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February 09, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-02-09

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4

Page 2-Wednesday, February 9, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Fewer studej
SAN FRANCISCO - The cream of
America's high school crop is getting J can't beli
thinner, according to college entrance
xams, and university officials said tly less capq
yesterday there's reason for concern.
"These figures even shocked me
when I looked at them," said Stanford
University admissions dean Fred
Hargadon, a former chairman of the students scoring 650 or
!dollege Board, which sponsors the math section - down
$cholastic Aptitude Tests nationwide. mhs,-68
i:THE DECLINE in average SAT 93,868.
'4 ores has been well publicized and in- Over the same peri
tensively analyzed. "I'm not sure score slipped to 426 from
; nybody's paid as much attention to the bal section and from 484
Drop in top scores," Hargadon said in The highest possible sco
4n interview. THE NUMBER of stuc
r The number of students scoring 650 or test dropped by only
higher on the SAT verbal skills section Hargadon said studies
4topped 45 percent between 1972 and tests, if anything, may
1982 - from 53,794 to 29,236 - while easier today.
thiere was a 23 percent decline in "I can't believe stud

nts post high SATs

IN BRIEF .

eve students today are inheren-
able than they were in the past.'
- Prof. Robert Sawyer
Duke University

higher on the
to 71,916 from
od, the median
n 453 on the ver-
to 467 on math.
re is 800.
dents taking the
3 percent and
s indicate the
be somewhat
ents today are

inherently less capable than they were
in the past," Duke University Prof.
Robert Sawyer, who directs a summer
program for gifted high school studen-
ts, said yesterday.
"I think probably we tend to
overestimate the number of secondary
schools that are either equipped or
motivated to teach at a very high
level," Hargadon said.
HE AGREED that a growing number
of leisure activities create potential
distractions for students. "I also think

it's pretty clear that students are
required to do considerably less
homework than was the case 10 or 20
years ago," he added. "Homework in
many of the schools is almost unknown
now."
Schools also are under tremendous
pressure to save money and to be
egalitarian, Sawyer noted, which
means that programs for the few
students who would score over 650 on
the SAT are often cut to make way from
programs that benefit a larger group.
And schools are having trouble fin-
ding qualified teachers, particularly in
math and sciences.
"There are so many other professions
that are more attractive than teaching
these days and young women that
typically have gone into education are
not bound to go into education these
days," Sawyer said.

Panel says Israeli defense chief must quit

(Connued from Page 1)
;Special Cabinet meeting was scheduled
!or Wednesday.
State-run Israel radio said Begin told
Sharon that he would not be sorry if the
defense minister resigned.
COMPUTER TERMINALS
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However, the chairman of Begin's
coalition, Avraham Shapira, said after
meeting with Begin that the prime
minister would not demand Sharon's
resignation.
IN WASHINGTON, the White House
had no comment on the commission
report, which it described as an inter-
nal matter. On Monday, President
Reagan used some of his toughest
language yet with Israel, saying it was
unnecessarily delaying the withdrawal
of its troops from Lebanon.
The only Lebanese government of-

ficial to comment publicly was Moslem
Prime' Minister Shafik Wazzan, who
told The Associated Press the Israeli
commission's report "at least un-
covered to the world who was really
responsible." But the Israeli findings
were expected to have no effect on the
lagging Lebanese inquiry into the
slaughter by militiamen of President
Amin Gemayel's Christian Phalange
Party.
Fady Hayek, spokesman for the

Christian militia, said the com-
mission's report was a "purely internal
Israeli affair.
"IF THEY COME up with proof, then
we can comment," he added.
In the Sabra and Chatilla camps
where the massacres took place, sur-
vivors focused their anger on Sharon,
the architect of the Israeli invasion that
routed the PLO from Beirut last sum-
mer.

f
t
A4
4.
,.
.
4.:

Tonight there's
something special brewing
at U no's
OLYMPIA
PITCHER
AFTER 9 PM.
PIZZA BY THE SLICE-$1.00
DAILY 11:30-2 a.m. FROZEN AND CARRY
1321 S. UNIVERSITY OUT AVAILABLE
ANN ARBOR 769-1894
restaurant and bar

Kosher living plan

I

proposed j
(Continued from Page 1)
students who were forced to eat salads
all the time and are therefore not able
to fully avail themselves of University
food," said Glogower.
Norm Sunstad, associate director of
Universityahousing, said kosher meals
presently are not served in University
housing. In the past, kosher dinners
were served at Markley three times a
week for an extra charge and kosher
T.V. dinners were offered a few years
ago. But the number of people using
this service dwindled and it became
impractical, he said.

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-or Oxford
BECKMAN SAID a questionnaire on
the proposed co-op was sent to Oxford
residents, but only 30 were returned.
The returned surveys showed that the
residents "were generally in favor" of
the idea - except for Noble house
residents.
Noble house residents probably ob-
ject to the kosher co-op, Beckman said,
because more than half of the current
residents would be forced to move out
- only students requiring a kosher diet
could live there - and they didn't
believe the increased specialization is a
good idea.
Noble house residents probably ob-
ject to the kosher co-op, Beckman said,
because more than half of the current
residents would be forced to move out
- only students requiring a kosher diet
could live there - and they didn't
believe the increased specialization is a
good idea.
NOBLE HOUSE resident David
Burgess said that he is against the
kosher co-op on the grounds that arco-op
like Noble for people of varied
backgrounds provides a good at-
mosphere for residents. Even though
the kosher co-op would be open to
anyone followina kosher diet, Burgess
saidit would 'kill the uniqueness of
Noble house."
Burgess also objected to the in-
creased cost of the program to residen-
ts, and added that "to a certain extent,
U of M is going out of its way to provide
an opportunity for a specific religious
group."
Sunstad also said that "the religious
issue needs to be talked through." So
far, the University doesn't specifically
set up housing based on ethnic
background, although some univer-
sities, such as Princeton, do provide it.
MATT BURLEY, also a member of
the Oxford committee, said he favors
the proposal because the University
will not be mingling in religious affairs
since the co-op is open to anyone
following a kosher diet, not only Jewish
students.
Burley added that he thinks it is wor-
th sacrificing lower income housing in
order to accomodate 30 needy students.
Oxford residents' overall view on the
issue will be presented to University
Housing Director Robert Hughes some
time before spring break and housing
will decide on its practicality.
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Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Louisiana truckers quit strike
Louisiana independent truckers, flying black flags of mourning, quit their
strike and returned to the highways yesterday, joining other drivers who
said they must hit the road or go broke.
New Transportation Secretary Elizabeth Dole said the nationwide truck
strike was a failure and offered to meet with "all responsible represen-
tatives of the trucking industry" to discuss the issues.
"There has been no widespread disruption of commerce nationally
and.. . we have seen a marked increase in other modes of transportation,"
she said.
"As the current climate of fear recedes, we will, I am confident, be better
able to address those issues calmly and in an atmosphere of mutual
respect."
There were reports of increased traffic on interstate highways, but more
violence marked the nine-day strike called by the Independent Truckers
Association to protest hikes in fuel taxes and road-use fees.
The U.S. Agriculture Department said the strike had little impact on food
distribution. Rail deliveries were up as much as 50 percent in some cities.
Bendix chief Agee to resign
SOUTHFIELD, Mich. - Bendix Corp. Chairman William Agee - star
player in one of business' most bizarre merger battles - announced yester-
day he will resign his positions as Bendix chief and president of Allied Corp.
by June 1.
f The announcement was made jointly by Bendix and Allied, which is
headquartered in Morristown, N.J. A press release said Agee will, however,
stand for re-election to the Allied board of directors at the annual
shareholders meeting on April 25.
Last autumn, Agee was involved in a wild takeover battle begun when
Bendix tried to acquire controlling interest in Martin-Marietta and ended up
being taken over by Allied.
His statement marks the second departure in two days of a top Bendix
executive. On Monday, Bendix President Alonzo McDonald confirmed he
had resigned because Allied Chairman Edward Hennessy "saw no role" for
him at the merged company.
Dems outline economic plan
WASHINGTON - House Democratic leaders declared yesterday that
time has run out for President Reagan's economic program and indicated
their attempt to dismantle it will include scuttling virtually all the tax cuts
he wants in future years.
But the plan outlined by Rep. Dan Rostenkowski (D-Ill.), chairman of the
tax-writing Ways and Means Committee, would allow this year's 10 percent
cut in individual income taxes to take effect..
At the same time, he and other Democratic leaders pressed for a $5 billion
relief package for the nation's jobless that may include $1 billion worth of
emergency assistance for food and shelter.
"Two years ago, when the 97th Congress met, the question was would the
president get a chance," House Speaker Thomas O'Neill said. "Well, he did
and things did not get better, they got worse."
O'Neill (D-Mass.) added that "stimulating the economy, not cutting
budgets, is the first order of business for the 98th Congress."
In remarks to a computer and communications industry group, O'Neill
noted that Reagan "thinks the economy is on the mend." In fact, said the
speaker, "it is in need of intensive care."
Blanchard defends pessimistic
outlook for state economy
EAST LANSING - Gov. James Blanchard, citing a major increase in
welfare caseloads, defended yesterday his administration's pessimistic
projections on the state's economy and budget.
Blanchrd told the Michigan Association of Broadcasters the state's
general assistance caseload grew by 5,000 cases last month, a major in-
crease. Others, however, noted the figures he apparently used are very
preliminary in nature.
Some have suggested that the recent improvements in car sales and
unemployment call into question the governor's assertion that Michigan's
budget is $900 million in deficit and that a 38 percent income tax hike is
needed to correct the situation.
"I am very, very concerned that there are legislators who want to use
those things as excuses to avoid facing the music," Blanchard said.
Officials slow evacuation after
explosion near Traverse City
KINGSLEY -Officials cancelled a planned evacuation of an entire northern
Michigan village of 700 late yesterday when it was discovered the vapors
spewing from a gas well drilling site probably were not deadly.
Late in the afternoon, the state police, acting ininformation from coutny
and local officials, ordered the residents of Kingsley evacuated from their
homes because it was believed deadly hydrogen-sulfide gas was spewing
from a drilling blowout site.
The evacuations were cancelled when officials were told the vapors were
natural gas.
"Originally the information we received was that it was a sour gas well,"
said dispatcher Don Sudekum at the Traverse City state police post about 10
miles northwest of the blowout site. "But the oil company, Traverse Oil,
advised us that there is no sour gas at that site and there has never been.
"We can't prove what they are saying so we are still taking precautions
but we are only evacuating the 49 people within a half-mile radius of the
site," he said.

Vol. XCIII, No. 107
Wednesday, February 9, 1983

4

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SPRING BREAK, IN FLORIDA

FEB. 18 - 27, 1983
Arrangements by
ECHO TRA VEL, INC.
MC132571F

DA YrONA BEA CH
FOUR PER ROOM
$189
FT. LAUDERDALE
FOUR PER ROOM
$279
FT. LA UVERDALE
WITII(T 1
TRA NSPORT4 TION
$179

TRIP INCL UDES
" Round trip motor coach transportation via modern highway
coaches to Daytona Beach, Florida leaving Sat.. Feb. 19.
" Six nights accommodations at the exciting Plaza Hotel of
Daytona Beach. located at 600 North Atlantic Ave., it is the
most demanded hotel on the strip at that time.,
" Round trip motor coach transportation to Ft. Lauderdale,
Florida leaving Friday. Feb. 18.
" Seven nights accommodations at the fabulous Holiday Inn,
Ft. Lauderdale Beach Sunrise. Located at 999 North Atlantic
Blvd,
" A truly great schedule of activities including our famous
pool deck parties and belly flop contest.
" Optional excursions in Daytona available to Disney World,
Fpcot, and several other attractions,
" Numerous bar and restaurant discounts.
* The services of lull time travel representatives.
" All taxes and gratuities.

4

A QUALITY TRIP -A LOWPRICE-A GREAT TIME
I he la, I I.o'l.t ,Io aIcd right in the middle of the strip, is definitely the place to be during
Hping broik Ask anyone who has been to Daytona. The hotel has a pool, big party deck,
I C'Itai ru t, 10ur1hhos, color I*V, air conditioned rooms and plenty of activities. The Holiday
li "r stum isc isonec t the lincs. first class hotels in Ft. Lauderdale. All rooms are oceanview,
he Color I , and rrgeratirs.Beautiful pool deck area, nightclub, and restaurant make
this a a'catin tio rememher Pictures are available where you sign up, Our motorcoaches are
not hing but Ihe hightst quality highway coaches. We also give you more extras with our trip
than anonc clsc Don't blow it and go on a lower quality trip. LAST YEAR OVER 8,000
PEOPI, EN lE) THIS TRIP.

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