solomon Amen-
dment say that even a one percent non-
compliance is reason enough to enforce
the law.
"Students who receive federal
assistance must comply with federal
laws," said Art Jutton, a spokesperson
in Solomon's office. "It is the law of the
land and it is something that should be
complied with."

THE DAILY
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0 (Continued from Page 1)
The tax would be levied through 1988
fiscal year to maintain existing city
parks. As it is stated on the ballot, part
of the money from the proposed tax in-
cr'ease would be used to acquire more
land. This is a mistake. No additional
park land would be purchased with the
funds. Twenty-six of Ann Arbor's parks
are scheduled for renovation, but the
1971 park bond funds have been
exhausted.
There is little opposition to this
proposal as it seems most people place
parks in the same category as baseball,
hot dogs, and mom's apple pie.
But there are some problems with the
proposed tax. If the proposal passes, it
may set a precedent whereby other city
departments could go outside of the city
general fund to acquire money. The
,sanitation department could, for exam-
ple, have a referendum placed on the
allot that would levy an additional tax
or new garbage trucks.
The half mil increase would amount
to, about nineteen dollars a year for
a homeowner with property valued at
$75,000.
Proposal C-
pot law repeal
Possibly the most controversial issue
on this year's ballot is Proposal C -
repeal of Ann Arbor's $5 marijuana
aw.
As the law stands now, the fine for the
Isale and use of marijuana is $5. For
Ilarge amounts, police have the option of
prosecution under the stricter state
laws.
If the law is repealed, marijuana of-
fenders will be charged under a backup
ordinance passed by city council earlier
this year.
The backup plan calls for a $25 fine
for use, a $50 fine for sale of less than an
ounce, and a fine of up to $500 and im-
prisonment of up to 90 days for sale of
more than an ounce.
Without the backup ordinance, the
city would have reverted back to state
law had the existing law been repealed.
State law carries a maximum of 90 days
imprisonment and/or $100 fine for use;
1 year imprisonment and/or $1,000 fine
for possession; and 4 years imprison-
ment and/or a $2,000 fine for
distribution, regardless of amount.
Because the present law is part of the
city charter - approved by city-wide
election in 1974 - the question of repeal
has to be decided by referendum.
Ann Arbor Mayor Louis Belcher
began the repeal effort in October but
dropped it when it failed to get support.
After a citizens' petition drive last year
failed to get half the 5,200 signatures
needed to put the repeal on the ballot,
the city council put the question on the
allot anyway.
Opponents of the repeal charge that
the move is a political one. They claim
that if the present law is repealed, city
council, which now has a Republican
majority, will make the penalties stif-

fer. Any majority on council can change
an ordinance.
Backers of the repeal say that the $5
law has given the city a bad image, and
that the pot law belongs in ordinance
form rather than as a charter amen-
dment.
Proposal D -
Allen Creek drain
Proposal D would give the city per-
mission to sell bonds in order to raise
money for renovation of the Allen Creek
drain systems.
The bonds would raise $1,100,000 to
clean, maintain, and make repairs on
the existing drain. It would not
eliminate flooding due to heavy rains,
nor would the money be used to expand
the system.
The drain was built in 1926 and ser-
vices about 3,500 acres in the central
and western portions of the city.
There seems to be little if any op-
position to the proposal. Almost
everyone agrees that the renovation of
the system is necessary.
Proposal E -
Hydroelectric
How many times do you get
something for nothing? Not very often,
but that's what some say Proposal E
promises. This proposal would approve
funds to turn the city's two largest
dams into hydroelectric plants to
produce energy.
_. _

If passed, $3.2 million in general
obligation bonds would be issued to pay
for the work needed to renovate the
dams.
The project would pay for itself with
the electricity it provides.
As expected, there is little opposition
to this proposal.

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CUSTOMER INFORMATION FROM GENERAL MOTORS
HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH
TO DRINK IF YOU'RE DRIVING?
USING THIS CHART MAY HELP YOU KNOW YOUR LIMIT.

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First, you should under-
stand that drinking any amount
of alcohol can impair your abil-
ity to drive.
The generally accepted
way to measure intoxication is
by your Blood Alcohol Concen-
tration (BAC). In most areas, the
legal definition of intoxication is
.10 percent BAC and above.
However, long before you reach
.10 BAC, your judgment and
motor skills deteriorate rapidly.
In fact, some states include the
definition of impaired driving
ability, which usually begins at
.05 percent.
Important factors to keep
in mind are how much you've
drunk in a given period of time,
how much you weigh and
whether you've been eating.
Your age, individual metabolism
and experience with drinking
are also factors. However, it sim-
ply is not true that beer or wine is
less likely to make you drunk
than so-called "hard" drinks. A
6-ounce glass of wine, a 12-ounce
can of beer or 1'I ounces of
86-proof whiskey have about the
same amount of alcohol and will
have about the same effect on
you.
How to estimate your
Blood Alcohol Concentration.
Although the effects of alcohol
vary a great deal, the average
effects are shown in the accom-
panying chart prepared by the
National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration. Find your
weight in the left-hand column
and then refer to the number of
drinks you have had or intend to
have over a two-hour period. For
example, if you weigh 160
pounds and have had four beers
over the first two hours you're
drinking, your Blood Alcohol
Concentration would be dan-
gerously beyond .05 percent, and

level generally accepted as proof
of intoxication.
It is easier to get drunk
than it is to get sober. The
effects of drinking do taper off as
the alcohol passes through your
body, but the drop is slow. In the
example above, the person who

Even if you're not drink-
ing, other drivers may be. Your
best protection is still the seat
belts in your car. Accidents do
happen, and wearing lap and
shoulder belts doubles your
chances of coming through one
alive.

,
.

DRINKS (TWO-HOUR PERIOD)
I ozs. 86' Liquor or 12 ozs. Beer

Weight

100
120
1410
160
18(
200
220
24()

{'"2y {,' ak
rte 3 4
.. 2 k .Ja?.3x"::.'oer.: 4t:

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

5
5)
5

6
6
6!
6

7
7
7
7

8
8
8
8

9
9
9
9
9

10 I 12
10 11 12
10 1I 12
I) 11 12
It) 11 12

5 h! 7

8 9 10 1 12

5 ( 7 8 9 10 11

12

BE CAREFUL DRIVING
BAC TO .05%

DRIVING IMPAIRED
.05-.09%

DO NOT DRIVE
.10% & UP
Sourc: N H TSA

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The chart shows average responses. Younger people generally become
impaired sooner, while older people have more vision problems at night.
tests show a wide range of responses even for people of the same age
and weight. For some people, one drink may be too many.

had six beers would still have
significant traces of alcohol in
his blood six hours later. Having
a full stomach will postpone
somewhat the effects of alcohol,
but it will not keep you from
becoming drunk.
Black coffee, cold showers,
or walking around outdoors will
do nothing to make you sober. Of
course, someone who claims,
"I'll be okay as soon as I get
behind the wheel," may be mak-
ing a fatal misjudgment.
At General Motors, we have
developed a device which tests a

This advertisement is part
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give customers useful infor-
mation about their cars and
trucks and the company
that builds them.
MARK OF EXCELLENCE

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