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February 09, 1983 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-02-09

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I

Page 8-Wednesday, February 9, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Cross country skiers
succeed sans snowfall

A tale of two leagues

By TIM MAKINEN
As Mark Twain once said, "Everyone
complains about the weather, but no
one seems to do anything about it."
The Michigan Cross Country Ski Club
has done something about it. Despite
the lack of snow this winter, the skiers
have pushed on and are currently in
the midst of one of their most successful
seasons.
WHEN THE club organized last fall,
many people turned out to join. In-
terest was particularly high because an
avalanche of snow had blanketed the
state the previous winter, and the
skiers hoped for, and expected, the
same this year.
To prepare for this season's grueling
races, the members ran with ski poles
through the Arboreteum and did ex-
tensive weight training. Everyone was.
ready. Unfortunately for the skiers,
Mother Nature did not wish to
cooperate-little or no snow fell in the
months of December and January.
"We were all gung ho," explained
team organizer Mike Muha. "But when
no snow came, everyone was dissap-
pointed, and a lot of people got out of
strenuous training."
BECAUSE OF of the lack of snow this
year, some members, including team
captain Marc Gallin, have hung up
their skis for the season. "I'm not even
racing this year," says Gallin. "I'm
just too bummed out about it."
Those members who stayed on, swit-
ched to alternate methods of training.
Many used the nordic-training machine
at North Campus Recreation Building.
The machine simulates actual skiing.
Others, including Muha, have gone
"roller-skiing" by placing wheels on
their skis.
Nothing, of course, can replace ac-
tual training on snow. As a measure of
just how good Michigan is, however, the.

team performed very well at their first
race, the Region III Championships in
Boyne Falls several weeks ago. "It was
the first time on snow this season for
several members," says Muha. "The
course was very difficult, and you have
to be impressed with them."
NOW THAT the club has several
races under its belt, the performances
have been tremendous. Last weekend
at the White Pine Stampede in Man-
celona, Michigan racers grabbed two
first places and a second place in
various divisions.
In the 20-kilometer race, Muha not-
ched the top spot for the 19-25 age group

Be a bgflshA.C.,
spurn the NFL
By BOB WOJNOWSKI
Let's talk fish.
Big fish, little fish, rich fish, poor fish and any combin-
ations thereof.
There are big, rich fishes in little ponds and small,
poor fishes in big ponds. And then there is Anthony Car-
ter, who purports to be a fish and, judging by his
elusiveness in recent weeks, has the slippery aspect of it
down pat.
The two ponds in question are the National Football
League and the United States Football League, big and
little respectively. Both are trying to hook A.C, but the
USFL has the bait in the water quicker. And, if Carter
ever gets around to making his decision, taking the USFL
bait would be the right one.

Don't do i A.C.
USFLis a joke
By LARRY MISHKIN
Despite its organizer's claim that the new United
States Football League would not take advantage of the
NFL by heavily bidding for top college players months
before the NFL draft, the new league has been offering
megabucks to some pretty famous college players.
These offers of large sums of money have been too tem-
pting for some college seniors to pass up, and they have
signed with the USFL without waiting to see what the
NFL had to offer.
Now, Michigan's All-American flanker Anthony Car-
ter must make same decision as the Michigan Pan- -
thers have offered the Wolverine star something close to
a million dollars for three years. I can only hope that

4

4

Carter
.. , to sign or not to sign

and 11th place overall with a time of
1:20:41. In the same race, graduate
student Sam James earned second
place in the 26-35 age group and fourth
place overall with a 1:17:25 finish.
Michigan's Linda Leeth left the rest of
the field back in the woods as she blazed
to first place in the 19-25 age group for
women. Leeth's time was 2:10:52.
Two Blue skiers also skied in a 50-
kilometer race, which was shortened to
43 kilometers because of, you guessed
it, lack of snow. "They were just happy
to finish," says Muha.
The club will participate this
weekend in the North American Vasa at
Traverse City. The Vasa is the second
largest cross-country ski race in the
United States, and some 1500 skiers,
many from abroad, could participate.
Because of the high degree of talent at
the race, the chances for a Michigan
skier to place are low, but the club
members are simply happy to ski. It
seems that nothing, not even, a warm
winter, can melt the Cross-Country Ski
Club's spirits.
Bowling
The Michigan Bowling Club managed
to pick up only four of 14 points last
weekend at Ypsi-Arbor Lanes. The
team won one game over Saginaw
Valley and another against Michigan
State.
"We all bowled like Jekyll and
Hyde," said bowler Chris Nesbitt.

The Michigan Panthers of the USFL are offering Carter fame, fortune and
superstardom - at least in their little pond. The NFL is offering lesser
quantities of the same.
If Carter were to join the Panthers, he would be the most recognizable and
popular player in the league. Instantly and without a doubt. You scoff and
say that stardom in the USFL is something to sneeze at. And, you know, you
jare wrong.
This is no World Football League, that polluted pond long since drained.
The USFL has money and, if it signs players like Carter, credibility. And
because of that, it can offer stars like Carter the house.
The NFL probably can't match the Panthers' offer money-wise. And
please don't fool yourself, it can't match the Panthers' offer fame-wise
either. Carter would be, at best, the 19th or 20th most-touted player entering
the NFL next year. The number on his back signifies his status in the little
pond.
But lest you think money is the sole deciding factor, let's talk health. The
only good fish is a healthy fish and Carter, who has been injury-prone
throughout his college career, would be dodging far bigger fish in the NFL.
there is no denying the fact that the NFL has bigger and better players than
the USFL - which means little Anthony stands a far better chance of get-
ting his gills ruptured in the big pond.
People say cliche things like the best should play with the best meaning, I
presume, that Carter should not swim away from the NFL with his fin bet-
ween his legs. That's macho and grand but it's like saying that the girls
shouldn't play with the boys. What a dull world that would be.
Carter has the chance to lay a league at his feet - and in front of the folks
who have cheered him madly for the past four years. Yes, he does have the
chance to be the Joe Namath of the old AFL - the man who leads the
fledlging league from the depths of
incredibility to the heights of
credibility.
In case you're still not convinced, I
think little Anthony should play in the
NFL, so there. But not yet. Use the
USFL as a training ground if need
be. If the league doesn't gain the
respectability it's looking for, Carter"
will be the highest paid minor leaguer
since Vince Ferragamo. He can
hone his skills in the USFL and then
jump to the NFL when his contract'
expires. Whole schools of coaches
would be baiting the free-agent Car-
ter should he choose that route after
a couple of years.
For sure, people will groan and
bemoan the selfishness of Carter
should he opt for the USFL. I mean,
he's ruining their chance to see him
go up against the best defensive
backs of the NFL. How dare he do
anything so rotten. For shame.
The bottom line is this: There's Bob Wojnowski (left) and Larry P
nothing fishy about looking out for Carter should sign with the Panthe
old Number One.

Carter refuses the offer and opts to display his talents in the more
established NFL.
Before I talk about the problems of signing with the new league, let's look
at any advantages that may exist with the USFL.
Obviously, a million is a lot of money, especially for a first year player.
There are not too many people who can afford to turn that kind of cash down.
Also, the owners of the Panthers claim that A.C. will become an instant star
in the new league, while he might only be a bench jockey in the NFL. Outside
of these two reasons I really don't see what else the USFL has to offer.
Now back to why Carter should forget the new league even exists. As long
as the USFL is so anxious to talk about money, let's examine the financial
situations that the two leagues offer. Sure a million dollars is a lot, BUT
what if this new league should happen to fold? That's an interesting question
and one that I'm sure guys like Larry Csonka and Jim Kiick, who skipped
town on the Dolphins to play in the World Football League, would be happy to
answer. If the league folds, Carter is left holding a check for a lot of
money-only no bank will cash it and he loses. He doesn't have to worry
about the NFL folding.
The USFL offers no long-term security or pension plan like the one in the
NFL. Break a leg playing for the Panthers and they stick it in a cast and, af-
ter your contract is up, wish you luck in the real world. All of a sudden that
million dollar offer doesn't seem as promising as it once did, and an NFL
career, with its guaranteed pension plan, is down the drain.
Enough about money though. Personal integrity and a feeling of self-
worth also have to be taken into account. That's not to say that the players in
the USFL don't have any self-pride, but let's face facts, they're either over-
the-hill NFLers or NFL rejects, with the exception, of the recently signed
collegiate stars. There's nothing impressive about being the top receiver in
this league.

4

Destination:

11

-
2137 W.
668-1985

Wherehouse
Records :

Stadium
1202 S. University
665-3065

On the other hand, becoming a
star in the NFL is an accomplish-
ment and would prove that Carter
really is the best. If he should flub
up one year in the NFL it's no big
deal because he's under contract
and no coach is going to get rid of a
top draft choice because of one
season. A team has an investment in
a top pick and will work with him un-
til he improves.
Playing for the Dallas Cowboys
has to be better than playing for the
Michigan Panthers (nothing against
Michigan).What if Carter is picked by
the Colts? Great, then he'll have a
chance to make a name for himself
if he can help turn their program
around. Carter playing in the USFL
is comparable to Ralph Sampson
spurning the NBA to sign a contract
with the Continental Basketball
Association. The best have to play
with the best and the NFL is the best
there is in football.

ALL OCCASIONS FOR
THAT SPECIAL VALENTINE
Bellygram or Shiekagram
Valentine Card Picture
With Every Delivery
Special Costuming
Belly Dancers Available
For Shows, Conventions, etc.
Male & Female Dancers
800-345-4567
517-349-2867
After 5:00
517-321-6181
Ask for Scarlet

Daily Photo by JEFF SCHRIER
Mishkin square off over whether Anthony
rs.

A

-I

The University ofMichigan Department of RecreationalSports

Y.

presents
SUMMER
SOFTBALL

Is Carter leaning toward NFL?

We Deliver

Anywhere

In The State

C GA Classics
Adult
Slow-Pitch Leagues
Mass Meeting February 24 - 6:00 p.m.
Room 3275
Central Campus Recreation Building
401 Washtenaw
CHOICE playing fields
CHOICE location/lights/parking
CHOICE umpires
CHOOSECUBC-Me, CD-Womens0
Sie or double header leagues
CHOOSE Reasonable Rates No hidden costs
CHOOSE No resdency reqirement No uners',
alli ation requirement
YOU HAVEA RIGHT TO BE CHOOSY
For Information Call Bill - 764-7415

DAYTON BEACH, Fla. (UPI) -
Negotiations between the Michigan
Panthers and Anthony Carter have
come to a standstill, leading to
speculation the Michigan All-America
wide receiver may want to wait for the
NFL draft before deciding on his
professional future.
Carter called officials of the new
USFL team at their training camp Sun-
day and broke off a planned meeting for
the third time.
Jim Spavital, general manager of the
Panthers, claims the package for about
$2 million his team is offering beats
anything the NFL would offer Carter by

a million dollars. The offer is for four
years and reportedly guaranteed.
"He's more valuable to the Panthers
than any other team in the country and
we recognize that," said Shire Roth-
bart, vice-president and treasurer of
the Michigan USFL team.
Carter initially asked the Panthers
for a $3.2 million package, including a
signing bonus of $700,000.
Man tle pulls a Mavs
NEW YORK (AP) - Hall of Famer
Mickey Mantle joined The Claridge
Hotel and Casino of Atlantic City, N.J.
yesterday in the capacity of Director of
UPI Top Twenty

Sports Promotion, and was promptly
ordered by baseball commissioner
Bowie Kuhn to give up his part-time
coaching job with the N.Y. Yankees.
Kuhn's decision followed a precedent
he set three and a half years ago when
he told Willie Mays to give up his long-
term post with the N.Y. Mets after he
accepted a casino promotions job at
Bally's Park Place, also in Atlantic
City. Kuhn said in a prepared
statement, "baseball and casino em-
ployment are inconsistent."
Mantle played 18 years in the
Yankees outfield, hitting 526 homeruns
and driving in 1509 runs.
AP Top Twenty

How many employers will pay your way
through school . . . and provide you an
opportunity for a good paying job when
you graduate?
Your GPA may be worth,
$
Check into the Army scholarships:
3- and 2-year:
* Full tuition
* Books
* Academic fees

HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF JOB OPENINGS
FOR 1983-84
HAVE YOU CONSIDERED THE U-M HOUSING OPTION?
The Housing Division is looking for well-qualified
candidates to serve in the Residence Halls as:

1. North Carolina (26) .....................20-3
2. virginia (6). .....................19-2
3. Nev. Las vegas (8).................20-0
4. Indiana............................17-2
5. UCLA..............................16-2
6. Houston (1)...... .................18-2
7. St. John's ..............................19-2
8. Missouri ...............................18-3
9. Arkansas ........................19-1
10. Memphis State....................18-2
11. Louisville ..........................19.3
12. Kentucky........................14-5
13. Georgetown......................16-5
14. viulanova ........................14-4
15. Minnesota............................14-4
16. (tie) Illinois State ......................17-2
Syracuse................................15-5
18. Purdue..........................15-4
19. Georgia ................................15-4
20. Tennessee..............................14-5

585
550
498
464
416
410
324
294
292
259
258
137
108
84
37
29
29
27
25
23

1. North Carolina (44) ....................20-3
2. Nev. Las Vegas (10)...................20-0
3. virginia (2) ...........................19-2
4. Indiana............................17-2
5. UCLA.............................16-2
6. Houston (2) ............................18-2
7. St. John's ..............................19-2
8. Arkansas . ...........................19-1
9. Memphis State.........................18-2
10. Missouri ........................18-3
11. Louisville .........................19-3
12. Villanova .............................14-4
13. Kentucky .................. .......14-5
14. Georgetown ...........................16-5
15. Syracuse............... .........15-5
16. Wichita State ..........................17-3
17. Illinois State .........................17-2
18. Purdue .......... ...... ..........15-4
19. Minnesota .............................14-4
20. Iowa ..................................13-6

1116
1104
1039
954
898
820
737
695
693
685
640
408
399
369
234
205
165
162
123
102

Resident Director
Assistant Resident
Director
Resident Advisor

Graduate Student
Teaching Assistant
Head Librarian
Minority Peer Advisor

Study in London, Summer of 1983
BRITISH NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE
Comparative Health Care Systems
sponsored by the Univ. of Michigan - Dearborn

There Will Be An
INFORMATIONAL FAIR

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