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February 18, 1983 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Cop Md
MIAMI (UPI) - A grand jury indic-
tment unsealed yesterday charged a
police officer with manslaughter for the
shooting of a young black man whose
death set off three days of racial violen-
ce in the Overtown ghetto.
The indictment, handed down by the
Dade County grand jury yesterday and
unsealed by Circuit Judge Gerald
Wetherington, charged Officer Luis
Alvarez with manslaughter, a second-
degree felony carrying a maximum
penalty of 15 years in prison.
Alvarez, 32, turned himself in shortly
after 2 p.m. at the Central Police
Station. He was booked and released on
his own recognizance.
ALVAREZ SAID nothing when asked
for comment. He and his attorney left
the station in a black Cadillac.

icted for shooting

The Michigan Daily-Friday, February 18, 1983-Page 9
USA Today to enter
Detroit paper market

The 18-member grand jury spent less
than a week investigating the shooting
of Nevell Johnson, 20, by Alvarez at a
video game room Dec. 28.
The shooting triggered a violent
rampage in Overtown. Three days
later, a second black man had been
killed by police, 26 people were injured
and more than a dozen businesses
damaged or destroyed.
ALVAREZ, WHO joined the Miami
police force on July 31, 1981, has been
suspended with pay since the shooting.
City Manager Howard Gary said
Alvarez and his rookie partner, Louis
Criz, left their assigned patrol in a
predominantly Latin neighborhood and
went to the game room without official

permission.
Black leaders said yesterday they
were "relieved" that Alvarez was in-
dicted, speculating violence would have
erupted anew if he had not been
charged.
"We are pleased that justice is now an
its proper course," said Ray Fauntroy,
leader of the Miami chapter of the
Southern Christian Leadership Con-
ference.
"There is no question that there
would have been more violence if he
wasigt indicted," he said. "If justice is
denied, people react violently. That's
the only way they think they can seek
justice. That's what happened in
December.

(Continued from Page 1)
"WE'RE CONTINUALLY trying to
do more to improve the paper," Shine
said. "If (USA Today) has a good in-
novation - one that makes the paper
more enjoyable to our readers - then
we will use it."
Despite the Free Press' changes,
USA Today and Detroit News represen-
tatives do not believe the national
publication will have much effect on the
Detroit circulation battle.
"USA Today has proven to be a
second buy in all its markets," said
Henry Chamberlain, the paper's media
relations assistant. "We haven't taken
away from circulation in any of our
markets. "
"I don't consider it a threat," said
William Giles, editor and vice-
president of The Detroit News. "They
don't cover one-tenth of what we
do. . . They will get a lot of readers out
of curiosity, but they have to hold them,
and I think they will be successful only
as a second paper, like a news

magazine."
USA Today's current national cir-
culation is 531,000, but the newspaper's
managers hope to reach 1.15 million
readers by the end of the year. To
achieve this, USA Today is running an
exhaustive publicity campaign to at-
tract a strong Detroit readership.
"THEY'RE DOING a good campaign
in Detroit, and they've got
(distribution) boxes all around," Shine
said. "I don't think it will have a major
effect on the newspapers in Detroit, but
the competition is stiff and no one wants
to lose any ground."
Chamberlain said he is not concerned
about the competitive challenges the
Detroit market presents for USA
Today.
"Detroit is a town that is news
hungry," he said. "We doa good job of
covering national news, sports and
business, and we will be a good sup-
plement to the two other papers.
(Detroit) is a natural place for USA
Today to be.

Alvarez
... surrenders after indictment

Draft law link to student aid spurs conflict
(Continued from Page 1)

repeal the original legislation, but each
k faces a tough battle in Congress.
Authors of those bills object to the
administrative burden placed on
college financial aid offices to im-
plement the law. The sponsors also con-
tend the draft law amendment
discriminates against college men who
need financial aid.
"It turns colleges and banks into
policemen, which we think is inap-
propriate," said Rush Holt, a
"spokesman for Rep. Robert Edgar (D-
; Penn.) the House bill's sponsor.
"The amendment requires a person
to prove he is a good citizen before
.acquiring federal benefits. It is a
presumption of guilt," Holt said.
A third bill will be introduced Thur-
sday to ask for a one-year delay in im-
{ plementing the law to give universities
a chance to prepare for the additional
paperwork.
Congressional observers say this bill
has a better chance than the other two,
but all three face an uphill battle.
But the key to the debate over
registration and aid may lie a thousand
miles from Capitol Hill, where a Min-
nesota federal court soon will rule on
the law's constitutionality.
A suit filed last month by the Min-
nesota Public Interest Research Group
and the Minnesota Civil Liberties Union
on behalf of six anonymous students
charges that the draft law amendment
discriminates, violates due process,
and is self-incriminating.
Officials in Ann Arbor say they are
concerned with the administrative bur-
den of implementing the law.
The office will receive at least 20,000

financial aid applications for the 1983-84
school year and the additional paper-
work to check if a student's registration
will delay processing the forms, said
Harvey Grotrian, financial aid direc-
tor.
If a student doesn't have his letter of
certification from the Selective Ser-
vice, he must sign an affidavit that is
good for 120 days until the Selective
Service sends him certification.
That means the financial aid office
will have to monitor an application for
several months, Grotrain said, and no
funds can be dispersed until there is
proof of registration.
Another problem is verifying if a
student is exempt from registering,
-Grotrian said. He cited the example of a
student named Sandy White who could
say he is female on his application but
turns out to be male. The University
could be liable if it gave aid to a student
who -has misrepresented himself, the
director said.
The University's executive officers
are still considering how to react to the
bill and likely will bring it up for
discussion with the Regents next week,
Grotrian said.
"If (the University) jumps too soon,
we could regret it," said Robert
Holmes, assistant vice president for
academic affairs. "We want to ap-
proach it in a careful and thoughtful
way. We get so much money from the
federal government that we would hate
to see it put in jeopardy by an action
that is rash."
Some private schools, such as Yale
University and Earlham College in
Connecticut, announced that they

would provide loans at market interest
rates for students who were denied aid
because they failed to register.
Solomon's latest legislative proposal
is a response to that move, Grotrian
said.
The University of Michigan will con-
sider a similar program, he said, if
there is no threat of losing federal fun-
ds.
Executive boards at some other

schools have taken a firm stand on the
issue. The University of Wisconsin
adopted a resolution opposing the draft
law amendment based on the inap-
propriate administrative burden.
The University of Minnesota and
Macalester College filed Friend of the
Court Briefs in the Minnesota suit.
Minnesota's regents also passed a
resolution that opposes the draft law
amendment.

U-

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Vets rehash
(Continued from Page 3)
Bruce Newman, who now runs
Buster's Food Mart in Ann Arbor, was a
second lieutenant in the Marine Corps
during the Korean War and worked as a
forward air controller on the front lines.
Newman also praised the program's
realism, but said the series could not be
absolutely realistic in all areas.
Remembering some of his own
humorous experiences in the war'
Newman said, "In order to survive,
they had to do outlandish things - some
things that they can't show on TV."
FOR INSTANCE, Newman said,
during the winter soldiers had a com-
petition every morning to see who could
last the longest without going to the
latrine: It was usually covered with ice,
and once the first man warmed the
seat, "long lines would form."
Newman said the most important
aspect of the television program is the
universal experience which the charac-

M*A*

S

*H

ters encounter in a war situation.
Thanks to Watkins, Petrick, Marcus,
and Newman, Ann Arbor residents will
be able to celebrate the ten years of
MASH at the MASH BASH benefit to be
held at the Track and Tennis Building
tomorrow.
THE VETERANS offered their input
in creating a realistic MASH party to
benefit the University Hospital.
Proceeds from the party will go to the
hospital's travel program for kidney
patients. It will feature a MASH
character look-alike contest and a
video-tape of some highlights from the
series.

1

UNIVERSITY FAMILY HOUSING
APPLICATIONS ARE READY!
CHOICE VACANCIES ARE AVAILABLE OR
COMING UP FOR SPRING, SUMMER, AND FALL
FOR ELIGIBLE STUDENTS AND STAFF
MEMBERS WITH FAMILIES.
SINGLE GRADUATE STUDENTS MAY BE ELIGIBLE
FOR DESIGNATED SMALL UNITS.
CHECK IT OUTI
Anyone who is now or soon will be eligible to move into
a University apartment or townhouse...
APPLY NOW... TO MOVE IN BEFORE JUNE 15
APPLY APRIL 11... TO MOVE IN AFTER JUNE 15
(or thereafter)
LOOK AT THE ADVANTAGES!
1. A COORDINATOR OF COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES
2. LOW RENT INCLUDES UTILITIES EXCEPT 'PHONE
3. ON-SITE LAUNDRY FACILITIES OR HOOK-UPS
4. ON-SITE MANAGEMENT AND MAINTENANCE
5. FREE BUS SERVICE FOR YOU AND YOUR FAMILY
6. FREE PARKING AT ALL LOCATIONS
7. NORTH CAMPUS - PROXIMITY TO N.C. RECREATION BUILDING;
RECREATION EQUIPMENT AVAILABLE; CHILDRENS' PLAY-
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