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February 18, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-02-18

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4

Puge 2-Friday, February 18, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Advancement

Libya warns
U.S. troops to
keep out of bay

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports

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From AP and UPI
Libyan strongman Col. Moammar
Khadafy voted yesterday to turn the
Gulf of Sidra into a "red gulf of blood"
if the U.S. aircraft carrier Nimitz and
its battle group dare to re-enter the
disputed bay in the southern
Mediterranean.
In Khartoum, Sudan, President
Gaafar Numeiry conferred with
President Hissene Habre of Chad
reportedly to discuss "foreign threats"
facing the region, an allusion to war-
nings last week that Libya was massing
troops, armor and warplanes along the
Chadian border.
PRESIDENT Reagan has said there
are no plans to involve U.S. forces in the
region if Libya clashes with its U.S.-
backed neighbor Sudan, but that
American troops have a right to defend
EMU fears
(Continued from Page i)
Porter has said that he does not want
the council to consider program cuts
unless declining enrollment make them
necessary.
"PERMANENT reductions in
programs andtservicesvare not viable
alternatives to achieve the budget
plan," he said in a statement released
last week.

College
Grmduation Date

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themselves if fired on.
Two U.S. jet fighters conducting war
games from the Nimitz shot down a
pair of Libyan planes after being fired
on over the gulf in August 1981, and the
Nimitz and its battle group just com-
pleted another set of maneuvers there.
"Entering Sidra means an invasion of
Libya. The Libyan people want to live
as free people and won't accept foreign
occupation. The Gulf of Sidra will turn
into a red gulf of blood if anyone tries to
sail through it by force," Khadafy told
his Parliament in the Libyan capital of
Tripoli.
IN AN address carried by Libya's of-
ficial JANA news agency, he warned
that the U.S. Navy, operating north of
the Gulf of Sidra "forms a challenge to
the Libyan nation. The Libyan people
won't stand and watch idly if pushed too
far."
reductions
Buchanan said the council will look at
services and university efficiency but
will not review academic programs to
achieve the necessary cuts. "No per-
manent change is to come out of this
cut," she said.
The council is not sure if the ultimate
problem will be lack of immediate cash
because of deferrments or lack of
money because of actual cuts, said Ira
Wheatley, head of the Department of
History and Philosphy. "The basic
question is: How much is the reduction
going to be?" he said.
THE COUNCIL has not yet gotten in-
to the "meat of the problem," he said.
"All we can do is wait for the governor
to act."
Buchanan said the council's final
recommendation will hinge on Blan-
chard's proposed tax increase. If it is
approved soon, she said, state in-
stitutions will receive more money and
EMU's problems would be reduced.
the council has been asked to
recommend budget reductions by April
11.
Corrections
Peace Now, an Israeli peace
movement, was incorrectly identified
as a pacifist organization in a story in
yesterday's Daily. Gur Offer, who
represented the group on campus Wed-
nesday night, asked American Jews to
support the state of Israel but not
necessarily its present government, as
the Daily also incorrectly stated.
Virginia Nordy was incorrectly
quoted in yesterday's Daily as saying
"The basic problem is that (gays) have
asked me to give them some ad-
vice ... " The quotation shouldmhave
read, "The basic problem is that (the
administration) asked me to give them
some advice."
kinko's copies
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Factory use boosts economy
WASHINGTON-Factory use is up for the first time in nearly a year, and
fewer Americans are filing initial jobless claims, the government said
yesterday. The reports spurred wider agreement that the recession has en-
ded.
The new indicators followed President Reagan's claim a night earlier that
"as a result of the economic program we already have in place, the recovery
is beginning to flex its muscle."
There is far from universal agreement about who should get credit for
recovery-or blame for the long recession-but there no longer seems any
doubt the rebound is under way.
Commenting after yesterday's reports were released, private analyst
Allen Gutheim said, "Everybody's very upbeat all of a sudden."
Other officials and analysts had similarly encouraging comments after
Wednesday reports that showed industrial production rising a strong 0.9
percent in January while new housing construction was leaping a record 36
percent.
EPA staffer defies subpoena
WASHINGTON-Rita Lavelle, former head of the Environmental Protec-
tion Agency's much-investigated hazardous waste program,defied a House
supboena yesterday and was warned she may be held in contempt if she con-
tinues to defy "the will of the Congress."
Rep. John Dingell, (D-Mich), chairman of the House Energy and Com-
merce investigatins subcommittee, said Lavelle-who was fired by President
Reagan last week-will be given one more chance to cooperate with his
panel's investigation into the $1.6 billion "superfund" program.
If she still refuses to appear, he said, she likely will be voted in contempt.
"The patience of the committee is wearing somewhat thin," said Dingell.
"We will not tolerate acts which frustrate the will of the Congress."
Meanwhile Embattled Environmental Protection Agency chief Anne Gor-
such met with President Reagan yesterday as the White House and Congress
neared agreement giving a House panel access to disputed agency files.
Gary Hart to run for president
DENVER - Sen. Gary Hart (D-Colo.) announced his candidacy for the
Democratic presidential nomination yesterday, saying he wants to be a
people's president and help "break the grip" of special interest government.
Hart, 45, stood on the west steps of the state Capitol and told an en-
thusiastic crowd he wants to be a "president on the people's side." His
speech to about 800 people gathered under cloudless skies was interrupted by
applause at least a dozen times.
Hart joined Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Dalif.) as an official entry in the race
for the Democratic nomination. Several other candidates, including former
Vice President Walter Mondale, are scheduled to announ'ce next week.
"We now face a stark choice between national renewal or national
decline," said Hart, flanked by his wife, Lee, and children, Andrea and John.
"Our problems worsen while some retreat to an unfair past and others
debate old remedies and contend over shopworn policies."
Transfusions may help diabetes
BOSTON - Researchers have discovered that ordinary blood transfusions
will prevent juvenile diabetes in laboratory animals, and say it may
someday provide a way of eliminating the disease in humans.
The doctors found that a few transfusions early in life from a type of rats
that never get juvenile diabetes will completely stop development of the
disease in rats that have a genetic weakness for it.
The researchers cautioned, however, that more research is necessary
before doctors try this simple therapy to prevent diabetes in humans suscep-
tible to juvenile diabetes.
"We feel at the present time that we should not make the quantum leap
from rat work to human work," said Dr. Aldo Rossini. "But this could be a
plausible approach in the future."
The study was directed by Rossini at the University of Massachusetts
Medical School. It was published in last Friday's issue of the journal Scien-
ce.
Unlike the more common adult form of the disease, juvenile diabetes often
strikes its victims in early adolescence. It destroys the ability to make in-
sulin, a hormone necessary for the body to use and store sugar.
Police hunt fugitive in N.Dakota
ASHLEY, N.D.-A convoy of police officers swooped into this prairie town
of 1,200 people yesterday, sealed off the highways and searched several
houses in another futile attempt to capture an anti-tax militant accused of
killing two U.S. marshals.
An FBI agent accused "irresponsible" news reports of tipping the fugitive,
Gordon Kahl, 63, that the police were heading for the town about 10 miles
from the South Dakota border.
The convoy of about 50 to 60 officers left an FBI command center in
Jamestown just after dawn, warning reporters not to follow or risk being
stopped by state police.
The police rolled into Ashley before 9 a.m. and set up a command post
behind the McIntosh County Courthouse.
Authorities say Kahl was active in Posse Comitatus, a right-wing
paramilitary organization that opposes federal taxation.
Reporters who tried to follow the convoy were stopped at North Dakota
Highway Patrol roadblocks on the four main highways leading into Ashley.
But several reporters managed to get into town on back roads.
The FBI agent in charge of the operation, Richard Blay, said afterwards
he believed Kahl was there but fled when reports were aired that the police
convoy had left Jamestown.

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Vol. XCIII, No. 115
Friday, February 18, 1983
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Managing Editor........
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News Editor ....................
Student Affairs Editor.......... .
Arts Magazine Editor...........
Associate Arts Magazine Editors.
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