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January 05, 1983 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-01-05

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Thieves active
over Christmas

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, January 5, 1983-Page 5
Band marches away
with a rosy award

By JERRY ALIOTTA
The Christmas holidays, normally a
time of giving, were a time of taking,
too, according to Ann Arbor police.
Thousands of dollars worth of Kmer-
thandise was nabbed during the
several break-ins that occurred over
Vacation.
"Easy to peddle items with good
resale value, such as stereo equipment,
cameras and televisions, were at the
lop of thieves Christmas lists, accor-
ding to Sgt. Harold Tinsey.
$1,305 WORTH of merchandise - in-
eluding the rug off' the floor - was
taken from an apartment on the 200
"block of Packard after a burglar forced
a door to gain entry, police said. On
Elm St., $635 in cash and $250 worth fo
stereo equipment was stolen from a
residence.
"We see a lot of B and E's (breaking
'and enterings) during holiday weeken-
ds and breaks, not just in the campus
4 area but almost everywhere," Tinsey
paid. "It's something that is hard to
prevent."
One suspect was caught, police repor-

ted. Marvin Crowder, 28, was arrested
on New Year's Day after allegedly
gaining entry to a State St. apartment
by breaking a window. Police were tip-
ped off to the crime by an alert neigh-
bor, who witnessed the suspect
carrying a television out of the front
door.
MOST CRIMES could be halted, if
more people would keep alert when
their neighbors are away, Tinsey said.
"We can do it if we get help," he said.
"That is why we always encourage
neighbors to keep a look out."
On campus, vandalism, not break-
ins, was the major problem. Two glass
doors at the north end of Mason Hall,
valued at more than $100 each, were
shattered during the holidays and
another glass door was broken at the
new Alumni Center, according to
Walter Stevens, director of the Depar-
tment of Public Safety.
The University, however, didn't suf-
fer extensive damage during the
recess, Stevens said. Besides the
broken glass, various buildings around
campus were blemished with paint.

By SHARON SILBAR
Although the Wolverines didn't walk
away with the roses this year, the
University of Michigan Marching Band
still managed to look like a winner.
During the Rose Bowl Saturday, the
marching band became the first
recipient of the Sudler Trophy, an
award established to "recognize
collegiate marchings bands of par-
ticular excellence," according to the
award's sponsor, real estate magnate
and fine arts philanthropist Louis
Sudler.
President Reagan congratulated the
band in a taped message. "The mar-
ching band is a colorful part of our
national heritage - it's an elixir that
stirs the blood, rouses the spirit and
improves the disposition," he said. "No

one's heart or feet can remain still
when a marching band goes by. . . So
congratulations again to the University
of Michigan."
Considered a companion to the
Heisman Trophy, the Sudler Trophy
stands 22 inches high and is valued at
more than $12,000. It will become a
permanent possession of the Univer-
sity.
The Trophy is inscribed with the
names of the University director of
bands H. Robert Reynolds, marching
band director Eric Becher, and former
directors Wilfred Wilson, Nicholas
Falcone, William Revelli, Jack Lee, and
George Cavender.
The marching band was selected by
two separate voting procedures.

RESIDENCE HALL HOUSING
AVAILABLE WINTER TERM
GRADUATE OR UNDERGRADUATE;
WITH MEALS OR NOT
STOP IN ROOM 1011 S.A.B.,
TELEPHONE 763-3164
8 A.M. to Noon; 12:30 to 4:30 Weekdays

M ysterious..window Daily Photo by ELIZABETH SCOTT
This window seems to be out of the ordinary-it shows both the inside of the
building and the scenery of the downtown alley that surrounds it.

i Candidates line up for city race

(Continued from Page 3)
is seeking re-election because, "There
are a number of things I am presently
involved in which I would like to see to
completion."
EPTON SAID that after years of
remaining outside the political system
he decided that he should get involved.
Epton said he feels people are "ready to
try unique alternatives."
He said that "encouraging small
businesses or cooperatives may create
more jobs per dollar" than present
governmental programs.
Republican incumbent E. Edward
Hood is not seeking re-election, so the
Fourth Ward is a race between two new
candidates, Democrat John Powell and
Republican Larry Hahn. Powell, a for-
mer school board member and
assistant director of community ser-
vices at the University, said his main
motive foi running was the need for
"some systematic planning on the path
the city takes in the next decade."
Republican Louis Velker is seeking
his second term as councilmember
from the Fifth Ward, where he faces
Democrat Kathy Edgren, director of
the inmate counseling program of the
University's Project Outreach

program.
Velker said he believes he has "made
some contributions to my ward and the
city," adding that he has "tried to vote
in a way to reserve the taxpayers'
dollars." Velker admits that being a
councilmember has its problems, but
said "you have to weigh the pressures
and grief you receive with what you can
do for the city."
Edgren said she feels the Fifth Ward
has "real potential for being a
Democrat ward." She said she feel-

that the current Republican majority
on the council has been "ineffectual,"
and has delivered "inadequate and
inappropriate" responses to the
problems of the city.
Edgren said she feels that the
primary issues facing the council are
human services, development of the
downtown area, and pothole and road
problems. She added that her ward has
some drain problems that she would
like the council to deal with.

PUTEM
54
Cigrte

AWAY

I

11

t A DAY.

do all
the Work.
Just fill out the RUSH SLIP below
(or pick one up in the store), and
hand it to one of our clerks.
b Voila! Your books will appear.
No searching shelves and pawing
through stacks looking for the
right book.
We maintain an up-to-date
list of required texts. And, of
course, any changes will
? 'bring a cheerful exchange
or refund (even for dropped
courses). Just return the
book with a receipt and in
the same condition
as purchased.
And how much does this
service cost? Nothing. W
guarantee it. If our prices
aren't competitive, we'll
refund the difference at
any time within two weeks.
What more could you ask?
NOTE: Please specify if you want new books.
Our clerks are instructed to provide
the best quality used books available
(and we've got a lot of 'em).

__ ___
i

Still Available!

P
:

The STUDENT DIRECTORY19
1982-83
STUDENTe r
DIRECTORY
ON
SA LE
NOW
Diag/Fishbowl Sales
Conducted by Members of
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
r

I

RUSH

SLIP

LIST COURSE NUMBER
DEPARTMENT INSTRUCTOR COURSE NO. SECTION NO.

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