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March 03, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-03

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4

Page 2-Thursday, March 3, 1983-The Michigan Daily

'U'might divest from 4fi rms
(Continued from Page 1)

Herbert said a change in personnel at the company
this summer had made him optimistic that the com-
pany would respond to University requests.
Yesterday, however, he said, "we have tried long
enough to get them to send information."
IN A LETTER sent February 14 Herbert told Car-
nation executives that the University would sell its
stock in the company if detailed information was not
provided in time for the April Regents meeting.
Dun. and Bradstreet Corp. has also failed to send
information to the University, Herbert said.
Responding to one of Herbert's requests for ifor-
iimation, Dun and Bradstreet representative
iiarrington Drake wrote that his company would not
submit to an "adversarial investigation" by the
,University.
HERBERT SAID he was only trying to clear up
*concerns about the company's lack of a special em-
ployment policy for blacks working in its South

African operation.
The University wants companies in South Africa to
have special employment policies to help train non-
whites for supervisory and technical positions in the
company, he said. The company did not supply the
University with details to prove such a training
program exists. "(Drake) was basically asking us to
trust him on his word," Herbert said.
Dun and Bradstreet has not affirmed the Sullivan
principles, and has not come up with effective sub-
stitutes for them, Herbert said.
AFTER CORRESPONDENCE this fall, Drake ap-
pealed to University President Harold Shapiro. The
letter protested Herbert's "bureaucratic
monitoring" of the company.
Shapiro wrote back last month to defend Herbert
and inform the company that the University was
going to recommend sale of its Dun and Bradstreet
stock.
Dart and Kraft Inc. refused to report to the Univer-
sity last year. They said in a letter that their small
size made detailed annual reports too costly and time
consuming.

DART AND KRAFT'S South African operation
employs fewer than 200 people.
Herbert, tshowever, said that the company's small
size is not a legitimate reason for failing to report.
The same operation reported regularly before it was
taken over by Dart and Kraft, he said.
Trane Co. has also failed to respond to several of
Herbert's requests for information. A letter from
January 1982 is the most recent written response; the
University has from the company.
AT THAT TIME a new manager for their South
African operations said information would be for-
warded after he had settled in.
Unlike correspondence to Carnation, Dun and
Bradstreet, and Dart and Kraft, Herbert's letter to
Trane did not warn of the University's plans to sell
stock in the company.
Yesterday, however, Herbert said "there is nothing
right now that would justify continuing ownership" of
Trane Co. stock.
The company was not warned in'the letter because
Herbert said he wanted to give them one last chance
to send the desired information.

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FOR APPLICATION FORMS WRITE:
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MADD- strives for
drunk driving reform

(Continued from Page 1)
pointed to the President's Commission
on Drunk Driving.
MADD is especially interested in
making its message heard in Ann Ar-
bor. Because the city is home for an
unusually large student population.
Snow said she feels it is a target area.
"There is a life expectance decrease
in the 16-to-24-year age group due stric-
tly to alcohol-related crashes. We want
to stop that. We need you young
people," Snow said.
THE DEATHof a child or young per-
son has triggered many to join MADD
- statements similar to Bob Sullivan's
really sting people like Mary Dye,
whose 20-year-old son, a pre-med
student at Western Michigan Univer-
sity, was killed by a drunk driver while
in Ann Arbor during winter break.
"The impact on the entire family was
tremendous," Dye said. "You never
get over it."
Even Sullivan has experienced a loss
to a drunk driver. His 17-year-old
cousin was killed in an accident in-
,volving a drunk driver four years ago.
"My parents really became protective.
It took about two years for them to get
over the loss," he said.
BUT MANY University students say
that the idea of driving afterthaving a
few drinks doesn't bother them too
much, despite the numerous stories of
tragedy many MADD members can
relate.
Correction
Former Humanities Prof. Howard
Segal and three other faculty members
without tenure have voluntarily
resigned from the College of
Engineering's Humanities department
since last year. Yesterday's Daily in-
correctly reported that the department
had been forced to reduce its staff
because of budget cuts.

Some students said they have few
fears about drinking and driving. While
at the University, they said, they rarely
have to drive after drinking, aside from
the occasinal quick ride from a bar or
party back to a dormitory or apartment'
(these short rides "don't count," ac-
cording to one student).
Marsh said his parents think they do
not have to worry about-him drinking at
school because he "walks
everywhere."
ORAH SLIMES, an LSA senior, also
says she has never driven while in-
toxicated in Ann Arbor. "I walk all the
time," Blimes said. "But at home (in
upstate New York), the closest bar is 14
miles away. When I was in high school,
we'd always carpool, and I made sure I
drove, because I didn't get that
smashed - except once. I was tipsy
and scared, driving on a country road.
I'd close my eyes, and the next thing I
knew I'd be a mile down the road.
"I was really surprised I wasn't in a
field somewhere," she said.
Other students say that after a scary
incident, they have had second thoughts
about driving after partying. "I won't
drive with anyone who's drunk
anymore," said LSA freshperson Lori
Pankey.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Two nuclear plant failures
blamed on poor maintenance
WASHINGTON - Federal officials yesterday blamed poor maintenance
for the unprecedented failure - twice within a week - of a New Jersey nuclear
plant's automatic safety system and expressed fear the problem could be
widespread.
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission disclosed that the system which
automatically shuts down a reactor when there are indication of unsafe con-
ditions had failed for a second time last week at Public Service Electric Gas
Co.'s Salem, N.J., plant. One of 'the breakdowns had come to light
previously.
Both breakdowns were blamed on the simultaneous failure of two circuit
breakers that, when either one is activated, insert control rods into a reactor
immediately to stop the nuclear reaction.
NRC officials acknowledged that the Salem incidents raise new questions
about quality control in maintenace programs at nuclear plants around the
country.
The second failure at the Salem plant last Friday and the 24 seconds that
passed before the control room operator shut down the reactor manually
could have caused a severe accident with possible damage to the reactor
core if the plant had been operating at full power, NRC officials said.
Germ link to infertility found
BOSTON - A common, easily curable bacterial infection appears tobe a
major cause of infertility and treating it may allow many childless couples
to have families, research shows.
The bacteria is often passed through sexual contacts and its symptoms are
so mild that most victims do not realize that they have it.
Dr. Attila Toth said about a third of all childless couples seen at his infer-
tility clinic at New York Hospital have this infection. His study showed that
when the infection is cured with antibiotics, 60 percent of the couples are
able to achieve pregnancy within three years.
The culprit is called T-mycoplasma or ureaplasma urealyticum,
which invades the genital tract in both men and women.
At least 15 percent of all married couples in the United States are infertile,
and Toth says, "It's my belief that at least half of all infertility cases are due
to infection, and a large percentage of these are due to mycoplasma."
Toth's study was published in today's issue of the New England Journal of
Medicine. A second study on the bacteria, directed by Dr. Gail Cassell at the
University of Alabama in Birminham, was also published in the journal.
West Coast storms kill 13
A Pacific storm stalled off the coast kept California under siege yesterday
with giant waves and mudslides splintering lavish homes and famous piers.
Thousands of people were routed by floods up to the rooftops in places.
The death toll from the West Coast storms that began over the weekend
rose to 13, with more than 50 people injured.
Rain, mud and rocks closed major highways and railroads and parts of
Arizona and Colorado were warned to expect up to a foot of new snow. Snow
was already higher than houses in parts of the Sierra Nevada.
In Santa Barbara the wreckage of luxury homes littered the beachfront
and the harbor was evacuated yesterday after waves from an "absolutely
awesome" storm pounded this usually tranquil city of palm trees and
Spanish tile roofs.
During the worst of the storm late Tuesday, breakers towering to 15 feet
tossed rocks, sand and debris onto flooded oceanfront streets and ripped
pilings from under historic Stearns Wharf. One crashed over the top of the
Santa Barbara Harbormaster's office, breaking gas lines and igniting
several small fires.
Salvador wants early election
WASHINGTON - The Salvadoran government, increasingly on the defen-
sive in its war with leftist insurgents, is considering moving up the date of its
next election - a shift the Reagan administration is encouraging, officials
said yesterday.
The Salvadorans have scheduled elections for a new president and
legislature in March 1984, but administration officials fear that the full
year's wait will contribute to political bickering that will hamper the war ef-
fort.
At the State Department, spdkesman John Hughes acknowledged that the
United States has talked with Salvadoran.authorities about the possibility of
advancing the election.
Asked whether such a movewould have the enthusiastic support of the
United States, Hughes said, "Yes."
Meanwhile leftist rebels yesterday rejected Defense Minister Joe Garcia's
appeal to lay down their weapons permanently to honor the pope's visit to
Central America, saying peace would come once Garcia was "in the
graveyard of history."
Carter urges Israeli withdrawal
Former President Jimmy Carter, on an unofficial Middle East peace
mission, met yesterday in Cairo with Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak and
U.S. envoy Philip Habib and called for the total withdrawal of Israeli and
Syrian troops from Lebanon.

The former president, who a day earlier criticized the Reagan ad-
ministration for not being "adequately forceful" in pressuring for troop
withdrawals, also met with Egyptian Foreign Minister Kamal Hassan Ali
and Prime Minsiter Fuad Mohieddin.
Carter, the architect of the Camp. David accords which led to the historic
peace treaty between Egypt and Israel, met Mubarak at his residence in
suburban Hiliopolis for a working lunch.
13be Mitrt-an Butg
Vol. XCIII, No. 118
Thursday, March 3, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
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Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
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0

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Dorm room robbed
Robbers made off with more than
$5,000 worth of property from a West
Quad dorm room some time during
spring break. Police said suspects pried
open the door to steal a stereo,
typewriter, camera equipment, and
jewelry. A report was not filed with
Housing Security officials until
Tuesday.

Il

I

11

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DAVID SPAK
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News Editor...................GEORGE ADAMS
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Associate Arts/Magazine Editors. LARRY DEAN
MARE HODGES
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