100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 04, 1983 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Burford u
WASHINGTON (AP) - Anne McGill
8urford, administrator of the embat-
tIed Environmental Protection Agency,
s urged the White House to back
4way from its claim of executive
privilege and give Congress complete
access to all the disputed documents it
wants, close aides said last night.
x She believes the president's refusal to
do so is hurting his ability to govern the
country, the aides said.
"THE KEY is to restore confidence in
the programs. As long as there is a per-
ception by the public and Congress that
me information is being withheld,
at is going to be impossible to do,"
said one aide, who like the others
iefused to permit the use of his name.
r The aides' disclosures came on the
same day that two Republican
lawmakers urged Reagan to replace

rges documi
Mrs. Burford with a "politically in-
dependent person of nationally
recognized scientific qualifications."
SEN. RUDY Boschwitz and Rep. Vin
Weber, both of Minnesota, made their
request in a letter to Reagan, saying the
call for dismissal was not based en-
tirely on the current controversy over
EPA. The agency is now under in-
vestigation by six congressional panels.
The disclosures also followed by a
day a statement from White House
chief of staff James Baker that "at the
present time" there were no plans to
dismiss the EPA chief.
Burford, according to one aide, has
repeatedly urged her position on the
White House but has been rebuffed. She
plans to make the case again to the
president in person when he returns
from California next week.

ents release
SHE BLAMES "Poor guidance"
primarily from the Justice Department
for the president's position, aides said.
Up to now in the long-running dispute,
Burford has basically appeared to
stand shoulder-to-shoulder with the
White House. The most significant dif-
ference has been her advocacy of an in-
dependent commission to investigate
the agency and the president's refusal.
The aides' disclosure marks a deep
difference of opinion on strategy that
had not been known.
The White House on Wednesday said
all the congressional panels could have
access to the 70 or so disputed
documents on the same terms it worked
out with Rep. Elliot Levitas (D-Ga.),
chairman of a Public Works subcom-
mittee.

The Michigan Daily-Friday, March 4, 1983-Page 3
Art studentsfaculty seek
compromise on cuts

Burford
... claims Reagan is hurting himself

(Continued from Page 1)
take more non-art students into its clas-
es, but only if it is "given the resources
to do so."
BAYLISS TOLD the group they must
work to make their plight more visible
to the rest of the University community
in hopes of swaying the executive of-
ficers to a lesser cut.
"This (recommendation) is not
final," Bayliss said. "I have a hunch we
can get support if we just go out and get
it . . . We must enlist the support and
awareness of others who would
ultimately be affected and don't realize
it yet."
Students and faculty members were
cautious but optimistic about the
possibilities of changing the proposed
cut. "I suspect, based on the Natural
Resources review, that (actions by the
art school) are not going to have much
effect, but who knows?" said William
Brudon, an art school professor.
PHIL DAVIS, a profesor of
photography, also said he was not
"terribly hopeful" that the gestures of
students will have much impact. He
added that there is "some misconcep-
tion of the utility of the School of Art in
the Univers ty system."
Prof. Myra Larson said the Unvier-

sity is sending a negative message to
students. "We're saying to a whole
generation of students, "We don't think
art is important,' "she said.
Students are willing to give activism
a shot anyway. Suggestions to heighten
campus awareness of the art school's
problem ranged from staging "paint-
ins" on the Diag - where students
would set up easels to practice their
trade en masse - to weaving together
hundreds of one inch squares of
clothing on which the school will send a
message to the administration. Studen-
ts also plan to circulate petitions in.
support of the school and write letters'
to University officials.
"It will take a bit of time for these
suggestions to take effect," said Phil
Donavan, an art school senior, "but we
have to make one final effort. If (the-
executive officers) don't get it then, you
shake your head and deal with (the
cuts)."
The University's executive officers,
who will make the final decision on the
art school, will hold an open hearing on
the proposed cut on March 14, 6:30 p.m.
in the Michigan Union. The Regents
will review the administration's
decision, but they do not need to ap-
prove it.

is

Two in 'U' community die

Two former members of the University
community died this week.
William Stirton, vice president
emeritus and former director of the
Dearborn campus, died Wednesday at
his home in Ann Arbor. He was 79.
AFTER HOLDING numerous
positions in public education, business,
and civic affairs, Stirton became vice
president of the University in 1956, and
was named director of the Dearborn
campus that same year. Heguided the
Dearborn campus from 1959 until his
retirement in 1968.
Funeral services will be held
tomorrow at 2 p.m. at the Fontana
Funeral Home in Ann Arbor.
'University Engineeing Professor
Emeritus Julian Frederick died Mon-
day at University Hospital of com-
plications resulting from cancer.. He

was 69.
FREDERICK, who retired last year,
was formerly a professor of physics at
Brown University and came to the
University in 1940 as a research
associate in the Department of Physics.
He joined the mechanical engineering
faculty in 1957, where he became an in-
ternational authority on acoustics and
ultrasonic technology. He was a foun-
ding member and fellow of the
American Society for Nondestructive
Testing, a fellow of the Acoustical
Society of America, and a consultant to
the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
He is survived by his widow, Merian
Frederick; two sons, James and
Richard; three daughters, Constance,
Linda, and Carol; and two gran-
dchildren. Funeral services are
scheduled for 4 p.m. Monday at the Fir-
st Unitarian Church of Ann Arbor.

MICHIGRAS 1983 PRESENTS
ice Cream Eating Contest
Pizza Eating Contest
"Best Little Poker Player in Ann Arbor"

Research main factor

SIGN UP NOW
Deadline is Monday, March 7th
Contests are next week

Papal greeting
Pope John Paul II meets with chidren from the Polish community at the
Papal Nunciature yesterday during his visit to San Jose, Costa Rica.
>HAPPENINGS
Highlight
Ann Arbor activist attorney and feminist Jean King leads the first of four
weekly discussion called "Women's Lives: Conversations on How Women
Grow and Change." The discussions will be held at the Guild House, 802
Monroe, at noon.
Films
AAFC - Quest For Fire, 7 & 9 p.m., MLB 4.
CG-Last Tango in Paris, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Lorch.
MED - Reds, 5& 8:30 p.m., MLB 3.
Alternative Action - Slaughterhouse-Five, 7 & 9 p.m., Nat. Sci.
i South & Southeast Asian Studies - Sad Song of Yellow Skin, moderator,
John Whitmore, 7 p.m., Commons Rm., Lane Hall.
Performances
Musical Society - Belgium Chamber Orch., 8:30 p.m., Rackham Aud.
School of Music - Trombone Recital, David Gier, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Ark - Caludia Schmidt, 9 p.m., 1421 Hill.
PTP-"The 1940's Radio Hour," 8p.m., Power Center.
Speakers
Russian & East European Studies - Georges Hintlian, "The Armenian
Treasury in Jerusalem," 7 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Natural Resources - Jerry Benson, "How Do the Major Forest Industry
Companies Compare?" 3 p.m., 1040 Dana.
Anthropology Department - Martin Silverman, "Culture and Ideology: A
Nostalgic View," 4 p.m., 2003 Angell.
Meetings
Int'l Student Fellowship-7 p.m., 4100 Nixon.
Duplicate Bridge Club - No regular game today. Ann Arbor Knockout
Team Event in progress.
Folk Dance Club - Folk Dancing, 8 p.m.-midnight, teaching, 8-9:30 p.m.,
Dance Studio, third floor, 631 E. William.
Miscellaneous
Aikido - Practice, teacher T. Kuchida, 5 p.m., Wrestling Rm., Athletic
Bldg.
Tae Kwon Do Club - Practice, 5 p.m., Martial Arts Rm., CCRB.
Women's Athletics - Basketball, Mich. vs. Wisconsin, 7 p.m., Crisler
Arena.
Students for Hart - Kickoff for Sen. Gary Hart's campaign, 4 p.m., Con-
ference Rm. 5, Union.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., An Arbor, MI. 48109.
Want to Earn 8 Credits This Summer?
How about...
The University of Michigan
Summer Session
i .tnSlPe ,m

(Continued from Page i,
our willingness to provide the kind of
conditions for . scholarship, research,
and living that the top people require,"
says Alfred Sussman, dean of the
Rackham School of Graduate Studies.
If the University did not use a merit-
based system, Sussman says, someone
would get hurt. This could be a senior
faculty member who feels slighted for
not being rewarded for achievement or
a top young professor who would lose
out under a salary program based on
seniority.
The merit-based system also
provides monetary incentive for faculty
members to excel, Sussman says.
LSA DEAN PETER Steiner says
research carries considerable weight in
determining salaries because it makes
a profesor visible outside the Univer-
sity community.
"Both research and teaching play a
role, although in one sense, the rewards
are higher for research than for
teaching, because of the high national
visibility of a research scholar," he
says. "National visibility is very im-
portant in terms of what we call merit."
Some professors say the merit-based
system works at this University
because of the institution's emphasis on
research.
"For better or worse, we're in a
research university," says Prof. Frank
Stafford, chairman of the economics
department. "We (the department) feel
that the faculty member who is
teaching an undergraduate course is
going to do a better job if he has ongoing
research."
TEACHING, however, is considered,
says Stafford. Increased competition
for attracting top students and a decline
in federal research funds coming into
the University have made teaching
quality more important than it was 10
years ago, he says.
Engineering Dean James Duderstadt
says the merit-based program has been
"enormously effective" in keeping and
attracting faculty members who could
make much more money working in
private industry.
Until two years ago, salary increases

in the College of Engineering were
determined by seniority and whether or
not a professor held an administrative
position within the college.
SOME FACULTY members did not
support the switch to the merit-based
system, says Duderstadt. "Some
people were unhappy, as they felt it
should have been more of a cost-of-
living system of pay raise," he says.
Under the merit-based system, in-
dividual departments determine pay
raises, but the school or college's
executive committee and dean also
have considerable influence.
B'ecause salary decisions are made
by each department, pay increases are
more equal in some departments than
in others, says Steiner.
"SOME departments-have been more
egalitarian than others. The college
does oversee departmental decisions
though, and the college may urge the
department to pay more attention to
market forces in order to retain and to
attract professors ," he says.
Despite the University's attempt to
find a salary program that will please
everyone, some faculty members say
that in light of budget restrictions and
high inflation, merit-based pay raises
no longer seem logical.
"(In) recent years the money for the
(pay) increases has been so small it's
hard to make discriminations. t That
amounts to a penalty for everybody
against the cost of living," says History
Prof. Thomas Trautman. "The small
additional amount that might be given
for outstanding work in my department
is not so much greater than any
professor gets. It's really not something
to get excited about."
Other professors say the small in-
crease does not serve as an incentive
and has little effect on a professor's
performance. "A 3 or 4 percent in-
crease wouldn't really affect .(faculty)
performance, says one dental school
professor. "I listen to other people
complain, but I don't buy that perfor-
mance as a 'professor is based on
money. My performance hasn't been
based in any respect on my salary.

THIN KING
In the age of information technology, a company
-whose sales of $1.7 billion annually and whose
products and components extend from data acqui-
sition and information processing through data
communication to voice, video and graphic com-
munication - is making original thinking a reality
for their new graduates.
ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
March 15th
Electrical, Mechanical, Chemical and
Computer Sciences Engineering, Physics, Technical
Sales (EE, ME, CS) and Computer Science Majors
Make arrangements at the Placement Office.
SHARRF IS

CALL UAC FOR DETAILS! 763-1107
"NEVER TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING"

f

An Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F/H/V

J

village corner
601 5. FOREST 995-la
Mil ,/ °o(GA L)
LABATT'S
Extra Stock
2.25 plus dep. DAINT
.65 p
Squirt& H ires
2 Ltr.d(reg. &diet
19 ~25 plus dep.,,,

UNIVERSITY FAMILY HOUSING
APPLICATIONS ARE READY!
CHOICE VACANCIES ARE AVAILABLE OR
COMING UP FOR SPRING, SUMMER, AND FALL
FOR ELIGIBLE STUDENTS AND STAFF
MEMBERS WITH FAMILIES.
SINGLE GRADUATE STUDENTS MAY BE. ELIGIBLE
FOR DESIGNATED SMALL UNITS.
CHECK IT OUTI
Anyone who is now or soon will be eligible to move into
a University apartment or townhouse...
APPLY NOW... TO MOVE IN BEFORE JUNE 15
APPLY APRIL 11... TO MOVE IN AFTER JUNE 15
(or thereafter)
LOOK AT THE ADVANTAGESI
1. A COORDINATOR OF COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES
2. LOW RENT INCLUDES UTILITIES EXCEPT 'PHONE
3. ON-SITE LAUNDRY FACILITIES OR HOOK-UPS
4. ON-SITE MANAGEMENT AND MAINTENANCE
5. FREE BUS SERVICE FOR YOU AND YOUR FAMILY
6. FREE PARKING AT ALL LOCATIONS
7. NORTH CAMPUS - PROXIMITY TO N.C. RECREATION BUILDING;
CRFATIC1 IHIPAAVN1T AJAIL AR C. uI1 LOR1' PLAY.-

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan