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February 17, 1983 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'U' decision on gay rights
to focus on military issue

Page 7-Thursday, February 17, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Dorm leaders urge

(Continued from Page 1)
approve the proposal, and if gays on
campus push for enforcement of the by-
law, the armed forces could be forbid-
den from recruiting on campus.
WHILE THIS situation is
hypothetical, law schools across the
nation have already faced the military
in similar conflicts.
One such incident flared up at the
University of Pennsylvania Law School
when school officials decided they could
bar recruiters from campus facilities
because Army recruiting practices
violated their non-discrimination laws.
The Army did not take this sitting
down. The Judge Advocate General of
the Army threatened to withdraw all
military contracts - including resear-
ch grants - from that university, under
a statutory provision dating back to the
Vietnam era which allows the military
tor withhold funds from any school
barring recruiters.
THE PRESIDENT of the University
of Pennsylvania suggested the law
school reconsider their policy, and the
ban was lifted, but gay rights activists
at Penn are not happy about it.
.University law professor Theodore
St. Antoine said that new Army
regulations will limit the withdrawal of
funds to the individual unit which bans
them from recruiting. If, however, the
action is campus-wide, then "the
University would be cut off," he said.
:A similar situation occurred at
Wayne State University, but the results
were a little different. According to
WSU law school dean John Roberts, the
niilitary is forbidden from using law
sdhool facilities to recruit.
RECRUITING HASN'T changed at
Wayne State, though. Roberts said that
the only change in the program is that
students have to arrange their own in-
terviews, instead of doing it through the
law school. Only about five students a
year will be affected, he said.
Roberts is not pressing the issue,
however. If the issue went to court, "the
Army would win," he said.
The University of Syracuse law
school, like Wayne State, has prohibited
recruiters from using its facilities.
"(THE BAN) will not have a
significant effect on our national
recruiting," said Capt. Johnny
Whitaker, a Pentagon spokesman. "In
terms of overall numbers, it wouldn't
have been cost effective to have pur-
sued this through the courts."
Captain Larry Pippins, Army
Recruiting Area Command for Ann Ar-
bor, said "in terms of actually actively
recruiting on campus --we don't really
do that." Most of the recruitment that
goes on in the campus area, he said,
goes through the ROTC program.
"Mainly we act for the University as
a referral service," Pippins said.
"ROTC graduates who didn't get a
commission from the Army or students
who have decided for whatever reason
that school is not for them come to us,"
he said.
Poli
fl tl N.
i .
SOeS
Stockwell evacuated
Stockwell dormitory residents
evacuated the building just before 7
p.m. last night after smoke was repor-
ted in a hallway. Ann Arbor firefighters
found an overheated motor in an
elevator shaft. There were no injuries.
Pedestrian robbed
A woman was robbed at noon

Tuesday while walking on the 200 block
of North Main. Police yesterday said a
male suspect in his mid-forties ap-
proached the woman and demanded
money. After removing the cash from
her wallet the suspect fled on foot.
-Halle Czechowski

COLONEL ROBERT Shellenberger,
chairman of the Air Force Officers
Education Program, said he does not
think the Air Force is going to change
its policy in the foreseeable future.
"ROTC is an academic program
which is essentially the same as a
department, but we're not under any
school or college," he said.
ROTC is also an academic program
which discriminates against
homosexuals, and would probably be
affected were the University to amend
its by-laws.
"OUR CLASSES are open to anybody
at the University," Shellenberger said.
"Certainly that would include any
students, but not necessarily as a part
of our program," he said.
The goal of the ROTC program,
whether Army, Air Force, or Navy, is
to commission officers into the respec-
tive military division, said Shellen-
berger. "They would have to be in com-
pliance (with military regulations'
barring homosexuals)," he said.
"It is a moral question," he said. "It
is important to promote the image of
the military. You should not have to
fear having these " people lead your
nation (in a time of crisis)."
Colonel Courte agrees.
"(Homosexuality) is something that is
not regarded by society as normal.
There are problems within the military,
where we really have a 24-hour day en-
vironment. People live very closely and
become very involved with each other,
particularly in a field unit. Because of
the nature of the military service,
homosexuality cannot be tolerated," he
said.

-}
Ifire alarm
By JODY BECKER
It's early Saturday morning, and
dorm residents are fast asleep. Sud-
denly a fire alarm rips through the
building, waking the students.
Instead of running out of the building,
however, some residents bury their
heads and try to get back to sleep, con-
fident the alarm is just a prank.
TO COMBAT this, a number of
residence hall presidents, worried that
residents would ignore a real fire
alarm, have asked the University's
housing director to install safeguards
on fire alarm boxes.
In a letter to Housing Director Robert
Hughes, the student housing leaders
said "Each time the fire alarm is
pulled, fewer students evacuate than
the last time.. . a real fire could result
in a great tragedy."
"(THE LETTER is) another attempt
to formally give (Hughes) an oppor-
tunity to recognize and take action on
this persistent problem," Markley Hall
President John Gould said.
Gould said University officials have
not acted because the cost of a
deterrent system, such as glass boxes
around the fire alarms is too high.
Hughes was unavailable for comment.
"Actually, I think any cost would be
small considering the lives that might
be saved," Gould said.
DAVE FOULKE, manager of housing
security, said installing glass boxes
over fire alarms would cost the Univer-
sity more than $30,000 plus labor for an
average of 12 alarms per building.
Foulke said he supports the housing
committee's rationale that "no price
tag" can be placed on fire safety

safeguards
measures, but resists funding an
examination to see if the glass covets
would be effective deterrents.
"The single best thing to prevent
false fire alarms would be to cut out
drinking," he said. "Ban keggers and
progressives.
FOULKE SAID there is a significant
relationship between dorm hall parties
and false fire alarms, and banning
drinking would have "a most dramatic
effect" in reducing the number of false
alarms.
Last weekend both South Quad and
Markley Halls were plagued by false
fire alarms. In the Markley incident,
the prankster called the Ann Arbor Fire
Department before sounding the alarm4
Fire Dept. Sgt. Dave Wilson said only
60-70 percent of the 1200 residents
evacuated.
"It's pretty damn scary," Markley
resident David Evans said, "you worry
about the one time it might be real
Most guys on my hall don't get up."
Stockwell Hall President Leslie Stead
said that while "(False alarms) aren't
as big a problem here, the boxes should
be less accessible to people just goofing
around." Stead said she signed the let-
ter because she believes most people
feel saving "even one life" is worth the
cost of a deterrent system.

Flip-flop AP Photo
Linda Carey carefully tosses a pancake in an effort to win the annual Olney
Pancake Race in England. The coveted International Trophy is a silver
skillet.

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