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March 15, 1983 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-15

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 15, 1983-Page 7

'Lovesick':

Symptomatic blandness

By Susan Makuch
I T'S ONLY logical to think that the
highest quality ingredients will yield
the best product possible. When you en-
ter the world of motion pictures,
however, logic might as well be thrown
out the window. Who could have
imagined 10 years ago that an
unknown, down-and-out actor named
Sylvester Stallone would become a box-
office champion due to a low-budget
film entitled Rocky? That movie had
no superstars, no already-proven direc-
tor or writer when it began production.
Well, a film called Lovesick does have
superstars, it does have a proven direc-
tor, and a very competent writer.
First of all, Lovesick was written and
directed by Marshall Brickman, a man
most noted for his collaborations with
Woody Allen (Sleeper, Annie Hall,
Manhattan). The next positive factor
about this movie was the employment
of Dudley Moore as its star. Moore is
not only considered one of the top box-
office draws (due to 10), he is also a
respected actor (due to his Oscar

nomination for Arthur). Other luscious
components in Lovesick include
Elizabeth McGovern, Alec Guiness,
and John Huston. But even with this
abundance of talent, all we get from the
finished product is an infrequently fun-
ny, often predictable film about
psychoanalysis.
Dudley Moore portrays a highly
respected New York psychoanalyst,
Dr. Saul Benjamin. He has a
beautiful wife, a lucrative practice, and
a bright future. Saul finds his life very
tolerable, as he is quick to observe. Just
around this time in his life, a very
energetic young patient (McGovern)
enters his world due to a bizarre set of
circumstances. He immediately falls
hopelessly in love with Chloe, a budding
playwright. Fantasies, criminal acts,
and nervous tension soon follow for Dr.
Benjamin. It matters not that Chloe is
invloved with an actor in her play; Dr.
Benjamin uses his position as
psychiatrist to discredit Chloe's lover,
hoping to take his place someday. He
also resorts to ridiculous measures in
order to discover more about her
feelings toward him. This includes such

childish acts as stealing Chloe's keys.
in order to get into her apartment. The
remainder of the film is predictable and
oft-times absurd.
As writer and director, Marshall
Brickman is most responsible for the
'failure of this film. It is the script,
however, that is the biggest problem.
The story of a man who jeapordizes not
only his marriage, but his career, all
for a schoolboy obsession, is un-
believable and trite. Perhaps if it were
presented with some sort of foundation,.
the tale would be believable. But as
Brickman writes it, Dr. Benjamin
begins his love (and lust) for Chloe just
moments after he meets her.
There are two primary elements
lacking in this romantic comedy -
romance and comedy. Other aspects of
the script that completely fail are the
sequences where Sigmund Freud
(Guiness) appears (through the fan-
tasies of Dr. Benjamin) to give Saul
some much-needed advice. The
dialogue in these scenes is insipid and
boring.
Wit is the target, but obviously

Dudley Moore plays a neurotic
psychiatrist in 'Lovesick.'

Brickman's aim is off. As a matter of
fact, each stage of Lovesick misses its
target. For example, Dr. Benjamin
suddenly gains a conscience by the end
of the film. He discovers that he can no
longer treat patients that don't really
need help. Then he decides to help
"the street people" by offering his ser-
vices for 251 per hour. All these
revelations occur without any specific
instigation. Brickman is trying to con-
vey too much in too little a movie. The
vast problems and concerns of
psychoanalysis have filled volumes of
texts; it is next to impossible to deal
with all of them in one film. ;
Another failure on Brickman's part is
the misuse of his talented cast. Dudley
Moore is once again portraying a
languid, sluggish character. Last seen
in Six Weeks, Moore played a boring
political candidate. His role in Lovesick
is just as tiring. Moore can repeat none
of the comic magic he performed in 10
and Arthur. In those films he had much
more to work with; in Lovesick he is
basically trying to save his skin, and it
shows. His performance is stilted and
forced.
Brickman* also wastes the obvious
skills of Sir Alec Guinness. After a
career that includes accomplished per-
formances in such films as Lawrence of
Arabia, Dr. Zhivago, and The Bridge on
the River Kwai (for which he won an
Oscar), his appearance in Lovesick is
terribly disappointing. His is not a
characterization of Freud, it is a
caricature.
TONIGHT 8 PM
A READING BY
ANDREW G.
CARRIGAN
POET
BENZINGER LIBRARY EAST QUAD

Elizabeth McGovern seems to come
out of this picture the least harmed.
That is mainly due to the fact that her
role is the least complicated. Her wide-
eyed, youthful zeal is rarely shaken.
Chloe thinks she has problems, but in
the end it is she who illustrates strength
and courage. McGovern, for being a
mere 21 years of age, has already
estiblished herself in the filmworld
with impressive performances in Or-
dinary People and Ragtime. This at-
tempt at light, romantic fanfare gives
her a little more screen experience, -if
nothing else.
When Lovesick first came to the
producers' attention, I'm sure they felt
it was a "can't-lose" situation : a
proven writer-director supervising
some of the most auspicious acting
talent around in a fluffy romantic
comedy. It's a shame that these ap-
petizing ingredients-failed to produce a
tasty meal.

Andrew Carrigan
poetry in motion

'S

By Coleen Egan
this in which the world sits
is still the world
when we reach to the moon
to mars
we ask worldly questions
and come up with worldly
answers
missing perhaps the
great nets that sweep the universe
for things bigger
than planetary systems
smaller than genes
WRITE WITH language now more
than ideas, although the poems are
-not devoid of ideas," says poet Andrew
G. Carrigan, "I concentrate on sound
more than anything else; it's part of
what words mean."
In Ann Arbor as part of the Writers-
in-Residence program sponsored by the
Residential College, Carrigan will give
a reading of his poetry tonight at 8:00
p.m. The program, made possible by a
grant from the National Endowment
fob the Arts , brings in writers, such as
Carrigan, to work with students in their
own writing, and to share their writings
with a university audience.
Carrigan's focus on language rather
than ideas stems from his belief in the
importance of the audience. He under-
stands that many people do not like
poetry because it's often difficult. He
-remembers in high school being
frustrated by the ambiguity of the
language in poems he read by writers

such as Andrew Marvell and William
Shakespeare.
"Their words meant many
things . : . they probably meant
everything," he says. "Words mean
more than one thing and not one
meaning over the other, but all." He
uses politicians' words as an example:
"They cover up what they're trying to
sell."
In his poems Carrigan is not
necessarily trying to cover anything up
through language. He tries to write for
an audience as broad and all-inclusive
as possible. "If you can read words you
know what is said and can decide
whether you like it or not." He hopes
this characteristic of his poetry will get
those people who never like poetry to
become interested in it and find it as
great a pleasure as listening to songs on
the radio.
Carrigan stresses poetry as an oral
art but makes note of the written
quality of it as well. He uses little pun-
ctuation and few capital letters because
he "likes the appearance of words on
the page" and also "because we don't
speak with capital letters and com-
mas."
The collection of poems in his recent
publication To Read To Read combines
new poems with selectedpoems from
four other collections he has had
published. The poems speak about
everything from the flu to ducks.
Carrigan is especially fond of writing
love poems. "My poems are likely to be
about anything," he says. "I'm pleased
and greatful when a poem does come
but I get the most pleasure from love
poems."
"What you live has a lot to do with
what you write," says the 48-year-old
high school teacher. Besides creative
writing Carrigan also teaches Bible
literature. The influence of his

THE DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS
ARE A GREAT
WAY TO GET
FAST RESULTS
CALL 764-0557

VOM w

Poet Andrew Carrigan (and friend). Carrigan will read works tonight in
East Quad's Benzinger Library at 8 p.m.

.--1oo

ESCAPE ALL
to the Movies DAY
TUES
ONE PRICE FOR ALL

'I

professional focus is illustrated in a
publication of some poems of his that
came out about a year ago under the
title of The King. It contains poems
about the two most well-known kings in
this country: Jesus Christ and Elvis
Presley. Currently he is working on
poems inspired by reading translations
of meditations on Jesus.
Carrigan's poems also reflect his
feelings about the present state of the
country. "Poetry is the art of showing,"
he says, "in that sense, what it means
to be alive, what is sort of lacking
today." He blames the political mood
on narrow-minded, dishonest, selfish
political leaders. This results in a lack
of poetry in the country. He says the
broad and generous consideration of
other people artists emphasized is no
longer here as it was in the '60s.
Carrigan thinks his poetry -
although not directly - intends to op-
pose the selfish atmosphere present in

the country. He describes his poetry as
giving off a generaous open message as
if it puts an arm around somebody and'
says "I'm telling you this because I
think you will understand."
In writing about any subject,
Carrigan gets a real pleasure; an ad-
diction is what he calls it. And although
Carrigan finds teaching and working
with kids and their writing helpful to his
writing, he would definitely like to be
a full-time poet if he could make enough
money. "That would be a terrific
definition of heaven," he says, breaking
into a broad smile.

. _

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MACHON L'TORAH - TORAH CENTER OF METRO DETROIT
presents:
Another series of stimulating lectures and discussions
on subjects of interest to Jewish adults ...
MATZCT-IC N jTf3
Date: SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 1983
Place: YOUNG ISRAEL of OAK WOODS
24061 Coolidge Highway, Oak Park, Michigan
Registration Fee: $5.00
FOR INFORMATION AND RESERVATIONS CALL

Bands battle, two are victorious

y Joe Hoppe
Aluminum. Beach and Resistance
Free beat out Epicurean and
Nighthawk to become the big winners
in the culmination of the Michigras Bat-
tle, of the Bands Saturday. They'll get to
play at the Second Chance Tuesday,
March 22, as their prize. In no connec-
tion with the band battle, Aluminum
Beach will be playing at Joe's Star
Lounge tonight.
- Aluminum Beach is John Krivit, lead
vocals and rythym guitar; Tom
Spademan, lead guitar, vocals; Paul
Sullivan, bass, vocals; and Steve Whit-
craft, drums, vocals. They play poppy,
ska-ish originals and covers by people
like Elvis Costello, Squeeze, Smokey
Robinson, and Eddie Cochran.
Resistance Free is Bill Cowan,
drums, vocals; James Rasmussen,
bass, vocals; James Appel, guitar,
vocals; and John Rasmussen, guitar.'
They play fairly accurate rockabilly
and, again, 9ka-ish originals and covers
by Chuck Berry, Elvis Costello,
Squeeze, Berry Gordy, and Eddie
Cochran (though not the same as those
done by Aluminum Beach.)
WIQB's Randy Z., Prism Produc-
tions' Jim Cioe, and your . humble
Sold at RAGS TO RICHES: 1218 S. University
0-next to Campus Theatre
WALKMANS
Nt. Adw. OUR 000. [
FM STEREO Walkmans-...$62.90 $25.00
! A.. . .Cr. t .. IL- t*a ant **A

narrator, representing the Daily, were
Saturday's judges. Aluminum Beach
and Resistance Free came out tied for
first on my ballot, as they did for the en-
tire contest. They were judged 1-3 poin-
ts for audience participation, and 1-10
points on originality, -quality of sound,
and appearance. I scored them like
this:
Both bands got 3 points for audience
participation. The dance floor was
crowded. People screamed and clap-
ped.
Aluminum Beach got 9 points for
originality; their originals were the
best of Saturday's bands. Out of 15
songs, 7 were originals. Two favorites
were "My Advice" and "Fish and
Chicks." "My Advice" is a fine
rockabilly piece as good as one or two of
the Stray Cats' originals. The clever-
ness of the "Fish and Chicks" title is
sustained throughout that tune, all
about the choice between staring at the
walls, watching TV, or going to the bar.
Resistance Free got 7 originality
points, mainly because they didn't play
enough of their own songs. Maybe they,
just didn't make as big a deal of it. Two
songs stuck out, however. One was ska-
oriented, and the other was a great
tribal rockabilly throb called "Let's

Dance." It's the kind of song the Cram-
ps happily take over and twist.
Aluminum Beach got 7 points on
sound quality. The instruments were
fine, but Krivit's voice was really
lacking in some areas. Smooth Squeeze
and Elvis C. vocals were all right, but
when real power was needed for the
Blasters' "Marie Marie" or the Stones'
version of "Route 66 ," it just wasn't
there.
Resistance Free got an 8 for sound
quality. The band had it down, they
were together, and could summon a
wonderful old-rock jangle into their
guitars with ease. Cowan's vocals stood
out as exceptional, especially when he
had to do it all as he sat behind the
drum kit.
In the appearance department,
Aluminum Beach scored a 7. They were
wearing ties and suits Saturday, but
they should have stuck with the
Hawaiian motif. Krivit looked good in
the hat he occasionally donned, though.
No special effort was made to look one
way or another.
Resistance Free got an 8 for ap-
pearance. The ducktailed 'dos of the
guitarist and the drummer, not to men-
tion the leopard-skinned drums, were
what made it.

aA A*
2 INDIVIDUAL tMT t~
$1.50 TUESDAY
ALL SHOWS ALL DAYS
A COMEDY FOR THE
INCURABLY ROMANTIC
LOVES"J
DUDLEY
& MOOR E
(PG)
TUES-4:50,6:45, 8:30, 10:15
WED-1:20, 3:05, 4:50, 10:15
ACADEMY
AWARD
NOMINATIONS
INCL.
BEST ACTRESS
MERYL STREEP.
SOPH I E'S
CHOICE
(R)
TUES.-3:50, 6:45, 9:30
WED.-1 :00, 3:50, 6:45, 9:30

968-4835 / 968-1679

/ 545-0131

,OR MAIL TO: TORAH CENTER, 24786 Sussex, Oak Park, Michigan 48237

- PROGRAM -

1:00-1:15 p.m.
1:15-1:45 p.m.
1:45-2:25 p.m.
2:45-3:45 p.m.
3:45-4:15 p.m.
4:15-5:00 p.m.

Registration
"From the Despair of Egypt
to the Ecstasy of Sinai"
Workshop I
(your choice)
Workshop It
(your choice)
HAAGEN-DAZS
UNLIMITED - film strip
presentation: Matzo Baking,
the Seder, etc.
Symposium:
Ask the Rabbi

- WORKSHOPS -
1. Hagadah Insights
2. The Seder: Reliving the Past;
Projecting Our Future
3. Passover: Borscht and Matzoballs or
Wholesome Spiritual Nutrition?
4. Laws of Passover (Basic)
5. Laws of Passover (Detailed)
6. Taste of Talmud (introductory)
APA THY?
Learn, To Kick The Habit!

This program was made possible by Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Shenkman.

YOUR BSN IS WORTH ANOFIE 2OMISO
OFFICER'S COMMISSION
IN THE ARMY,
Your BSN means you're a, professional. In the Army, it also

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