100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 11, 1983 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-02-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


r

I-

I

The Michigan Daily-Friday, February 11, 1983-Page 5
Conference focuses on economy

By SHARON SILBAR
and GLEN YOUNG
While former Presidents Jimmy Car-
ter and Gerald Ford fielded questions
from students and faculty at Rackham
Auditorium yesterday, policy makers
from across the nation argued about the
economy and social security at the
Gerald Ford Library on north campus
continuing the public policy conference
begun Wednesday.
Opinions differed not only on solutions
but also the causes of the problems, but
Carolyn Ruis-Smith, student co-editor
of the Michigan Journal of Political
Science, said "we need a conflict in or-.
der to get a higher level of discussion."
And there was plenty of conflict.
Former Secretary of Health,
Education, and Welfare John Gardner
said a major problem with the social
security system is "the attitude of the
young."

"We have to enable young people to
know that time and chance happens to
all of us," Gardner said. For this
reason, he said, it is necessary that
people have the security blanket of
social security.
Alberta Canada, a social security
administrator from Tacoma, Wash. in-
sisted that the level of disillusionment
in today's youth is the disillusionment
of young people who watch cutbacks in
-(education and job) assistance
programs. "Young people think that
even in their old age, the system won't
take care of them, she said.
Television writer, producer and
director, Norman Lear brought the
discussion to its next topic. Short term
goals versus the long term planning.
"This conference has to do with the
growing complication in this nation
with the short term, bottom line profit,
to the exclusion of what is good for the

country and business," said the sun
tanned civil liberties advocate.
The discussion was moderated by
Lidle Carter, senior vice chairman of
the National Urban League. Other
public figures included Wilbur Cohen,
another former secretary of Health,
Education, and Welfare; Matina Hor-
ner, President of Radcliffe College;
Esther Peterson, chairman of the
National Consumer League; = and
Douglass Cater, special assistant to
President Johnson and currently
President of Washington College.
Jasper Dorsey, an adjunct professor
of management at the University of
Georgia, said "I think we can say the
world's in a hell of a fix, but it always
has been."
"Our ancestors would look at our
problems and laugh. Their problems
were problems of failure; our problems
are problems of success," he said.
"Every generation likes to think their
problems are the worst and nobody has

experienced worse."
Some of the participants felt that ex-
ternal factors did not necessarily make
the economy worse, but certainly had a
hand in aggravating existing problems.
Walt Rostow, a special assistant to
President Lyndon Johnson and a
professor of political economy at the
University of Texas, blamed methods
of analyizing the economy for current
misunderstandings and misinter-
pretations of economic indicators.
"Economists of today are working with
totally outdate tools," he said.
"They're using methods of the fifties
and sixties."

U.S. proposes scrapping
all chemical weapons

GENEVA, Switzerland (UPI) - The
United States proposed yesterday the
destruction over 10 years of all the
world's chemical weapons and their
production facilities.
But there must be "systematic inter-
national on-site inspection" to ensure
all stockpiles and factories are
destroyed, U.S. delegate Louis Fields
told the 40-nation Disarmament Con-
ference.
He said progress on a chemical
weapons ban, under discussion at the
conference since 1977, had been preven-

ted by Soviet refusal to accept such in-
spection.
"The Soviet Union needs to demon-
strate, rather than simply profess, that
it is genuinely ready to work out and
accept effective provisions to verify
compliance with a chemical weapons
prohibition," he said.
The U.S. negotiator said the need to
ensure compliance is proven by "the
bitter experience of recent events in
Sverdlovsk, Southeast Asia and
Afghanistan."

-- - - - - - - ------------n-rrrrnnnnnrmnnnrrrr
FLIPPER McGEE'S i
STOKENS for$1
u ~&with Studnl..I
* I
1217S. University
b r r r r r r r rnrnrnrnrnrnrnrn n n n n n n n r r r = r r r r

I Beam me up Scotty AP Photo
This artist isn't really in as tight a spot as it looks. He is preparing a
tyranosaurus rex model for an exhibit at the Milwaukee Public Museum.
Ex-presidents Ford, Carter
make historical appearance

I'm really into living well. Wall-to-wall
posh. Woofers & tweeters every-
where, a houseboy, solar pool,
RUMPLE MINZE, a
two-star chef, &
other niceties.

Downtown

Ann rborSince 1 968
C*Quality Food
328 S Main& Cocktails
328 S, ,.ie

(Continued from Page 1)
conference, took time out to talk to over
1,000 students, faculty members, and
Ann Arbor residents in Rackham
auditorium yesterday.
ALTHOUGH THE presidents spent
Wmost of their hour in Rackham an-
swering students' questions, it wasn't a
typical recitation session. Students
wrote questions on five-by-seven cards
and Shapiro screened them.
Still, the reception for Carter and
Ford, a University alumnus, was a
warm one.
Although while in office the two for-
mer heads of state may have disagreed
on foreign policy issues, yesterday they
spoke like running mates.
BOTH MEN complained of
Congressional interference in foreign
policy decisions.
The two men angreed on issues con-
cerning the Soviet Union, China, and
the Mideast.
"I see, in the future, a constant,
tough, and peaceful competition bet-
ween ourselves and the Soviet Union,"
Carter said. "The Soviets have an in-
feriority complex bordering on
paranoia," he added, saying "we never
want to back the Soviet Union into a
corner where they think militarism is
there only way out."
Ford echoed these views. "We have
to convince the Soviet Union they have
a bigger stake in peace than they do in
war," Ford said. Citing the different
ways leaders are chosen in this country
and the Soviet Union, Ford said "Aren't
we fortunate we have our process, isn't

it tragic they have to suffer under
theirs."
The two men also evaluated their
respective presidencies regarding the
Mideast.
Ford said he did make "some head-
way toward a solution to Mideast
peace,"he said. But he had cautious
words about the role of the PLO, and
Begin. "The PLO must leave Lebanon,
and Begin must discontinue movement
in the West Bank and have some with-
drawal from theWest Bank," Ford said.
Carter also found fault with theBegin
government and called for pressure
from the U.S. "There are obviously
some obstacles (to peace in the
Mideast) including theBegin gover-
nments plan to keep land (in the West
Bank) in direct violation to the Camp
David Agreement," Carter said.
Sold at RAGS TO RICHES: 1219S. Univ.rsity
0-next toCampusTheatre
WALKMANS
Nat'l. Arr. OUR PRICE
FM STEREO Walkmans...... $62.90 .$25.00
AM/FM STEREO Walkmans . $89.90 $30.00
CASSETTE STEREO Walkmans $110.00 $42.00
Portable AM FM Cossette
Stereo Systems ........$233.50 $75.00
Full-feature clock radios .....$27.00 $22.00
Uaas t Liche

el-

A special place -
and a treat for any Valentinel

Rumple Minze?
Keep talking.,

Romantically cozy and warm with the lovely continental
music of Kenneth Schmidt and his accordion. Friday and
Saturday evenings, 7:00 p.m. For a beautiful beginning-
cocktails and delicious pats. After a luncheon or dinner of
of our elegantly prepared crepes, try a sweet ending. Enjoy a
delectable torte or other taste-tempting pastry. Reservations
suggested 668 -8300 (Closed Mondays)

Imported by WV Elliott Co. Sole U.S. Agent,
New Britain, CT U.S.A 100 Proof Peppermint Schnapps.
Enjoy in Moderation.

Give
for

your angel an Angel
Valentines's Day.'

TS. ELIOT: PRACTICAL
CATS
ROBERT DONAT - Music: Rawsth
SHAKESPEARE: TWENTY SONNETS
DAME EDITH EVANS

Save on these and many other
featured Angel recordings.

SALE
749
Cassette or LP

LA 7eJ

Save on this and many other
featured Angel Red Line recordings.
SALE 5.49 each
2 for $10
Cassette or LP

M sA MICHIGAN
STUDENT
ASSEMBLY
Is again sponsoring the
VOLUNTEER INCOME TAX PROGRAM
coordinated by
Project Community
- ~~
.. t-

Rimsky-Korsakov
SCHEHERAZADE
MUTI PHILADELPHIA
FOUR LAST SONGS
DEATH AND
TRAN SFIGRATION
KL^U TEN STED

PROKOFIEV
THE TWO VIOLIN
CONCERTOS
PERLMAN
B.B.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
ROZHDESTVENSKY
ASHKENAZY-PERLMAN DAL
HARRELL >t4
ai skBEETHOVEN:
Nutcracker "ARCHDUKE" TRIO
""" STEVE REICH
( L s e t f o r 1 9 9 8 ) F eR ~e C o B KE R s n
Casetee os LS
9 9 9nia Joei Acess
CassetteioroL

JOHN WILLIAMS'
SYMPHONIC SUITES
' THE EXTRA-
L. . TERRESTRIAL
CLOSE ENCOUNTERS
STAR WARS
London Symphony: National Philharmonic

I

SERAPHIM

February 12-14 only, get $1.00 off every
regular priced Angel album and cassette in
our huge selection. (Sale items not included.)
300 South State Street
(corner of State & Liberty)

Save on all Seraphim recordings
in stock. 4.59 each
SALE 2 for $9
Cassette or LP

ri

Lb I1

I

1Wll

i

I

I L

I

1

i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan