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March 24, 1983 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-24

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6

Page 10-Thursday, March 24, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Mark Mees has it all
and good manners too

Michigan honors Elliot

By DOUGLAS B. LEVY
How many of you Michigan sports
fans would love to be number one on the
Michigan men's tennis team? How
about winning four Big Ten Champion-
ships?
Mark Mees, who possesses poten-
tially lucrative and finely tuned tennis
skills, has earned these honors.
AFTER THREE years of wearing
down the second and third singles
players in the Big Ten, senior captain
Mees is now Michigan's number one
player.
Wearing down the opposition is what
makes Mees a champion. His ground
strokes are powerful and consistent.
Glamour is not a part of the Mees ar-
senal, he lacks the big serve and the
drop volleys.
On the court, Mees' style of play is
similar to that of his favorite
professional, Jimmy Connors.
"I LOVE the way he plays," said
Mees. "He's such a competitor. He just
won't let anyone beat him."
While determination, stamina and
consistency are his trademark, Mees is
unlike Connors in one respect. Mees is a
gentleman.
"Mark is different. He is a person
who is very concerned about people,"
said tennis coach Brian Eisner.
"Everywhere Mark has played he has
won sportsmanship awards and been

recognized for his on-court conduct.
Mark never has any problems with
(line) calls." '
THE ONE problem Mees has been
faced with from time to time is physical
injuries. Recently Mees has been suf-
fering from a sore hip.
"We just don't know what it is right
now," said Mees. "The trainers have
been great. We use ice and ultrasound
to relieve the pain.'
After playing in both singles and
doubles last Thursday against
Kalamazoo Mees felt no soreness in the
hip, something which excites him even
more for the upcoming Big Ten season.
"I'M REALLY excited. We've got a
pretty enthusiastic team. With two
freshman (Jim Sharton and Hugh
Kwok), getting fired up won't be a
problem," said Mees.
For the Zanesville, Ohio native, get-
ting fired up for a sporting event has
never posed a problem. "I'm a huge
sports freak for anything," said Mees.
In his four years on campus, the
education major has also developed a
genuine love for the University and his
coach.
"ANN ARBOR is unbelievable, I
wouldn't trade these last four years for
anything. I have made so many great
friends," said Mees.
"Eventually, if the opportunity ever
comes up, I'd love to coach tennis."
Eisner, a mantwho has spent many
hours devoted to improving Mees'
game, has made a powerful impression
on Mees' future career goals, "He'll
coach till he drops. He wouldn't stop
coaching for anything. He's not just a
coach, he's a friend."
Following this final collegiate season,
Mees will test himself as a professional
against competition that is brutal.
Although not a sure bet to be the kind of
champion he is at Michigan, Eisner
recognized Mees' most superlative
characterictic.
"Throughout his career at Michigan,
when he's had to do it (win) he always
has. Mark is a winner."
Dr. MEIR PAIL
"THE UNIQUE RESOURCE OF
THE STATE OF ISRAEL -
ITS MILITARY SYSTEM,
AND ITS LIMITATIONS"
Thursday, March 24 4:10 pm
Assembly Hall, Rackham

DETROIT (UPI) - Five men have
been named to the Michigan Sports Hall
of Fame, it was announced yesterday.
Scheduled for induction May 25 at Cobo
Hall are :
- Vic Wertz, outfielder-first
baseman whose 17-year career in
baseball included stints with Detroit
and Cleveland.
- PETE ELLIOTT, the only athlete
in University of Michigan history to
earn 12 varsity letters. He also coached
football 21 years with head jobs at
Nebraska, California, Illinois and
Miami (Fla.).
- Andy Farkas, the nation's leading
scorer with 11 touchdowns en route to
All-America halfback honors at
University of Detroit in 1937, and an All-
Pro and NFL's leading scorer with
Washington in 1939.
- Michael Adray, a Dearborn
businessman widely known as "King of
the Amateurs" for sponsoring hundreds
of athletic teams in seven sports since
1956.
- THE LATE Bill Muncey, Power-
boat's all-time winningest driver
was killed at age 52 while racing Oct.
18, 1981, in Acapulco.
Hall of Fame Commissioner W. Nick
Kerbawy said the 1983 class of honorees
brings to 119 those enrolled since the
hall of fame began 29 years ago.
Rangers 7, Red Wings 1
By DAN PRICE
Special to the Daily
DETROIT - The Detroit Red Wings

playoff hopes took a sharp dive last
night as they were soundly defeated by
the New York Rangers, 7-1 at Joe Lewis
Arena before a crowd of 11,483 disap-
pointed fans.,.
The loss put the Wings five points
behind Toronto in their battle for, the
last playoff spot in Norris division
with only five games remaining in the
regular season.
THE RANGERS were led by Rob
McClanahan who had two goals and an
assist, and Rick Chartois who also put
in two goals.
The Wings skated well for most of the
opening period, but with two minutes
left Berry Beck put home a long slap
shot from outside the zone. Less than a
minute later McClanahan scored off 4
two on one break away to give the New
Yorkers a two goal advantage going in-
to the locker room.
Detroit made the score 2-1 on a
Dwight Foster goal at the 10:11 mark of
the second stanza. But the Rangers
quickly came back with two goals bye
Chartois and McClanahan.
The final period was dominated com-
pletely by the Rangers as they out-
skated the Red Wings which resulted in-
numerous two on one and three on tw4
breakaways. The result was three more
Ranger goals. Red Wing coach Nick .
Polano was disappointed with his,
team's effort last night. "Not only did I'
not like losing, I was not pleased with;
the way we lost. We should have scored,
at least three times in the first period:
after that we were completely out-'
skated'and out-hustled. We didn't show
any character."

'Doily Photo by JEFF SCHRIER
Mark Mees, number one singles player on the Michigan tennis team and an
avid sports fan, is one of the few spectators at an early season baseball
game last year. The senior hopes eventually to be a tennis coach.

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Matehefts choosing playoff teams

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By MIKE MCGRAW
The four-man committee that chose
the eight participants in the NCAA
hockey tournament last week had quite
a Michigan flavor to it. Wolverine
hockey coach John Giordano was one
member of the panel and another, Air
Force coach John Matchefts, is a 1953

LSAT
JUNE 20th EXAM

GIORDANO WAS the only member of
the panel to vote for the Falcons, as
Matchefts and the other two panel
members, Fern Flamar of Nor-
theastern and Boston University
athletic director John Simpson, favored
UMD.
The job of selecting eight teams out of
over 50 college teams is understandably
difficult and Matchefts has seen
situations like that which occurred this
year many times.
"I've been on the committee seven
out of the last eight years and there's
been a lot of controversy," said the
Eveleth, Minnesota native. "It would
be easier to include more teams in the
tournament but the NCAA likes to have
a ratio of about one out of every eight
teams go to its tournament.
"THE PROBLEM with selection this
year has been the closeness in all the
leagues. The competitiveness has been
tremendous," he continued. "In the
WCHA, they had an overwhelming

season. I think there is no question that
their top four teams were among the
top eight in the country."
Matchefts, who is in his ninth year as
head coach at Air Force, might have a
point about the dominance of
the WCHA. In games against CCHA and
ECAC teams, the WCHA compiled a 22-
2 record and their record in all non-
conference games was 37-7. And he also
points out that the criteria for selecting
tournament teams says nothing about
a team winning its conference.

GMAT
JUNE 18th EXAM
GRE
APRIL & JUNE EXAM
FOR MORE INFO
ON REVIEW PROGRAMS
CALL 800-345-3033

graduate of the University.
Quite a controversy was stirred up by
the selection committee when it selec-
ted Minnesota-Duluth, fourth-place
finisher in the WCHA, for continued
play while CCHA regular season cham-
pion Bowling Green was left holding its
skates.

"In the categories that we were to
consider, Bowling Green had a better
record, but Duluth played a tougher
schedule," Matchefts said. "Their
records in post-season play were idens
tical so we used common opponents to
settle it. And in games against Wiscon-
sin and Michigan Tech, the two team
they had both played, Bowling Green
was 1-2-1 while Duluth was 5-5."
MATCHEFTS IS certainly qualified
to have a say in the NCAA tournament
because while he played at Michigani
he won three national titles and in 1953
was named the tournament's most
valuable player. Both Michigan hockey
and the NCAA tournament were quite
different in those days.
"Back then there were only six tea
in the NHL, so there wasn't much roo
to get into the pros," explained Mat-
chefts. "So when a player in Canada
finished playing junior 'A'hockey at
age 20, if he had good grades he would
go to college. There was no age limit
then and we had a guy playing that was
33. Those teams were much more ex-
perienced and skilled than they are
now."
When the Michigan hockey team
won three straight titles, there wer
'lines a block long waiting to get into th
games, according to Matchefts. And
the national tournament was held at the
Broadmoor resort hotel in Colorado
Springs, which sponsored the event
during its first ten years of existence.
"THE BROADMOOR was one of the
most luxurious resorts in the country,"
said Matchefts. "There was tremen-
dous incentive to be one of the four
teams that made it there."
After his playing days, Matchef
made the United States Olympic team
and won a silver medal at the 1956
games in Cortina, Italy. That team was
made up of most of the same players
that took the gold medal in 1960 at
Squaw Valley, but Matchefts was
ineligible to play in 1960 because he had
begun coaching professionally.

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