100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 20, 1983 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, March 20, 1983-Page 3

For a real tax break:

4"

free help on your return:

i. s

How 'bou t a belt? Daily Photo by JEFF SCHRIER
Sondra Loucks of the Mule Skinner leather shop joined the throngs in the Track and Tennis Building yesterday for the
5th annual 50 percent off Extravaganza. The sale ends at 6 p.m. today.

By SHELLY EBBERT
While many students spend spring af-
ternoons out on the Diag tossing a
frisbee or just enjoying the sunshine, a
few are stuck inside filling out income
tax forms-and enjoying it.
They're not filling out their own tax
forms, either. These 85 students par-
ticipate in the Volunteer Income Tax
Assistance (VITA) program offered
through Project Community.
HOUSED IN the rear of the Michigan
Student Assembly office in the
Michigan Union, the service helps
students and other area taxpayers
complete their rax returns.
The Internal Revenue Service started
the program in 1972 as an offshoot of
similar VITA programs around the
nation. The program is run by students
who have completed a four-week
training program which teaches them
to fill out the most simple tax forms and
to answer tax related questions.
The Ann Arbor program is "one of the
largest and most successful VITA
divisions in any university", according
to Mike Swanigan, director of con-
sumer programs for Project Com-
munity.
OTHER SERVICES the program
provides include a mobile unit to ser-
vice those who can't make it to the of-
fice. A group of advanced business
students to help people with more
sophisticated tax problems; and a
review service which gives patrons the
option of having their completed forms
checked over by a national accounting
association.
The program's volunteers are mostly

current or potential business school
students, but anyone is eligible to par-
ticipate.
First-year business student Greta
Werelius said that helping people is her
primary motive for working in the
program. "Sometimes getting money
back makes people's day." Werelius is
volunteering with the project for her
second straight year.
LSA SOPHOMORE Doug Graham, a
program coordinator said while some
volunteers are more concerned with the
program's appearance on their
resumes, "The majority of the people in
the program aren't interested in that. If
they were, they'd be in the business
school club and not volunteering," he
said.
Volunteers begin working in January,
and must attend training classes three
hours per week for four weeks, where
they learn the basics of taxes. Even so,
the first week or so in the office can be a
bit scary, according to many volun-
teers.
"(The class) could've given us more
hours for a practice session," Werelius
said, but she and other volunteers agree
'that the training teaches them
everything they need to know.
AFTER COMPLETING the session,
the volunteers must spend two hours a
week in the office from early February
through the tax deadline of April 15.
Instructor Rick Snyder, a tax
specialist for the Detroit accounting
firm Coopers and Lybrand, said the
program offers good experience doing
taxes, and also looks good on a resume.

A former participant in the program,
Snyder is a graduate of the University's
business and law schools, and is volua-
teering his services to the VITA
program.
VOLUNTEERS learn more from the
class than how to prepare tax return,.
First year participant Frank Schmi,
an MBA student, said that he has lear-
ned a lot about "the problems people
have," and about "the scope of tlp
recession."
"All of a sudden, people are in a new
situation-they're recently laid off., In
these new situations, there are new tax
credits. The service is good for thegi
because it may save them a couple'
hundred bucks," Schmid said. ,A
Some say that the program is even
better organized than it was in its i-
fancy, when the IRS was in charge of
the teaching. The IRS still provides
teaching materials, but Snyder said the
IRS is "a much over-burdened agency.
We're lucky, being here at Michigan,
because there are people here to run the
program without having the IRS in-
volved."

HAPPENINGS-
Sunday
Highlight
Have you ever wondered what Muffy's house looks like? Well you'll have
the chance to find out today when the University's sorority houses open their
doors for guided tours. Passes for the tours which will run from 12-3 p.m. are
$2 for adults and $1 for students and senior citizens. All procedes will go to
research for Lupes Disease. For more information and passes, contact the
Panhellenic Association.
Films
AAFC - Bebo and Khatabala, 7 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
CFT - Funny Girl, 6:15 & 9 p.m., Hill Street Theatre.
Performances
Sacred Music - Rossini's Stabat Mater, 9:30 & 11 a.m., First Presbyterian
Church, 1432 Washtenaw.
Reader's Theatre Guild - "As I Lay Dying," 8 p.m., Residential College
Auditorium, East Quad.
Ark - "The Golden Voice of the Great Southwest," Utah Phillips, 8 p.m.,
1421 Hill St.
Committee Against Recriminalization - The Untouchables, 9 p.m., Joe's
Star Lounge.
Museum of Art - The Grand River Singers, 2 p.m., Chandler/Pohrt
Collection.-
Music at Michigan - Voice recital, Terri Shaffer, noon; Chamber music
recital, 2 p.m.; cello recital, John Dunham, 4 p.m.; oboe recital, Meretta
Kristy, 6 p.m.; horn students recital, 8 p.m.; all in Recital Hall; "African
Music Instruments," 3 p.m., Rachham Amphitheatre; University Dance
Company, 3 p.m., Power Center.
Canterbury Loft - "Electronic Meditations," Mark Sullivan & ,Wayne
Gillis,"8 p.m., 332 S. State st.
Speakers -
Kelsey Museum - "Discovering Karanis: An Egyptian Town in Roman
Times," 2 p.m., Kelsey Museum.
Meetings
Gargoyle - staff meeting, 2 p.m., first floor, Student Publication Building
Miscellaneous
School of Metaphysics - Holistic Health workshop, 1-5 p.m., 209 N.
Ashley.
Extension Service - "Clinical Services for Infants Theory & Research
Practice," 11:30 a.m., Sheraton University Inn.
Racquetball - practice meeting, 9 a.m.-noon, courts 1-5, NCRB.
Aikido - practice, T. Blackburn, 6 p.m., wrestling room, Athletic
Building.
Human Sexuality - Gay discussion group, presentation on AIDS by the
Lamba Health Professionals, 6 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Russian & East European Studies - Piano Recital, Sedmara Zakarian, 8
p.m., Museum of Art.
Monday
Highlight
LSA, the English department, and the Women's Studies Programs are co-
sponsoring a lecture by Jane Gallop on "The Monster in the Mirror: The
Feminist Critic's Psychoanalysis." The lecture will be held at 4 p.m. in the
East Conference Room in the Rackham School of Graduate Studies.
Films
Cinema Guild - Japanese Film Series, 7 p.m., Lorch.
Performances
Guild House - Poetry Series, Gary Zebrun and Tish O'Dowd Ezekiel, 8
p.m., 802 Monroe.
School of Music - Faculty recital, oboe, Harry Sargous; percussion,
Michael Udow, 8p.m., Rackham Auditorium.
Music at Michigan - Piano recital, Jung-Ae Park Shin, 8 p.m., Recital
Hall; Percussion Students recital, 8 p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
Speakers
Center for Near Eastern and North African Studies - George Simmons,
"Policy Analysis for Population in Egypt," noon, Lane Hall Commons
Room.
Computing Center - Forrest Hartman, Introduction to Use of Microcom-
puters with MTS, 3:30-5 p.m:, 176 BSAD.
Alliance Francaise d'Ann Arbor - Joseph Sax, "Exploring the backcoun-
try of France: The regional and national parks," 8 p.m., Lawyers Clubs
Lounge, Law School.
Chemistry - Carlos Bayon, "Some Aspects of the Coordination Chemistry
of the Y-Aminothiols," 4 p.m., Room 1200, Chemistry Bldg.
Netherlands America University League - Cyril Lixenberg, "The Role of
Painting and Sculpture in Architecture," 8 p.m., International Center.
Faculty's Women's Club - Wilbur McKeachie, "The Center for Research
in Learning & Teaching," 11:30 a.m., Michigan Room, Michigan League.
Collegiate Institute for Values and Science - Horace Davenport, "Why
was Michigan's Medical School Anny Good?" noon, 4303A Medical Science
Bldg.
Meetings
SACUA -1:30 p.m., West Alcove, Rackham.
Senate Assembly - 3:15 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatr
F.L.O.C. Support Group - 3 p.m., 308 E. William.

1

Women must
learn to cope
with conflict,
Pollack says
(Continued from Page 1)
said the Senator, who was elected last
November.
Although she said she hasn't ex-
perienced much sexual bias since
taking office, Pollack said women
politicians do face an image problem.
"We don't have a free ride on our
image," she said, explaining that men
can often use their images to help them
get elected.
For examle, she said, a woman who
runs for office is sometimes seen as
neglecting her family but a male can-
didate can use his family to enhance his
image.
The most pressing issue facing the
state senate today is the tax increase,
she said. Without the increase, Pollack
said, public education in Michigan will
ultimately lose out. "Larger, longer tax
increases are needed for investments in
education," she said.
POLLACK warned against the use of
sexist language by both men and
women, especially words like 'girl' and
'gal' in reference to a women. "The
language used by both women and men
tends to infantile (women)," she
said.
Following Pollack's speech, career
fair participants were able to choose
from a number of workshops focusing
on career opportunities for women.
Panel discussions led by University
and local specialists ranged form sales
and marketing opportunities to politics,
the arts, and finance and banking.
The fair's coordinator said she was
pleased with this year's turnout. "It's a
nice reflection on the University and
the (Ann Arbor) community that
there's so much support," said Maria
Hunsberger.
Participants saw the fair as the chan-
ce to explore possible careers ideas.
"So many of my friends are not geared
toward careers," said LSA senior
Sheila Lunmis. "This day is very help-
ful because we're not in that mind set
yet."

I

INDIVIDUALTHEATRES
S A aLt 71700
$2.00WED * SAT * SUNDAY SHOWS
BEFORE 6:00 PM
"MAGNIFICENT"
NBC-TV
ACADEMY
AWARD
NOMINATIONS
INCL BEST ACTRESS
MERYL STREEP
SOPHIE'S
CHOICE
FRI MON -6:559:40
SAT SUN - 1:10 3:55 6:50 9:40

Ethics and medicine:
the proper diagnosis

(Continued from Page 1)
commodity, said Wikler. "The right to
health care derives from an obligation
to compensate for an unjust
distribution of income," he said.
OTHER TOPICS explored at the con-
ference included euthanasia, the
distribution of medical resources, and
fetal versus maternal rights.
The conference attracts medical and
other professors from throughout the
country to examine health issues which
are relevant today.
It is designed "to help people build
their own framework for making
ethical decisions," said Gwynned
Warren, a University biology student
and conference coordinator.
THE CONFERENCE combines the
technical, legal, medical, and ethical
aspects of the various topics. "We try to
avoid lofty philosophical discussions so
that the health care professionals will
see a connection between sitting at a
discussion group and being on the
ward," said Residential College
sophomore Michael Segesta, co-
director of the conference.
"Clearly you have to rely on some
philosophical principles in order to an-
swer the series of questions raised from
the topics. But the final question is
down to earth," he said.
Both Warren and Segesta said they
would like to see more medical students
involved with the conference. Of the 150
people registered at the year's con-
ference, half were undergraduates and
a third were health care professionals,
according to Segesta.

But Inteflex student Devan Sipher
said he thought the conference had
widespread applications. "The issues
raised are just as important for non-
medical people. They concern society
at large," he said.
The Committee on Ethics,
Humanism, and Medicine might have
to hold only one conference next year
because of a lack of funds, according
to Warren. (Presently there are con-
ferences both fall and winter terms.)

M-

_i

STUDY ABROAD
"COMPARATIVE
HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS"
The British National Health Service
9 July - 19 August 1983
5-6 University of Michigan graduate
or undergraduate Credits
INFORMATIONALL MEETING
TUESDAY, 22 MARCH 7:30 pm
International Center
(Next to Michigan Union)
For further details call: 764-9310/593-5520
- ---~ -I

MEN'S AND WOMEN S CLOTHING " CAR STEREOS " SPORTS EQUIPMENT
PLANTS 9 CAMERAS " WICKER FURNITURE " RUNNING SHOES " JEANS
DOWN JACKETS " SKIS " GOLD CHAINS " AUTO PARTS " ART PRINTS
STAINED GLASS LAMPS " JEWELRY " WATERBEDS
STEREO EQUIPMENT " LEATHER GOODS " OFFICE
SUPPLIES " MUSICAL EQUIPMENT
APPLIANCES " PET SUPPLIES
LEATHER COATS )) I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan