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February 10, 1983 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-02-10

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, February 10, 1983-Page 5

Social Security package
may incur future deficit

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WASHINGTON (AP) - A House sub-
committee wound up its hearings on the
Social Security rescue bill yesterday,
but a Democratic leader cautioned that
the $168 billion package to save the
benefit system from default was not
assured of passage.
Despite an accelerated legislative
pace, House Democratic Whip Thomas
Foley of Washington told reporters, "I
don't think the matter is all wrapped
up, packaged and delivered."
A HOUSE WAYS and Means sub-
committee was waiting for a revised
forecast from the Social Security Ad-
ministration on the system's outlook for
the rest of tis decade.
Rep. J. Pickle (D-Texas), chairman
of the Social Security subcommittee,
has said he is worried that the bailout
plan - which would save the system
$168 billion over seven years and wipe
out two-thirds of its long-run deficit -
might still leave the system vulnerable
to a shortfall in the mid-1980s.
Several witnesses before the sub-
committee also warned that

calculations on Social Security's debts
did not tell the full extent of the
system's troubles.
MEANWHILE, THE top Republican
on the House Ways and Means Commit-
tee, Rep. Barber Conable Jr. of New
York, said an intense lobbying cam-
paign by federal workers' unions
against covering new federal em-
ployees under Social Security may have
backfired. .
"The average American is now made
more aware that federal employees are
not covered and the average American
is very annoyed by it," Conable said.
"Americans are wondering why the
people who make the decisions about
Social Security don't have to pay."
The Ways and Means subcommittee
was told by Edwin Hustead, former
chief actuary for the civil service
retirement system, that keeping new
federal employees out of that system
would not affect its unfunded liability of
$538 billion.
BUT HUSTEAD said that without
new employees entering the plan, the

$100 billion civil service retirement
fund would run dry in 20 to 25 years
"although benefits will be paid for over
75 years."
He said Congress should consider ac-
celerating its payments to the
retirement system to keep it going.
Nearly four dozen other witnesses
were testifying during the final
marathon hearing, including Gerald
Facciani of Cleveland, representing the
American Society of Pension Actuaries,
who said he believes the National
Commission on Social Security Reform
and Social Security's actuaries have
underestimated Social Security's long-
range deficit.
They also made no attempt to ad-
dress Medicare's problems, noted Fac-
ciani, who said the retirement age
should be raised to 68 by the year 2004.

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The Michigan Daily

Daily Photo by ELIZABETH SCOTT

University atmospheric and oceanic science students Frank Marsik (left),
Paul Gross (center), and Jill Eriksen (right) check the charts during the
national weather predicting competition.
Mi l1 d ~1 - , ~ vI-

CB!
for
NEW ORLE
judge has told
maximum pun
court becauset
him censor the
report.
There was
punishment wo
be ordered.
THE REPO
dealt with fed
New Orleans
civil rights
vestigating the
U.S. Distric
tier, then sche
trial of the s
defense to b
report. He or

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contempt of couri
review the script to see whether he
ANS (AP) - A federal should ban it from broadcast. CBS
CBS he will impose the refused.
iishment for contempt of In a report filed Monday in the court
the network refused to let record outlining his private conferen-
script of a "60 Minutes" ces with CBS lawyers on Jan. 14-15,
Duplantier said he "had never before
no indication what the encountered such outrageous conduct
ould be or when it would toward the judicial system."
WHEN CBS refused to produce the
)RT, televised Jan. 16, script, Duplantier issued an order Jan.
eral charges that seven 14 that it not be broadcast. He was
policement violated the quickly reversed by the 5th U.S. Circuit
of blacks while in- Court of Appeals. Then he issued an or-
murder of a policeman. der banning the broadcast in the Dallas
t Judge Adrian Duplan- area, where the trial was scheduled to
eduled to preside at the be held. That, too, was reversed.
even, was asked by the Postponed for a month after the
lock the "60 Minutes" broadcast, the trial is now scheduled
rdered CBS to let him for March 7.

r

Shakespeare's
PERICLES
FEBRUARY 15, 8pm
POWER CENTER
Tickets available
at PTP Ticket Office
call 764-0450

m cited

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
presents
I~ACTING COMPANY,

ratedfirst
By GEORGEA KOVANIS
Mother nature may determine the
weather, but a group of University
students are doing a pretty good job of
predicting what she chooses.
The University's weather
forecasting team, made up of twelve
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science
students, has been rated among the
top three teams nationally since the
University of Missouri began com-
pptition in 1976.
THIS YEAR, the team is currently
ranked first in the country, above
such schools as Pen State,
Massachusets Institute of
Technology, and team members ex-
pect to place first when the com-
petition is finished.
"We'll finish first in the nation in
cumulative team score," team cap-
tain Paul Gross said.
Twenty-two schools participate in
the annual competition, in which
students forecast the weather in
varous cities across the country for
eight two-week periods. Students
must predict high and low tem-
peratures, and the amount of
precipitation.
1-GROSS SAID error points are
assessed and the top five individual
socres are combined to determine
score for the team, which is then
srankednationally. Individuals are
U,also rated.
University team member Julie

y sion
in nation

r-
."..
,

,
'.

ol l

Hoffman is currently ranked fourth in
the nation, while other tea members'
ratings range from 17th to 68th out of
350 competitors.
"(The competition) is really
great," Hoffman said. "I don't
always think what I'm doing is right,
but if I'm number four I must be doing
something right."
ONE COMPETITOR, freshman
Steve Jascourt, said contest offers
him a chance to settle a grudge: "I
wasn't accepted by MIT, so I want to
beat MIT," he said.
Gross said the contest - which he
called "NCAA weather forecasting,"
is intense but casual.
"It's friendly but competitive," said
graduate student Bruce Marcus. "If
someone forecasts bad they get lots of
grief; if someone forecasts good, they
get lots of grief too.''
Most team members were en-
thusiastic about the competition, but
said it is sometimes frustrating.
"The only time I get tired of
(forecasting) is when I'm not doing
well," said senior Jim Slota. "I guess
you have to have meteorological men-
tality to do this."
The team has finished first three
times since 1976, and has placed
second and third once each.
But there have been close calls in
the past, Gross said. "Last year we
lost to Kean College in New Jersey by
.6 of a point."

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'U' Prof. on space panel

L2 INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
S A "t "u 0 E NDS
"VIDEODROME"

TONIGHT!
(R) AT 6:15, 8:05, 9:45

(Continued from Page 1)
For example, scientists have asser-
ted that by studying Venus, a planet
with a 700 degree temperature and a
nearly all carbon dioxide atmosphere,
scientists can learn how Venus
developed such a hostile climate, and
then apply that knowledge to the Ear-
th's carbon dixoide prblems called the
"green house effect."
Nagy said that this argument is not
necessarily a good way to argue for in-
terplanetary exploration, however, and
that space research is more an intellec-
tual exercise in what he terms a "pure
science."
"WE'RE TO draft space missions
which neither the US. nor the European
countriescould accomplish by them-
selves," Nagy said in an interview last
week. "Combining forces makes for a
valuable program in which something
better can be achieved." The missions
Correction
A photograph which ran on the front
page of yesterday's Daily was of Israeli
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir. The
Daily incorrectly identified the
photograph.

planned must not consist of anything
requiring a technological breakthrough
however.
"It's hoped that viable recommen-
dations can come out of the. commit-
tee's meetings, which. can possibly be
incorporated into the next federal
budget, so that a joint U.S. European
mission can become reality," Nagy
said.
Staying in the forefront of space
research would be advantageous for the
U.S., he said, cautioning that Reagan's
emphasis on defense does not
necessarily translate into more dollars
for the space program.
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