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March 06, 1983 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-06

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V-

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Page 8-Sunday, March 6, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Gophers gag 'NI',

88-75

(Continued from Page 1)
NOT KNOWN for its running game, Minnesota converted
Wolverine turnovers-mostly blocked shots-into fast-break
baskets. The Gophers were relentless, turning 3-on-3 and 4-
on-4 situations into baskets simply by filling the passing lanes
and outhustling Michigan down the court.
"Because of the blocks, everybody else came out and got
stronger," Frieder said. "Not only the blocks hurt us, but it
was how they led to so many easy baskets."
Minnesota stretched its lead to 14 at one point, but settled
for a 45-33 halftime advantage. Because of Minnesota's
pressure-zone defense, Eric Turner, Michigan's leading
scorer, managed only two shots in the half.
MINNESOTA WAS in control the entire second half,
despite the offensive emergence of Turner, who scored 14 in
the second stanza, but couldn't put the game away early.
After stretching the lead to 63-44, Minnesota's largest of the
day, Michigan scratched back. Freshman forward Butch
Wade hit three consecutive jump shots and Turner canned
another to cut the Gopher advantage to11 with 9:52 left.
"We though we had them under control," said Dutcher,
"but Wade hit three straight shots and got them right back
into it."
BUT THE WOLVERINES never did make a serious run.
A Turner jump shot with three minutes to go cut Minnsota's

MICHIGAN
MinFG/A FT/A R A PF Pts

A

lead to single digits, 77-68, but the Wolverines couldn't get
any closer.
Minnesota cruised to its eighteenth victory in 26 games,
and upped its conference record to 9-7. The victory was
crucial for the Gophers, who are fighting for a possible NCAA
tournament bid. Going into the game the Gophers were sixth
in the Big Ten, and the win moved them into a tie for fourth.
The loss dropped the Wolverines to 13-13 overall and 4-12 in
the Big Ten.
On the plus side for the Wolverines, McCormick's 24 points
were a career high. In addition he grabbed 10 rebounds and
was 12 of 13 from the foul line.
"I TRIED to work as hard as I could," said the 6-11 junior.
"Personal highs don't mean much to me now (with the loss)
but when I look back I'll probably be pleased with my per-
formance."
Tommy Davis led Minnesota vAith 22 points.
The Wolverines now return home for their final two
games-Thursday against Iowa and Saturday against Nor-
thwestern-and Frieder has not yet given up on coaching his
Wolverines.
"Our defense has to get better," he said. "I hope we can
return home and have some pride, and play well for the fans
at Crisler."

Henderson
Rellford
McCormick
Person
Turner
Jokisch
Wade
Pelekoudas
Tarpley
Team Rebounds
Totals

25 2/11 2/2 8
20 3/11 0/0 3
38 6/13 12/43 10
20 3/7 0/0 4
40 8/12 2/2 3
7 0/0 0/0 0
20 4/7 0/0 3
22 1/3 0/0 1
8 2/7 0/0 4
3
29/71 16/17 39

0
0
0
10
10
0
0
1
0

6
6
24
7
18
a
8
2
4

Brooks
Howell
Breuer
Wilson
Davis
Petersen
Wohler
Shasky
Skanes
Scott
Team Reliounds
Totals

MINNESOTA
MinFG/A FT/A
31 5/8 4/6
27 4/5 5/6
36 6/13 5/6
34 2/11 5/6
35 6/13 10/10
20 4/4 0/1
7 0/2 1/2
6 1/1 0/0
3 1/1 0/0
1 0/0 0/0
29/58 30/37

R
2
3
10
3
5
7
0
1
2
35

12 22 75
A PF Pts
1' 1 14
0 2 13
.2 4 17
6 1 9
0 2 22
1 2 8
1 11
1 1 2
0 1 2
1 012
13 15 88

E

Technical foul: McCormick.
Halftime score: Minnesota 45, Michigan 33
Attendance: 16,791

tull court
PRESS
TV's college hoop 'experts'.,.
.what do they know?
By JESSE BARKIN MINNEAPOLIS
TELEVISION BASKETBALL commentators sometimes infuriate me with
their continualhedging and their lacking "expert" opinions.
Yesterday on NBC's Big Ten Game-of-the Week, color man Fred Taylor
was talking about Ohio State guard Troy Taylor (no relation). "He may be
one of the quickest guards around."
What does that mean? Is he one of the quickest guards around? Are some
quicker? Or is everyone quicker? And around where? Around the house?
Why can't he just say "he is one of the quickest guards in the nation." That
would be a statement. It is not like he said "the quickest." Then he would be
smart in hedging his bet.
The other one I hear over and over, and which makes my sto n, is
"that- may have been travelling."
This genre of statement usually occurs after a player has tra ed (or
committed a foul, or whatever) but the officials made no call. Generally,
when a commentator makes this statement, the infraction has indeed been
committed, albeit undetected. Wh'y can't he just say "he travelled?" Is the
announcer protecting the referees? I wish I had a clue. After all, aren't these
commentators supposed to be experts? Hell, with all the replay equipment
and numerous camera views, a chi:mpanzee from the booth would know if a
player walked a couple of steps without dribbling.
But they aren't all bad. Three nights ago on the USA Network, former
Texas coach Abe Lemmons did the color for the Houston-Arkansas game. He
didn't hedge. He would say "he fopled him ... he travelled.. . the ref blew
the call." That is what television needs; honesty.
ESPN's Dick Vitale is a winner also. He offers no-nonsense, straightfor-
ward opinions. Dare to be obnoxious, that's probably his motto. But it works
because he is honest.
Some have labeled him a poor man's Al McGuire. If he is, I'd take poverty
any day. Something about Vitale's personality makes him likeable, while
McGuire, NBC's designated egomaniac, spends much too much time on
theatrics, and having the only right answer. Listen Al, your microphone
works fine, you don't have to scream. Also, it was refreshing, even cute, the
first time you used the terms "aircraft carrier. . . tap city.. . you can't play
man-to-man on an inbounds play because you're going to get burned." But
you play those broken records over and over again, and I cringe every time
you repeat your pet cliches.
So who is good and who is bad? Don't look for the answers here because I
don't have the space to rate the dozens of "experts" and play-by-play men on
the scene today. Besides, why should anyone listen to me, I'm no expert
either.
Keeping up with basketball announcers is an impossible job anyway. Bet-
ween the traditional networks, USA, ESPN, and other stations - such as
local Michigan and DePaul broadcasts - basketball junkies can watch two
or three games a night.
The biggest hazard caused by this plethora of televised games is that
programmers forgot that some of us have to study for school. How can one
study when the brothers of Phi Slamma Jamma are taking it to the Razor-
backs for the Southwest Conference title?
Perhaps the saving grace of all of this is that the NCAA Championships are
early in April. That leaves two full weeks to read and study everything we've
blown off all semester while listening to broadcasters butcher the very
English language we're studying.
Wimgs lose steam as
North Stars win 4-1

Buckeye free throws
sink Purdue, 76-65

COLUMBUS, (AP) -Fourteenth
ranked Ohio State sank 19 of 20 free
throws while Purdue managed only 13
of 25 at the foul line yesterday and it
helped the Buckeyes beat the Boiler-
makers 76-65 and remain in contention
for the Big Ten basketball title.
It was a big turnaround for the
Buckeyes who made only 15 of 27 foul
shots two days earlier and lost to
Illinois.
ELDON MILLER, Ohio State's
coach, was asked after the victory if his
players spent more time practicing
their foul shooting Friday..
"No, we shot less," he answered.
"It's a mental thing, it's not a repetition
of fundamentals."
Gene Keady, Purdue's coach, accep-
ted his team's free throw shooting
philosophically. .
"How are you going to change free
throw shooting? You can either shoot
them or you can't. We shot 300 of them
in practice last week," he said. The vic-
tory lifted Ohio State's league record to
11-6 with a showdown Saturday at In-
diana in the final regular season games
for both teams.
Mlichigan State 91,
Wisconsin 65
MADISON (UPI) - Michigan State,
sparked by the strong inside play of 7-
foot center Kevin Willis, yesterday
overcame a sluggish first half to down
the Wisconsin Badgers 91-65 in Big Ten
action.
The victory was the Spartan's fourth
in a row and left them with an even 8-8
record in the Big Ten and 14-11 overall.
The Badgers fell to 3-13 in the conferen-
Big Ten
Standings

ce and 8-18 overall.
THE INSIDE work of Willis, com-
bined with the long-range shooting of
freshman guard Scott Skiles, proved
too much for the Badgers in the second
half.
The Spartans broke the game open at
50-43 when Skiles hit a jumper and was
followed a three-point play by freshman
Patrick Ford. The Spartans stretched
their seven point lead to 19 with 7:28 left
in the game.
Willis led the Spartans in scoring with
20 points. Corey Blackwell and Ricky
Olson scored 18 points each for the
Badgers.
Georgetown 87, Vi lanora 71
LANDOVER, Md. (AP) - Seven-foot
center Patrick Ewing scored 21 points
and grabbed 15 rebounds yesterday to
lead 16th-ranked Georgetown past four-
th-ranked Villanova 87-71 in a Big East
Conference basketball game.
Georgetown, 20-8 overall and 10-5 in
the Big East, outscored the Wildcats 17-
2 in the first six minutes of the second
half to extend a 32-28 halftime advan-
tage to 49-30.

Al.Photo
Randy Breuer rises over Michigan's Tim McCormick during yesterday's 88-
75 Minnesota win. Breuer also dominated in other areas, scoring 17 points
and pulling down 10 rebounds.
Lakers pound Pistons:

By LARRY FREED
AND PAUL HELGREN
Special to the Daily
PONTIAC - Magic made the fancy
passes, Kareem made the sky hooks,
James Worthy made the fast break
jams and the Pistons made a game of it
- well. for three quarters anyway.
After holding a slim 86-85 third-
quarter lead, the Los Angeles Lakers
reeled off 11 straight points to start the
fourth quarter and breeze to a 122-108
victory over the Detroit Pistons in front
of 25,278 fans at the Silverdome. last
night.
"THAT MIGHT have been (our)best
game in a month," said Laker coach
Pat Riley. "We've had problems
sustaining the running game, but
tonight we had consistent play."

Laker rookie Worthy led Los Angeles!
with 28 points, many of them on vicious
slam dunks. Earvin Johnson added 21:
points, 16 assists and 10 rebounds and
Jamaal Wilkes scored 26 for the win--
ners.
Isiah ,Thomas played superbly
leading the Pistons with 30 points!
Detroit, which led 61-56 at the half,;
played well but could not contain the
Laker fast break.
"I thought our guys played very hard
tonight," Piston coach Scotty Rober-
tson said. "We let it get away at the.
start of the fourth quarter."
Detroit's fourth quarter slide may
have been due to fatigue, as they only:
got six points from their bench. Starters
Kelly Tripucka and Bill Laimbee4
scored 23 and 20 points repectively for
the Pistons, whose record f:ell to 28-32.

4

4

Indiana..........
Ohio State.........
Illinois...........
Purdue ..........
Iowa ...............
Minnesota ..........
Michigan State .....
Northwestern.....
Michigan.........
Wisconsin........

Conf.
W
12
11
9
9
9
9
8
7
41
31

L
5
6
7
7
7
7
8
9
12
13

Overall
W L
22 5
19 8
19 10
18 8
18, 8
18 8
14 11
16 10
13 13
8 18

B lue PaDaily Photo by BRIAN MASCK
Former Michigan grid stars Andy Cannavino and Anthony Carter pose here with their new head coach Jim Stanley at
the Pontiac Silverdome, home of the Panthers.

rj

THE. SPORTING VIEWS

C]j

By JIM DAVIS
Special to the Daily
DETROIT - Lately the Red Wings
have been playing their best hockey in
the third period. That wasn't the case
last night, however, at, the Minnesota
North Stars skated past listless Detroit
4-1 at Joe Louis Arena.
The North Stars got off to a 4-0 lead
early in the game and then played the
Wings defensively the rest of the night.
DETROIT COACH Nick Polano
thought fatigue was a factor in the loss.
"We've played an awful lot of hockey
(eight games in 14 days) and it showed
out there tonight," said Polano. "We
didn't make the good plays to get us the
goals. Whenever we had the good chan-
ce, he (Minnesota goalie Don Beaupre)
came up with a good stop."
The loss broke a four-game Detroit
unbeaten streak. The Wings are
fighting with Toronto and St. Louis for
one of two playoff spots in the Norris
Division. Both the Leafs and Blues were
losing late in their respective games
last night.
Minnesota opened the scoring

The North Stars scored a shorthan-
ded goal early in the second period to
put the game out of reach. With Bobby
Smith off for hooking, Mike Eaves
pushed the puck around Willie Huber
and just inside the left post for Min-
nesota's final goal.
Reggie Leach finally got Detroit on
the board at 11:14 of the second stanza
in a scramble at the front of Min-
nesota's goal. Leach slid it past
Beaupre for his fifteenth goal of the
season. The Red Wings dominated play
in the period, outshooting the North
Stars 13-3. Nonetheless, Detroit found
itself down by three goals late in the
game, just as it has in each of the last
three contests, when the Wings rallied
to tie two and win the other.
But this one wasn't in the stars.
SCORES
College Basketball
Michigan St. 91, Wisconsin 65
Ohio St. 76, Purdue 65
Indiana 67,Illinois 55
Nebraska 77, Oklahoma St. 68
Georgetown 87, Villanova 71
West Virginia 77. St. Joseph's 66

_

GO USFL! Football is a sport for all seasons

By MIKE BRADLEY
ERSCHEL WALKER, George Allen, and
Anthony Carter.
Gimme a 'U'-!
Tom Ramsey, Chuck Fairbanks, and Kelvin
Bryant.
Gimme an 'S'!
The Chicago Blitz, New Jersey Generals, and
Michigan Panthers.
Gimme an 'F'!
Spring and Summer Football.
Gimme an 'L'!
What's that spell? Headaches for housewives,
and euphoria for football junkies across the United
States.
It's the United States Football League, which
has been stealing all the headlinesby doing dastar-
dly things, such as signing the immature and
vulnerable Herschel Walker before the NCAA
deemed him ready to be pounded into the turf for

the awesome spectre of year-round football. No
sooner did the NFL season, with its hogs and killer
bees, come grinding to a halt than did the USFL
jump right into its training camps, which resem-
bled a Ringling Brothers tryout more than a
professional football workout.
Sure, there were early problems. The Arizona
Wranglers didn't have a coach until January 11.
The Boston Breakers' stylish helmet decals
arrived a little late, but had no earholes. The Bir-
mingham Stallions ran out of helmets in practice.
These are only minor snafus for the new league.
All great organizations have had little stumbling
blocks at their outset. However, not all have had
lucrative television contracts to guarantee each
team 1.2 million a year for the next two seasons.
The WFL, WHA, AAFC, ABA, and WTT did not
have the luxury of guarneteed revenues like that
every year, and that certainly contributed to their

with a gin and tonic and watch Kelvin Bryant slice
through the Oakland Invaders' defense while
losings20 pounds in the process.
The winners this season will be the fans. Foot-
ball is football, whether played by superstars or
not-so-superstars. If the world lusted for football'
only in its highest form, then highschool-football
would not be so popular. So, all systems are go'
with the new league and its large contingent of
NFL castaways.
As for the season itself, the Chicago Blitz and
New Jersey Generals should be the USFL's real
class acts. George Allen has done a tremendous
job with marketing a very good product, and his
efforts should be rewarded with a division title.
In the Eastern sector, Chuck Fairbanks"
Generals should run away with the division crown
thanks to Walker. The Philadelphia Stars, whose
offense is dynamite but whose defense is

I

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