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March 23, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-23

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Page 2-Wednesday, March 23, 1983-The Michigan Daily
House /

says EPA
was wrong

0o

change

regulationAS
WASHINGTON (AP) - The En-
vironmental Protection Agency "ac-
td improperly or at a minimum
created the appearance of im-
propriety" in deciding not to regulate
formaldehyde as a suspected cancer-
causing chemical, a draft House report
says.
The report accuses assistant EPA
administrator John Todhunter of or-
dering changes in the opinions of
EPA's scientific staff and acting
administrator John Hernandez of
holding closed-door science courts"
that gave industry a special forum for
making its case.
TODHUNTER and Hernandez have
denied bending EPA's decision-making
to please the chemical industry.
However, allegations that they granted
industry undue influence in this and
other EPA decisions are under in-
vestigation by several congressional
committees.
Through spokesman Mike McDon-
nell, Todhunter denounced the release
of the draft report, charging that the
timing was "contrived for maximum
political publicity."
Todhunter, in charge of the office of
r pesticides and toxic substances,
decided Feb. 10, 1982, against taking
immediate action to regulate for-
maldehyde despite scientific research
showing that it casued cancer in rats
and thus possibly in humans.
IN A DECISION that drew sharp
criticism from environmentalists and
some scientists, Todhunter argued that
the evidence was not conclusive enough
to justify such a step.
Meanwhile, William Ruckelshaus
returned to the battered EPA, drawing
a thunderous cheer from thousands of
its employees with the promise that
"we will administer and enforce the
laws as they're written by Congress.''
President Reagan's nominee as EPA
administator spoke at the shopping
mall where the agency's offices are
located. "Our job," he told the
headquarters staff, "is to serve the
people, not to condemn them, not to
bully them."
President Reagan, he said, was
committed to cleaning up the environ-
ment and will give the agency the
resources to do the job.

AP Photo
Gov. James Blanchard welcomes Judge Patricia Boyle, his Supreme Court appointee, to the state government during a
news conference yesterday.
Blanchard appoints new justice

From staff and wire reports
LANSING-Less than two weeks af-
ter she appeared to take herself out of
the running, U.S. District Court Judge
Patricia Boyle accepted yesterday
what some believe may be a hot seat on
the Michigan Supreme Court.
Gov. James Blanchard announced
the appointment at a news conference
jammed with top officials from his ad-
ministration and the State Bar of
Michigan along with Boyle's husband
Terrance, a prosecutor.
BOYLE SAID the challenge of ser-
ving in state government at a turbulent
time and the opportunity to help shape
Michigan's laws lured her to accept the

high court assignment. She
acknowledged her appointment might
possibly be challenged legally.
The well-known federal judge will fill
the position vacated last month by the
ouster of Justice Dorothy Comstock
Reily-a move that has stirred almost
unprecedented controversy over the
court.
"She's an able person and she'll
make a good judge," said University
law Prof. Wade McCree, who was
originally thought to be a candidate. "I
told him I was not available," McCree
said.
THE 45-YEAR-OLD Boyle will
remain on the high court at least until

Jan. 1, 1985, but she indicated that she
will likely seek re-election in 1984.
Blanchard's appointee has enjoyed a
distinguished career as a prosecutor
and judge in the Detroit area.
She served as an assistant U.S. attor-
ney from 1964 through 1968 when she
joined the Wayne County Prosecutor's
office. She was appointed to Detroit
Recorder's Court in 1976 and to the
federal bench two years later.
BOYLE IS giving up a lifetime ap-
pointment as a federal judge to accept
the elective high court post, which pays
just $69-,000-$2,000 per year more than
her present post.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Israelis elect new president
JERUSA-EM-Israel's Parliament handed Prime Minister Menachem
Begin a stinging defeat yesterday by electing opposition politician Chaim
Herzog as the nation's next president.
In a secret ballot, Knesset members chose herzog 61-57 over Begin's per-
sonal choice for the ceremonial post, Supreme Court Justice Menachem
Elon. Two ballots were blank.
Begin's political opponents read the vote as a revolt in the ruling coalition,
which commands a 64-56 majority. Apparently five coalition members voted
for Herzog and two handed in blank ballots.
Begin's spokesman Uri Porat brushed off the setback as "nothing
serious." He quoted Begin as saying the outcome was evidence of "the
beauty of democracy."
Herzog, 64, born in Northern Ireland, quickly assumed the bipartisan
posture of the presidency, saying "I don't think it's a victory over the gover-
nment or a victory of any party. It's a victory for the Knesset."
Train carrying secret cargo
arrives at submarine base
BANGOR, Wash.-A train with a secret cargo believed to be nuclear
warheads pulled into the Navy's Trident submarine base yesterday, and
police arrested at least six people who tried to block the tracks.
As the train arrived, a mostly peaceful crowd of about 200 demonstrators
surged forward, but officers prevented anyone from getting in front of the
train. The train didn't stop as it passed through the fence surrounding the
base on Hood Canal, about 20 miles west of Seattle.
Police said those arrested, including a Roman Catholic nun, would be
charged with misdemeanors.
The arrival brought to an end a 2,000-mile railroad odyssey that began last
Friday in Texas. Trackside vigils were held throughout the Northwest by
people concerned about the spread of nuclear weapons.
Yesterday, as the train moved through Washington State, groups of
protesters gathered in Elma, Shelton, Longview, Chehalis and Centralia.
The protest at Bangor was the largest.
House approves jobs package
WASHINGTON - The House passed and sent to the Senate last night a $4.6
billion compromise package of public works and jobs and other aid to victims of
the recession. Earlier, Democrats won a test vote in their overall attack on
President Reagan's tax and spending programs.
the jobs measure, the first attempt by the new Congress to alleviate effec-
ts of the worst recession since World War II, also frees $5 billion in loan and
grant money needed by 27 states and the District of Columbia to continue
paying jobless benefits.
The key vote in the House was 329-86, and Senate leaders hoped for quick
action on the compromise. Final passage there was not a certainty,
however, because of a last-minute change the House made in the formula for
distributing the jobs money.
Reagan, who initially opposed a jobs bill but then yielded to congressinal
pressure, is expected to sign the measure when it reaches his desk.
Europeans urge new proposal
for missile reduetion talks
VILAMOURA, Portugal - West European governments yesterday urged the
Reagan administration to shelve the 'zero option" and make a new proposal
to unblock missile reduction negotiations with the Soviet Union.
If the negotiations make headway, the Europeans won't have to go ahead
with the politically risky deployment of new nuclear missiles in December.
Defense ministers told U.S. Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger they
"widely favored" introduction of a new U.S. proposal at the 18-month-old
negotiations in Geneva to reduce intermediate-range nuclear weapons in
Europe, a senior U.S. official said.
The allies made their plea at the opening session of a two-day meeting of
the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's 13-nation Nuclear Planning Group.
The group includes all the NATO members except France, which does not
participate directly in the alliance's joint military activities, and Iceland,
which has no armed forces.
Instead of continuing to press for elimination of medium-range missiles,
"there is a consensus that an interim agreement - on the way to zero -
could be a useful thing," said the U.S. official, who briefed reporters on con-
diton he not be identified.
Common market sumit ends
BRUSSELS, Belgium - The Common Market summit meeting ended yes-
terday without finding solutions to any of the major problems facing the
group's 10 members.
France's government resigned over its economic crisis.
The final session of the two-day Common Market meeting lasted barely 90
minutes, and the speed with which the 10 heads of state rushed home in-
dicated they had little reason to celebrate the results of their deliberations.
French President Francois Mitterrand shot back to Paris, where his 43-
member Cabinet resigned en masse in the face of a post-election economic
crisis, Mitterrand kept Pierre Mauroy on as prime minister and asked him
to form a new government.
Two key issues of the summit were postponed to the next meeting June 6

in Stuttgart, West Germany: The entry of Spain and Portugal into the Com-
mon Market and Britain's demand for a fairer deal from the community
budget.
But officials said the prospect of a farm produce war with the United
States, fought in the Third World marketplace, loomed larger than ever.

6

I

Senators back Salvadoran aid

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Reagan ministration would ge
administration picked up some support sought - possibly with
in a Senate subcommittee yesterday for THOSE conditions, h
its $110 million military aid request for clude imposing a cei
El Salvador, even though one senator advisers, requiring fr
said the Salvadorans "are thumbing tions, and bringing to t
their noses at us" on human rights. in the murders of fo
The fate of the proposal was uncer- women.
tain after nearly three hours of Kasten, chairman o
favorable testimony by Secretary of propriations subcomn
State George Shultz before the deeply operaitns, said the pa
divided subcommittee, but Sen. Bob early today on the first
Kasten (R-Wis.) predicted the ad- request. This amountv
Students bump and

t most of what it
conditions.
he said, might in-
ling on military
ee and fair elec-
trial the suspects
our U.S. church-
f the Senate Ap-
mittee on foreign
nel would act by
$60 million of the
would be diverted

from military aid programs for other
countries.
The plan was being considered by
three other congressional panels, and
any one of them could throw up a
roadblock by voting against it. The
deadline for taking action is tomorrow.
Shultz said the funds were essential in
the effort to help the Salvadoran gover-
nment turn back "Cuban-backed
guerrillas" in what he said is "part of
our contest with the Soviet system,"

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grind on TV show

(Continued from Page 1)
Mittenthal, a film and video major and
former intern for Community Acess has
been broadcasting the no-budget show
since last October. "All expenses come
out of my pocket," he said.
IN ADDITION to the music and dan-
cers that everyone associates with
"American Bandstand," the show has
its own version of Dick Clark in host
Hasbro Cashman. Although many
desribe him as a cross betwen Clark
and Chevy Chase, Hasbo is hisrown
man..
"Hasbro is inoffensive and non-
threatening," Mittenthal says, "and is
very involved in his character.

Sometimes I think he forgets his real
name."
Hasbro Crashman is really Daniel
Rivkin, a social science major in the
Residential College who is known for
his purple Video Dance Safari jacket
with "Hasbro" embroidered on the
front.
"I HAVE A lot of fun with Hasbro,"
he said. "He's a nice guy - a popular
guy - and it's a great feeling when
people come up to me on the street and
say, 'Hi, Hasbro-I watch your show
and really like it!'''
Hasbro and Bob Tool guide the show
along, but it's the Safari Dancers who
make the show. When the program
started, the dancers were all friends of
Mittenthal. Now word-of-mouth brings
new faces to the Friday night taping
sessions. Many live in East Quad, but
anyone is welcome.
"We never know how many dancers
will show up or what they wil do until
it's time for them to run into the studio
and start dancing," Mittenthal said.
"There's no routine. They just come out
and dance."
"IT'S GREAT," said East Quad
resident Ellen Straus, who was atten-
ding her first video Dance Safari
session. "I had a lot of fun and will
definitely come back!"
"The show is up and coming," said

Wendy Schecter, the program's talent
coordinator in charge of finding dan-
cers.
THE SHOW IS broadcast three times
each week, and Mittenthal says he
thinks it is one of the most popular
shows on Community Access television.
'There's a recognizable loose at-
mosphere transferred through the TV
screen," said South Quad freshman
Julie Cohen. "I like to watch others
release all that energy. It makes me
want to stand up and dance."
It is people like Julie who make up
what "Hasbro" calls the "criticism fac-
tor." Mittenthal and his cameramen,
director, audio person, and talent coor-
dinators said they are constantly trying
to improve the quality of the show and
viewer response is an important aspect
of that.
"PRAISE OR complaints as to the
mix, video effects, dancers, or shows in
general are taken very seriously, Mit-
tenthal said. "It helps us to improve our
techniques and, above all, shows that
people are watching.
The cameramen and director are
employees of the station
technical assistants are students in-
terested in film and video production.
The show can be seen on cable chan-
nel nine Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m. Thur-
sdays at 5:30 p.m., and Fridays at 9
p.m. Taping begins at 8 p.m. Fridays at
the fire station.
Prospective dancers can wear
whatever they like, but Schecter has a
valuable piece of advice for prospective
Safari Dancers: "Don't wear a leather
dress," she says, "because it gets too
hot under the lights."

1

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4

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--L-

In my job at the First National Bank of Chicago, I am
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It takes just three months of daytime study (six months in the
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RECRUITER ON CAMPUS: 4/06
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V beM ct-gn lt i
Vol. XCIII, No. 135
Wednesday, March 23, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
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OPEN 7
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Editor-in-chief .... . .
Managing Editor.
Opinion Page Editors.
University Editor.
News Editor ..
Student Affairs Editor
Arts Magazine Editor.
Associate Arts Magazine Editors.
Sports Ed itor ..
Associate Sports Editors.....

WE RENT TO 19 YR. OLD STUDENTS!
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BUSINESS STAFF: Roii M.AdanifDavid BanlApril

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