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March 01, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-01

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4

Page 2-Tuesday, March 1, 1983-The Michigan Daily
EPA cleanups halted by politics

IN BRIEF

WASHINGTON (UPI) - Sworn
secret testimony from Environmental
Protection Agency employees indicates
political pressures may have delayed
cleanup of a California toxic waste site,
a congressman said yesterday.
"We have begun to develop testimony
which indicates that there may very
well have been political pressure or
political judgments used in connection
with Stringfellow (Acid Pits)," said
Rep. John Dingell (D-Mich.Y, chairman
of a House subcommittee investigating
EPA.
EPA sources said administrator An-
ne Burford delayed cleanup of the
Stringfellow site in Avon, Calif., to
damage the Senate bid of Democrat
Edmund Brown Jr. Sources also said
Burford (the former Anne Gorsuch)
stalled action on a Minnesota site to
divert attention from the Stringfellow
delay.
ASKED IF his House Energy and

Commerce oversight subcommittee
had found evidence of wrongdoing in
the EPA's toxic waste dump site
cleanup program, Dingell replied: "It's
not all smoke."
Dingell, whose panel has been in-
vestigating Stringfellow since summer,
said some allegations "have substan-
tial suppord in fact to them."
Dingell spoke to reporters before two
unidentified EPA employees testified
under subpoena in secret session.
Dingell, whose subcommittee began
last week taking testimony behind
closed doors from 36 past and present
EPA workers, said the panel would ask
those testifying about charges of
political manipulation at Stringfellow.
EARLIER, DINGELL charged the
embattled Burford has so mismanaged
the Environmental Protection Agency
that it is in "chaos" and public health
and safety are endangered.
Dingell released internal memos in

which EPA managers complained of
staff shortages and growing workloads,
and he blamed her.
"Her words are hollow, and the
public health and safety suffer as a
result," said Dingell, in a letter to Rep.
Edward Boland (D-Mass.), chairman
of an appropriations subcommittee. He
asked Boland to assure funds and staff
at EPA are allocated properly.
DINGELL PRODUCED a memo
from Edward Kurent, an attorney in
EPA's enforcement division, who left
EPA Friday for a job in Cleveland with
the multinational conglomerate, TRW
Corp.
"In spite of management efficiencies,
good policy and good intentions, this
program cannot continue even to tread
water without additional personnel and
support," Kurent wrote to EPA chief
counsel Robert Perry, declaring the
workload grows ever heavier due to
congressional demands for documents.

Dingell
.. . pressures halted cleanups

Computing station opens in Union

coimplete.
Stop by this week and ask why.
Theta Xi
FRATERNITY
S.University at Washtenaw

(Continued from Page 1)
NUBS," said Aaron Finerman, director
of the Computing Center on North
Campus, the University's computing
headquarters.
Other officials emphasized the
station's pleasant atmosphrere. "They
(the planners) were very concerned

with the human aspect of providing this
service," said Michigan Union Director
Frank Cianciola. "This is the first in-
stallation on campus where the users
have natural light." (NUBS is located
in a basement room and has no win-
dows.)
CIANCIOLA said he thinks the
facility will help to make the Union a
center of student life once again.
"One of the roles of the Union is to
make free time activity a cooperative
endeavor with academic study. This
computer center addition is a living
example of realizing that objective," he
said.
Students working at NUBS yesterday
said they looked forward to having an
alternative computing center. "NUBS
isn't a very pleasant place for students

to work. I think the atmosphere at
NUBS directly contributes to the ten-
seness that many computer and com-
munications sciences students feel,"
said one senior from that department.
OTHERS ARE hoping the new station
will draw people away from NUBS.
"It'll lessen the amount of people here
(at NUBS)," said LSA freshman Ruth
Riegelhaupt, who plans to continue to
use NUBS.
Students who decide to do their com-
puting at the new station will have ac-
cess to equipment similar to that at
NUBS.
The completed station will house
about 35 video terminals, six paper
terminals, and 12 keypunches, along
with graphics terminals, line printers,
and a card reader.

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Canham may try to stop
USFL recruiting at 'U'

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Brennan asks to argue against
Riley ouster before high court
LANSING - Former Michigan Supreme Court Chief Justice Thomas
Brennan said yesterday he expects the high court will permit him next week
to argue that the ouster of Dorothy Comstock Riley should be reconsidered.
Although Riley has declined to fight for her high court seat, Brennan - a
fellow Republican - is making it quite clear he intends to pursue the issue.
"While the court has not granted me leave to make an appearance, I have
every reason to believe that the court will as a courtesy to a former chief
justice extend me the courtesy of speaking," Brennan said.
"If they don't, I'm going to sit there all day. . . and all day the next day,"
he said.
A spokesman for Attorney General Frank-Kelley, who argued successfully
for Riley's ouster, had no immediate comment on Brennan's statement.
AT&T break-up upheld
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court, splitting 6-3, yesterday upheld a
court-ordered breakup of American Telephone & Telegraph Co. that will af-
fect everyone using a telephone.
The justices, in a brief order, affirmed a landmark settlement that will
bring major changes in how telephone services are provided, and may hike
the average customer's bill for local service.
The federal government, which requested fast action in the case, last year
settled its 8-year-old antitrust suit against the world's largest private com-
pany. But some states threatened to stall the reorganization on grounds it in-
terfered with their right to regulate utilities.
The AT&T divestiture means the giant concern will lose control of the sub-
sidiaries that account for two-thirds of its $140 billion in assets. They would
be reorganized into seven independent regional companies. At the same
time, AT&T gains new freedom to move into other electronic information
fields.
U.S. may uard Israeli border
WASHINGTON - Military planners are working on a proposal that would
help Israel safeguard its northern frontier against attacks while minimizing
the dangers to a bolstered force of American troops in Lebanon, Pentagon
sources said yesterday.
A key element of the concept, said to be favored by some members of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff, calls for using U.S. reconnaissance planes to watch for
infiltrators moving through southern Lebanon toward Israel.
"We should take advantage of our technology and do the things we do
best," said one source, who noted that the use of reconnaissance aircraft and
ground sensors could reduce the need for potentially dangerous foot and jeep
patrols.
President Reagan said last week that "this administration is prepared to
take all necessary measures to guarantee the security of Israel's northern
borders in the aftermath of the complete withdrawal of the Israeli Army"
from Lebanon.
Some members of Congress said Reagan would encounter trouble on
Capitol Hill if that meant a "major commitment" of U.S. troops in Lebanon
beyond the 1,200 Marines now on duty in Beirut as part of the multinational
peacekeeping force.
Steelworkers union makes
concessions in tentative pact
PITTSBURGH - The United Steelworkers union reached tentative
agreement with seven top steelmakers yesterday on a concessionary con-
tract aimed at preventing the faltering industry from losing more business
to foreign competitors.
Terms of the pact were not immediately made public. But union sources
who asked not to be identified said it included pay cuts of about $1.20 per
hour, the loss of one day's holiday per year, and the loss of one week's
vacation per year.
It also includes language on reinvestment of industry profits into moder-
nizing plants and equipment, sources said.
James McGeehan, a union executive board member, said the board was to
recommend acceptance of the pact by the USW's Basic Steel Industry Con-
ference, composed of local presidents who have the power to ratify contrac-
ts.
Gold prices plummet $100
NEW YORK - Gold tumbled to $401 an ounce yesterday for a loss of more
than $100 in a week, in a mass unloading by speculators and investors who
believe Arabs and the Soviet Union will have to sell gold because of lower oil
prices.
"Mass hysteria has taken hold and there's no way to reverse it until all of
the sellers are out," said Luis Vigdor, vice president at Manfra Tordella
Brookes bullion firm, said.
Betty Raptapoulous, metals analyst at Prudential-Bache Securities, at-
tributed the selloff to a "perception, it's only a perception, that Middle East
countries and Russia, which is a major oil exporter, would have to sell gold if-
there's a sharp drop in oil prices."
Raptapoulous said "it all depends on what producers do about the oil
price. If it comes down too sharply, people could start to worry about the
ability of oil producing nations, such as Nigeria, Mexico and Venezuela, to
pay their debt."
Three OPEC oil ministers met for an hour in Paris yesterday in a last-
ditch effort to reach agreement on a unified oil price cut within a week and

avert a $7-a-barrel drop by the group's powerful Persian Gulf producers.
01 be LtIpbian 19afi-
Vol. XCIII, No. 116
Tuesday, March 1, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through, Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $7.50 in Ann Arbor; $8 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syn-
dicate and Field Enterprises Newspaper Syndicate.
News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 763-0375; Circulation,
764-0558; Classified Advertising, 764-0554; Billing, 764-0550.

14

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(Continued from Page 1)
claim.
"I'VE VISITED Marcus 10 times the
last three weeks and that rumor isn't
true," said Scott Hill, Oklahoma's run-
ning back coach.
An official from the Michigan USFL
franchise said that Schembechler and
Canham don't have to worry about the
possibility of a Wolverine under-
classman being signed. The Panthers
hold territorial rights to all Michigan
players.
"I WILL not talk to an un-
dergraduate, nor will I sign one," said
Michigan Panthers general manager
Jim Spavital. "I'm hard-nosed about it.
I think we can get enough good players
from just seniors."
But Canham doubts Spavital's sin-
cerity..
"The whole league said that
originally," said Canham. "If you can't
believe them on one thing, you can't
believe them on anything else. So
(Spavital's statement) would have no
bearing on what we decide to do. We've
heard that song before. When survival
enters into it, it's everyone for him-
self."
THE UPROAR that has accompanied
Walker's signing is far greater than any
previously seen after an undergraduate
turned pro in basketball, baseball, or
hockey. Explaining this, Canham said,

"One of the basic reasons for that is
that the NFL is the last bastion of
cooperation with the colleges. We have
been upset with basketball, baseball,
and hockey people for years."
Despite his disdain over Walker's
signing with the new league, Canham
admitted that the Heisman Trophy
winner gives the USFL added
credibility.
"It gives it credibility from sheer
publicity alone," said Canham. "It
gives them tremendous publicity. The
negative publicity, though, may play a
big part in the long run, because it's
just not right to take a player so close to
his degree off campus."
MICHIGAN'S OWN Anthony Carter
signed a $2.4 million contract Saturday
with the Michigan Panthers before get-
ting his degree - though he says he
plans to finish his last two semesters in
future off-seasons.
At his press conference Saturday,
Carter noted the boost Walker's signing
gives the USFL. "The Herschel signing
opened the dopr for other players to
play in the USFL since they see a
player of Herschel's caliber sign."
Schembechler, meanwhile, said the
USFL has opened something, but not a
door. "They've opened up a can of
worms that we may not be able to han-
dle, and I'll keep a sharp eye on the
USFL forever."
Subscribe to The
Michigan Daily
764-0558

4

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4

The Naval Ship Weapon Systems
Engineering Station,
Port Hueneme, California
Has Immediate Openings for:
ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS
If you will be graduating this year with a BS/MS degree in Electrical
or Electronics Engineering, we would like to talk to you about the work
being done by our staff of approximately 600 professional engineers in
such areas as tactical software, digital computers, missile testing,
launching systems, fire. control systems, radars, and test and evaluation
in support of U.S. Navy ships. Travel required in most positions.
Flexitime. Civil service benefits.
Our representative will be onF-,
campus to interview students on Fri., March 4 I
We are located next to the beach in the coastal city of Port
'Hueneme, only an hour away from Los Angeles and forty minutes from
Santa Barbara.
We would appreciate the opportunity to provide you with more
information about our work, location, professional training, travel
opportunities, and the benefits of career civil service employment. Sign
tin for an intArview with your PlacAmAnt DirAector NOW.

University of Michigan
READING AND LEARNING
SKILLS CENTER
Is offering 3 courses:
1. SPEED READING - $50
2. SPEED READING AND
STUDY SKILLS- 50
3. ACADEMIC WRITING-$6350

Editor-in-chief........................BARRY WIT
Managing Editor....................... JANET RAE
Opinion Page Editors................KENT REDDING
DAVID SPAK
University Editor................ FANNIE WEINSTEIN
News Editor .GEORGE ADAMS
Student Affairs Editor . .. BETH ALLEN
Arts/Mogozine Editor ..................BEN TICHO
Associate Arts/Magazine Editors.....LARRY DEAN
MARE HODGES

Doug Levy, Tim Makinen, Mike McGraw, Rob Pollard,
Dan Price, Paul Resnick, Scott Salowich, Amy Schiff,
Paulo Schipper, Adam Schwartz, John Toyer, Steve
Wise.
BUSINESS MANAGER......... SAM G. SLAUGHTER IV
SALES MANAGER .............. . .....MEG GIBSON
DISPLAY MANAGER....................JEFF VOIGT
CLASSIFIEDS MANAGER.... ........... PAM GILLERY
OPERATIONS MANAGER........LAURIE ICZKOVITZ
NATIONAL MANAGER ........ ...GITA PILLAI
FINANCE MANAGER..........-... .MARK HORITA
ASSISTANT DISPLAY MANAGER..NANCY GUSSIN
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SALES COORDINATOR.........E. ANDREW PETERSEN

Sports Editor................
Associate Sports Editors.....

SUSAN MAKUCH
.......JOHN KERR
.JIM DWORMAN
LARRY FREED
CHIUK J IAFFE

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