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March 25, 1983 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Summer can

A

By JIM DAVIS
and PAUL HELGREN
e Michigan summer athletic camp
gram is a lot of different things to a
ot of dIfferent people.
To basketball coach Bill Frieder it's a
valuable recruiting tool." To baseball
oach Bud Middaugh it's a "service."
o softball coach Bob DeCarolis it's a
'way to boost your income a little bit."
3ut for most Michigan coaches the
ummer athletic camp program is a
iecessity whose importance is
oming increasingly vital to their in-
dual programs.
"TIlE SUMMER program is very,
ery important, especially for
ecruiting," said Frieder. "It's a
ecesgity because the competition for
ids is so great. It can be the edge."
Indeed, like Frieder, many Michigan

coaches feel their summer athletic
camp programs are a vital ingredient
to successful recruiting. Coaches are
not allowed to "recruit" young athletes
per se.. Everyone who attends must pay
their own way. But coaches can inform
youngsters about their camps through
the mail. Additionally, the choice of a
summer camp can have a great affect
on a young athlete's eventual choice of
a school. For example, Eric Turner at-
tended various basketball camps at
Michigan for six summers. Last sum-
mer, two campers at Frieder's camp
were Antoine Joubert and Quincy Tur-
ner.
Most coaches agree becoming
familiar with the university and the
sports program is an important in-
fluence on a youngster's choice.
"IT'S AN opportunity for the kids to

ips:ii
see Michigan," said Fritz Seyferth, a
coordinator in the summer football
camp. "They get familiar with our
program, our coaches, the way we run
things. It's an important experience."
One reason it is such an important
experience is that a few weeks in the
summer can make a lasting impression
on a kid who may be as young as eight
years old. A good experience at a
Michigan summer camp might have a
big influence when that same kid
chooses a college.
While most coaches agreed that their
camps are important for recruiting
purposes, a few said their camps hadn't
been around long enough to gain
dividends. That is not surprising
because, in some respects, the program
is barely out of its infancy.
UNTIL TWO summers ago there

The Michigan Daily-Friday, March 25, 1983-Page 11
budding enterprise

wasn't a camp program at all, only a
few scattered camps. Don Canham
asked Gloria Soluk, who was already
running a successful women's basket-
ball.camp, to organize a coordinated
program. She did and the Michigan
athletic summer camp program was
born.
The program, now under the direc-
tion of Don Triveline, an assistant to
Don Canham, continues to grow. There
are currently 17 different camps, with
soccer being the latest addition. This
summer, according to Triveline, 6200
youngsters will attend an athletic camp
at Michigan. "The program is
definitely growing," Triveline added.
While the program as a whole may be
growing, the individual camps are far
from equal. They run the gambit from
Dale Bahr's highly successful wrestling
camp, which had 1450 campers in six
weeks last year, to Francie Goodridge's
track camp, which had 50 campers in
one week last year.
BASICALLY, THERE are two types
of camps at Michigan; those owned by
the university and those owned by the
individual coaches. Five coaches,
Frieder, Bahr, Middaugh, John Gior-
dano, and Soluk, own their own camps
and pay a fee to the University for the
use of facilities. The rest of the coaches
are hired by the athletic department to
run a camp.
"It's definitely a different financial
situation (between the two types of
camps)," said Triveline. "We do all the
administrative work for-the University-
owned camps. The other coaches have
to do that stuff themselves."
Frieder, who used to run his camp
exclusively from nearby Concordia
College, said use of University facilities
was a major expense.
"RUNNING CRISLER Arena is a lot
more expensive than running a gym at
Concordia," Frieder said. "You don't
get things cheap from Don Canham.
He's got to get his share."
While there is more work to owning
your own summer camp, there are
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Youngsters go throughi
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drills during a summer hockey camp at Yost Ice

rewards as well. The wrestling
program, for example, has greatly
benefited from Bahr's summer camp.
"A lot of the money we earn," Bahr
said, "goes back into the wrestling
program. It supplements my assistan-
ts' salaries. We buy equipment,
posters, schedules, all those things not
provided for by the athletic depar-
tment. I've found, if you want
something you have to go out and earn
the money yourself."
BAHR'S HARD-WORK ethic has
helped build his program into the top

wrestling camp in the country in terms
of numbers. Most other camps have been
less successful as far as the number of
campers goes, but as Bahr said, suc-
cess doesn't always have to be
measured in numbers.
"We look at the total camp experien-
ce," the wrestling mentor said.
"They're not, just here to learn
wrestling, they're here to have fun,
too."
Based on that criteria, all the sum-
mer athletic camps at Michigan might
be called a success.

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