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March 01, 1983 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-01

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PIRGIM friends and

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 1, 1983-Page 5

foes battle over

By BILL SPINDLE
The University Regents had a stack
of 12,000 petition signatures dumped in
their laps Thursday by friends and foes
of the Public Interest Research Group
iii Michigan.
"From the petitions presented, there
appears to be more interest among the
campus public in seeing PIRGIM boun-
ced off student verification forms as a
means of fund-raising than in giving the
organization a stronger donation
system.
TWO MEMBERS of the Student
Committee for Reform and Progress
(SCRAP) - the organization that says
PIRGIM has an unfair advantage in its
use of University forms to collect
donations - said their group gathered
more than 7,000 signatures in their
recent drive.
PIRGIM is "a special-interest group
and they are using our registration
Wystem to raise money," said Raymond
Despres, a SCRAP Organizer. "Studen-
ts are tired of being hassled in

registration lines." '
Forrest Fernandez, another SCRAP
leader, also urged the Regents not to
renew PIRGIM's contract when it,
comes up for consideration this spring.
"WE ARE not out to get PIRGIM -
we want it to be fair," Fernandez said.
"We are running into the problem of
PIRGIM overpowering other (student)
organizations because of the Univer-
sity's cooperation."
PIRGIM members outnumbered
SCRAP supporters at the Regents
meeting, but the consumer
organization could claim only 5,200
signatures in support of their proposal
to strengthen their funding structure.
PIRGIM is asking the Regents to ap-
prove a system in which students would
automatically be assessed the $2 fee on
their tuition, but they could ask that the
money be refunded if they desire.
"PIRGIM has been severely ham-
pered by the present system. The
'positive donation' simply doesn't
work," said PIRGIM member Amy
Gibons. "All other &(University) fees

funding
are mandatory, placing the PIRGIM
fee at a distinct disadvantage."
A SECOND emotional campus issue,
divestment, also surfaced during the
public comments portion of the regents
meeting.
Dennis Brutus, an English professor
at Northwestern University and
political exile from South Africa, urged
the Regents to divest from companies
operating in his native country.
"I expect to return to my country
when it is free. I ask you not to prolong
the length of exile," lie said.
"THE CORPORATIONS in which the
University has invested are actively in-
volved in the apartheid system," he
said. "They supply the funds that make
oppression possible."
Brutus argued that if the real issue to
the Regents is a matter of profit, then
they should address the issue as such,
rather than claiming their investments
are aiding black South Africans.
University President Harold Shapiro
said the Regents will discuss the issue
at its April meeting.

^3.a...- ""----e
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CLEARANCE

w
3

Dean tells Regents
one-third cut too high

(Continued from Page 1)
most the school can handle.
A 33 percent , cut would force the
layoff of three to five tenured faculty
members, Crowfoot said, even if the
school cut its teaching assistants and
administrative and clerical staffs by
one third; did not replace professors
approaching retirement; and left
vacant the four positions now open in
the school.
BOTH FRYE and Crowfoot told the
Regents that they hoped to finish the
review as soon as possible. "The
prolonging of this is the most destruc-
tive part of the process," Frye said.'
Also at their monthly meeting last
week, the Regents created a new ad-
Ministrative post to coordinate the ac-
tivities of the medical school and the
rapidly-changing University hospitals.
The new vice provost for medical af-
fairs will report to the vice president for
academic affairs and provost.
I Three of the Regents opposed the
new position, on the grounds that the
new administrator likely will not be
worth the high salary he or she will
command. President Harold Shapiro
had said that the appropriate person for
the post could make in excess of
$100,000 per year.
"YOU'RE TALKING about a very
high-priced person and a high-priced
staff," said Regent Gerald Dunn (D-
Garden City). "I can't justify that in
these times."
Regent Paul Brown (D-Petoskey)
said the position would be redundant,
with existing administrative positions.
"We have a dean of the medical
school and a director of the hospital. I
don't see why they can't do the work of
the vice provost," Brown said.
But five other members of the board
agreed with Frye and Shapiro's conten-
tion that the vice provost would be able
to find enough savings within the $300
pillion medical school and hospitals
budget to make his or her high salary
worthwhile.
IN OTHER action concerning the
medical school, the Regents approved a
cut in first-year student enrollment by
30 people next year. The reduction is
part of a larger plan to cut enrollment

by 60 students and raise tuition as much
as $1,000 within five y.ears.
Medical school officials said the
reduction is needed to counter a lack of
state funds and to make room for more
students participating in clinical
programs at state hospitals.
The Regents refused to adopt the
second phase of the plan, saying that a
large enrollment decline might cause
the state to cut some of the University's
appropriation. They also complained
that the report they received was am-
biguous in points and did not fully ex-
plain the ramifications of an enrollment
cut.
By a 6-2 vote, the Regents decided to
adopt only the first year of the plan,
dropping enrollment from 237 to 207
students next fall. The remainder of the
proposal will come up for consideration
again later this year, after the Univer-
sity knows how the state reacts to the
enrollment cut.6
THE REGENTS also made official
last week what most administration ob-
servers have known for a long time:
Billy Frye is one step above the other
vice presidents. To his title of vice
president for academic affairs, the
Regents dubbed Frye "provost,"
making him second only to the
president in the University's ad-
ministrative hierarchy:
In one other action, the Regents ap-
proved the investment of up to five per-
cent of the University's endowment in
high risk/high return, venture capital
firms. The University will join with
several other investors in the Michigan
Investment Fund Limited Partnership
to make the investments.
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