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March 10, 1983 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 10-Thursday, March 10, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Third annual Michigan Da

By CHUCK JAFFE
With the Central Collegiate Hockey
Association finals set for Joe Louis Arena this
weekend, the league coaches are settling in for
the NCAA Championships and the long
recruiting road ahead.
The coaches did take enough time from their
busy schedules to complete the third annual
Michigan Daily Coaches Hockey Poll. This
year's poll includes the best categories from
the first two editions, adding Coach-of-the-
Year to the list. In order to win, a player must
have received at least two votes from among
the 12 CCHA coaches.
Best playmaker, Best shot
BRIAN HILLS
Bowling Green
Last season this two-time All-American led
the league in scoring with 81 points. This year,
however, Hills topped that mark, netting 37
goals and adding 56 assists to gain both the best
playmaker and best shot crowns. Hills, who
also shares smartest players honors with
Michigan's Ted Speers, was last year's best
stickhandler.
Best stickhandler, Best skater
BILL TERRY
Michigan Tech
The Huskies' fiesty center won skating

honors for the second consecutive year, taking
the stickhandler award away from Hills.
Terry, a junior, scored 19 goals and 29 assists
for fourth-place Michigan Tech. Last season
Terry won best skater and most colorful player
honors, making him the poll's second-
winningest player ever.
Smartest player
BRIAN HILLS, TED SPEERS
Bowling Green, Michigan
Michigan's Speers and Bowling Green's Hills
share the honors as the league's smartest
players. While Hills was busy leading the
league in scoring, Speers picked up 18 goals
and 41 assists, spending time playing both cen-
ter and defense. Speers, an Ann Arbor native,
was named United States Amateur Athlete of
the Year in hockey, and is hoping to play for the
1984 United States Olympic team.
Most colorful player,
Best penalty killer,
Hardest worker
BRAD TIPPETT
Michigan
This Michigan co-captain finishes his career
as the biggest winner in Michigan Daily
Hockey Poll history. Two years ago Tippett
won hardest worker honors from Western
Collegiate Hockey Association coaches. Last

season, worker and penalty killing titles went
to the Prince Albert, Sask. native. This season,
19 goals and 40 assists helped Tippett add most
colorful player honors narrowly edging last
year's winner, Bill Terry. The six career wins
make Tippett the hockey poll's most
decorated player, two wins ahead of Hills and
Terry.
Best defensive defenseman
KEN LEITER
Michigan State
This senior defenseman helped Michigan
State maintain the league's top defense, while
adding three goals and 27 assists to the offense.
Leiter, a two-time Spartan co-captain, easily
outdistanced competition on the coaches
ballots, while also gaining votes for the hardest
shot award.
Best on face-offs
PAUL COOK, NEWELL BROWN
Ferris State, Michigan State
Senior Paul Cook helped pull Ferris State
from an early season slump into the playoffs,
and had six outstanding duels with co-winner
Newell Brown. Brown, last year's best
playmaker, fell into a slump for much of the
season, scoring 16 goals and 24 assists, but is
still considered one of the league's premier
face-off men.

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By TOM NASH
That voice.
That garbage disposal grind which
conjures up the image of a middle-aged
racetrack bum, like the fellow who
stopped a certain Michigan graduate in
front of the WDIV channel 4 studios:
short, mussed up hair; unshaven face
with Cutty Sark on his breath; shirt un-
tucked with a beer belly protruding
where the buttons had popped open;
cheap cigar in shirt pocket waiting to be
smoked; and a salty dialect whose
profane language could only be ap-
preciated by a regular at a seaside bar.
"HEY ELI, you and I got that same
problem," he began in his Boston
brogue. "We both can't get that fraaag
out of out of our throats."
That fraaag...
Before his television debut two years
ago, Detroit sportscaster Eli Zaret

evoked the image of that gruff old chap
with his sandpaper pitch.
DESPITE THE impression they
create, Zaret's grating vocal cords
have had only positive ramifications for
the 32-year old sportscaster simply
because the resonant, raspy tones they
emanate are so ear-catching.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
FACULTY SALARY LISTINGS
$1.00 per copy
ON SALE NOW!

"I know my voice is different," said
Zaret. "But that's good in my business
because it's distinctive and attracts at-
tention."
Consequently, Zaret's voice has been
the vehicle which enabled him the
chance to showcase his broadcast
talents and achieve the star status he has
captured in the Detroit market.
HE STILL WORKS at ABC-owned
rock-n-roll radio station WRIF - the
place where his stock first began to
really rise - while performing his
duties as the weekend anchor and street
reporter for WDIV. Also Zaret's radio
reports air over ABC's AM station,
WXYZ.
Eli Zaret didn't plan on being a spor-
tscaster. The love of sports was always
there, and he did major in TV and
Radio at the University of Michigan,
but originally he had expected to work
behind the camera, not in front of it.

After graduating from Michigan,
Zaret worked at the University's TV
station and with Ann Arbor Cable TV.
He aspired to be a director, producer,
or cameraman covering sports until his
unexpected big break came in 1974
when John Petry, the Program Direc-
tor at rock station WABX, approached
Zaret at a party.
"HE HAD HEARD me talking and
just felt that he could make me into a
broadcaster because of my voice and
the fact that I could express myself
well," said Zaret.
Zaret moved from WABX to WJZZ in
1976, jumped to WRIF in 1978, and
arrived at WDIV in 1980 without any
prior television experience.
His unique voice, creative writing,
and strong opinions, all packaged in an
offbeat style of sportscasting - which
he describes as "intellectual" -
propelled him up the media ladder.
"The intellectual approach is to look at
an issue, rather than just give the
scores," explained Zaret. "To analyze
a situation in sports, a trend, a theory,
to go behind the scenes and look at what
made something happen instead of just
relating what happened. Howard
Cosell, whom I consider the greatest
sportscaster of them all, really
legitimized this type of approach. And
since I started out just doing commen-
taries and not sports news at WABX,
this style suited me well."
AND LIKE COSELL, Eli believes a
sportscaster should always express his
point of view.
"That's something you should do in
every sportscast," said Zaret. "Put

1
l
i
i
l

[lyhockeyPonl
[ardest shot edged Northern Michigan's Bob Curtis by one
vote, 6-5 (one coach abstained). The 5-10, 170-
LRK HAM WAYpound freshman wing got off to a fast start and
Michigan State withstood a second-half slump to finish with 26
artan winners, Hamway nosed goals and 22 assists, picking up hat tricks
inner, Jim File of Ferris State, against Notre Dame, Michigan Tech and Lake
mate Leiter and leading scorer Superior.
card. The senior from Detroit
il shot to hit the net 28 times, 96
reer. Upon completion of the Best goaltender
y will go to the New York RON SCOTT
rafted him in 1980. Michigan State
Scott wins the goaltending trophy for the
nderrated player third consecutive year, this time for compiling
A TH, KEVIN BEATON 803 saves while surrendering just 87 goals. The
ern Michigan, Miami junior from Guelph, Ontario won the award
se two players couldn't even unanimously last year, but lost one vote this
needed to win the category by year to Ohio State's John Dougan. Scott's 2.53
iath led Northern Michigan in goals-against average was .52 better than any
goals and 29 assists, while other CCHA netminder.
e league's top-scoring defen-
19 goals and 23 assists. Last Coach-of-the-Year
eter Wilson of Bowling Green,
ed man this season, gaining JERRY WELSH
Ohio State
No one expected a 25-8-5 season from the
Buckeyes, with the possible exception of Welsh.
Best rookie The Ohio State coach led his team to third placp
IRIS SEYCHEL in the CCHA, and a place in the country's top
Michigan ten teams. His career record, thru the playoffs,
race of the entire poll, Seychel is now 166-113-17.
Beaton Seyclel Scott Welsh
s many talents
yorslfino t.Jiw o ouse i?. n me from TV and radio. I have to keejg
ious cant bild y crediiiy then things in perspective. I reallize all this
peolewil wnttokno hw ou eeit could be gone tomorrow, but even if-
veni they disg w you it's a that happened, I think I've done enough
e; it's sehig to think a that I[could get a job someplace else."
its s mlatn If that unlikely event occurs, Zaret
This pst Zaret rched h will be able to reach beyond the
Stelevision-made facade and use his
zousefint it.Hss ueemAndcecommunication background.
onTirs '82, wich airedi before 'e It's the basic exposure, that's what
Detoi batsed intshiest pr-tgasee it's about," said Zaret. "When I went on
showleclipsedsitsthighetatings evertVfatI olthefir stmelacDVee's
and reaped as high as 70-percent shares'Twil r bealir eabW dthe
no question that the fact I had sat in
college classes, had bright lights in my
face, had to prepare a TV script, and
had the basic rudiment of what it's like
to be participating or acting on TV
helped. And I got that at Michigan."
ZARET CA'JTIONS students to
prepare themselves for disappointmen-
ts because that's part of the business. A
person must have resiliency, the ability
to bounce back from setbacks. Zaret
has endured those frustrations, and on-
ce they almost moved him to give up his
career.
"I was buried on the weekends at
WJZZ," lamented Zaret. "I wanted a
morning show and they wouldn't give
me one so I quit in August of 1976. Then
Zaret in October, I got my wish after
... distinctive vocals promising the program director a star
of the audience, which, in addition to interview every day. It just shows you
have to hang in there and fight and
the Tigers' early and midseason suc- believe in yourself "
cess, was also an undeniable tribute to Zaret has further advice for young
STILLscharTsaystheen't ,college hopefuls who often question
SL ..yh onwhether their studies and student

exposure overinf late his ego and tries to station work will ever pay-off because
keep things in perspective. "It's fun to their experiences are not represen-
have people recognize you on the tative of the reality of the electronic
street," said Zaret. "At one Tiger media. "When I look back at my career
game, about 500 people in the upper and see the jumps I've made, I realize
deck started chanting, 'Eli, Eli, Eli.' I it's all a progression of step-by-step,"
felt like a giant. But I have to remem- said Zaret.
ber that people are reacting not so So Zaret counsels students not to
much to me, as the image they create of discount their college training. "Don't
sell short the experience that you're
SECOND CHANCE getting if you think you're not really
PRESENTS AN doing all that much," advises Zaret.
ii "Because someday you're going to
have to call back on this information
you learned and you'll see it was a
THURSDA Y-SA TURDAY very important step of getting your feet
wet."
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