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February 02, 1983 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-02-02

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ARTS

The Michigan Daily

Wednesday, February 2, 1983

Page 5

*1

Ballroom celebri

Three girls from Goo-Goo entertain the crowds at the R.C. Audiorium for the Minority Arts Festival.
inority culturefestival

y Julie Winokur
F OUR DAYS OF art exhibitions,
lectures, and performance events
comprise this weekend's 9th Annual
Minority Arts and Cultural Festival at
East Quad. The festival, sponsored by
the ABENG Minority Council, will run
Feb. 3-6 with free admission to all even-
ts.
Thursday night at 7:00, Vera Em-
ree, chairperson of the Dance Depar-
ent, will conduct opening ceremonies
in Room 126, East Quad. The show's
coordinator, Michael Davis, explains,
"We chose Vera because she's a source
person. She's been here a long time and
has an undying belief in the strength of
people." Entertainment for the even-
ing will feature a jazz concert with
Renevouz in the Residential College
Auto rium.
Friday's events will begin at 4 p.m.
,nth a women's workshop in the
ABENG Lounge and an art exhibit in
Room 124.
Sevrah' s
By Maiya Grath
ECOND IN ITS Celebration of
Jewish Arts series, Hillel hosted
eula Gill in concert at the Michigan
heatre last Saturday night. The inter-
nationally acclaimed Israeli singer
took the stage at 8 p.m. and held the full
house utterly mesmerized for nearly
two hours. With her three-octave vocal
range, Gill poured out her heart in song,
and subsequently won the hearts of her
listeners.
Before the first numbr-a soulful
tune that set the pace for the show to
come-Ms. Gill spoke briefly of her
reer and the background of Israeli
usic itself. Unlike most other coun-
tries, Israel had to build its cultural
traditions and folk music from scratch
in little more than a generation.
Drawing on the inspiration and abilities;
of Jewish people from all over the
world, Israeli music is largely based on
quotations from the prayer book, the
Holy Days, reclamation of the beloved
land, and the never-ending struggle for
freedom and survival.
Gill herself is a "Sevrah," a native
sraelite. The word, as she reminded
the audience, derives from the name of
the cactus populating the desert
climate of Israel: "Prickly and hard on
the outside, yet soft and sweet on the in-
side." Such a definition seems made to
order for Gill the performer. The
strength and beauty of her voice, com-
bined with genuine sincerity and love
all add up to a truly remarkable
elebration of the sadness and joys in
e accomplishments and plight of the
Jewish people.
The concert line-up ranged from up-
beat, jubilant tunes that set the audien-
ce tapping their toes and humming
along, to plaintive, cantorial-style
songs that watered the eyes of more
/V 'r...... ..a

. At 6:00, Jemendari Kamara,
professor in the Center for Afro-
American Studies, will conduct a
political.workshop in Greene Lounge.
Davis says the workshop is aimed at
"other minorities that don't consider
themselves minorities, but have
similiar problems to blacks."
Friday's festivities will conclude at 8
p.m. with a gospel concert in the R.C.
Auditorium.
A workshop on minority fraternities and
land sororities beginning at noon in Room
126 will begin Saturday's activities.
Next, at 3 p.m. in the Benzinger Library
there will be readings of student,
faculty, and professional poetry.
The festival's premiere attraction,
the Fashion/Performing Arts Show will
begin Saturday night at 8 p.m. in the
R.C. Auditorium and be followed by a
benefit dance in the South Cafeteria.
The show will feature various student
performers as well as a troupe of
professional Phillippino dancers and a
Native American dance group. The

girls of Goo-Goo will return for a second
year to do impersonations. Closing
ceremonies, beginning at 7 p.m. Sunday
in the R.C. Auditorium, will be hosted
by Dr. Julian Earls, Executive Chief of
Aeronomics at NASA.
Davis explains that "the purpose of
the festival is to expose people to other
cultures and traditional ways." He
emphasizes that "the show is not solely
for minorities. We hope this year to get
more non-minorities to participate in
the activities offered."
ABENG coordinator Rayl Stepter
sees the cultural arts festival as crucial
to the minority community because
"with University financial cuts and
dropping student enrollment,
especially among blacks, the festival is
more important now than ever before."
The Monority Arts and Cultural
Festival is perhaps the most prominent
landmark of Black History Month and
the doors are open for all to learn and
participate.
weet voice
Music" and "Fiddler on the Roof."
A truly beautiful performer, Gill
brought feeling and meaning to all'the
songs in her repertoire, which includes
songs in ten languages. The incredible
strength and quality of her voice, along
with her physical vivacity, made her
performance an absolute joy to witness.
Although few of the lyrics were in
English, there was virtually no
language barrier. The full essence and
spirit of the music became crystal clear,
through her fantastic talent.
Above all, Gill stressed the hope and
aspiration of the Jewish people.
Through her music it was strikingly
apparent, even to those non-Jews in the
audience, that here, as nowhere else, is
a people and a culture so full of pride
and exhaltation that no obstacle is too
great to overcome, no burden too heavy
to carry.

By Tom McDonald
O VER 500 PEOPLE celebrated in
Michigan Union Ballroom Satur-
day night for the most valued of all
possessions-life. -A Celebration of
Life, a benefit show for nuclear
disarmament, lived up to all expec-
tations as a standing-room-only crowd
of spirited patrons were treated to an
evening of superb entertainment.
Opening the first part of the show,
which featured activities and perfor-
mances pertinent to the nuclear issue,
was Vera Embree, a University
Professor of Dance who engaged in a
unique African solo dance in two parts
entitled "Negation of the War Gods,"
and "Celebration." Dressed in a floor
length African robe, Embree gracefully
glided to the rhythm of conga drums
with amazing fluidity. Her original
piece exhibited meticulous style and
splendour, showing the dedication she
has in refining her dancing ability.
Also dancing was Artworlds instruc-
tor Whitley Setrakian. Setrakian's
poignant routine on a parent's concern
for the future of their baby in a nuclear
age elicited an emotional reaction from
viewers who were moved by her sen-
sitive dance with her young child in her
arms. Dancing to the music of a spacey
Brian Eno composition, the artist
sought to awaken a myopic society to
the possibilities of a nuclear age.
The University Mime Troupe
followed with a notable showing by per-
forming a captivating routine called
"Evolution" which probed the per-
nicious volatility of man's progression
into more sophisticated levels of
existence. The routine outlined the
significant developments of man'
originating from the apes and
culminating into our present status,
bent on destruction. The performers
simulated pressing the button for the
explosion of the nuclear bomb, and af-
ter detonation, acted out the pain and
suffering of humanity that would be the
immediate result.
After a magical transformation, the
mimes began a retrogradation back to
their creation as apes, an action which
suggested the possibility for preventing
the ultimate disaster if action is quickly
initiated. With the aid of various sound
Prine to play
John Prine is at his prime, thank
goodness. That means the well-known
folk singer is touring again, with Ann
Arbor being one of his first stops. The
author of such fine albums as Bruised
Orange, Prine will be performing at the
Michigan Theatre at 8 p.m. on March
4th.
Reserved tickets go on sale this
Friday, February 4th at the Michigan
Theatre box office. Seats are $8.50 and
$9.50. For further information call 668-
8480.
Subscribe to The
Michigan Daily
764-0558

and lighting effects, the well-rehearsed
troupe attempted to capture the essen-
ce of man's insensitivity to himself and
to his existence, and in so doing, showed
that man's destiny can only be con-
trolled by himself.
The final dance was executed by
Jessie Richards and the Afro-Jazz Jedi
dancers who performed a dance to
celebrate personal power. The zealous
quartet proceeded through the routine
in a colorful and dynamic fashion,
seeking to personify the maximization
of individual power in order to control
the future. The lively dance displayed
fine technique and original
choreography.
Comprising the second part of the
show was Ann Arbor's duke of the har-
monica, Peter "Madcat" Ruth, whose
appearance was surely the highlight of
the event. Madcat's presence always
creates an aura of excitement over
listeners when he commences to play.
In his opening number, "I'll Be Long
Gone Like the Turkey and the Corn,"
Madcat displayed the talents that have
gained him recognition as one of the
premiere harmonica players in the
nation. Reaching into his bag of tricks,
he produced sounds from his assorted
hardware that one never thought
existed. He must have had over ten dif-
ferent wind instruments in and out of,
his mouth during just one song.
Another crowd pleaser was the folk
classic, "Mamma's Little Baby Loves
Short'ning Bread," which Ruth tran-
sformed into a classic of his own. No
slouch in the guitar or vocal depar-
tments either, Madcat also played the
popular sing-a-long, "He's Got The
Whole World in His Hands," with the
help of the audience who were more
than happy to test their vocal faculties.
While Ruth's songs aren't particularly
politically flavored, he does have

7tes life
strong views about the nuclear issue.
"This whole thing isn't politics, it's life
and death. We have to increase the con-
sciousness of the world-it's due to
change," he commented after the show.
Also performing in this segment was
the local group Trees, a female duet
who put on an impressive set of original
songs. I first questioned the com-
bination of conga drums and acoustic
guitar as the sole instruments for every
song, but my doubts were assuaged as
the blend worked out suprisingly well.
The guitar proficiency of the young
woman was equally meritable. Trees
delighted the crowd with their rich
harmonies and instrumental dexterity.
The distinct melodies and catchy riffs
were also notable strengths. Trees is
definitely worthy of further listening at
Flood's, where they appear on Sundays. "'
Rounding out the music portion was
local singer-songwriter, Ann Doyle,
who was joined by Randy Pettit and
Stephanie Ozer. While her guitar
playing appeared to lack depth, Doyle's
vocal capacities were the obvious
highlights of her act. Sounding similiar
to Joni Mitchell at times, Doyle played
an entertaining package of original
tunes which the audience responded to
very well. As a fitting conclusion to the
event, there was dance music by
drummers Aron Kaufman and friends,
and also by the female rock band
Herizon.
Those in attendance at the
celebration had a great time. "Con-
tributing to an important cause and
seeing this great entertainment was:
well worth my five bucks," said one'
patron after the show. Jesse Richards,
the organizer of the highly successful
event, stated, "It turned out better than
I ever expected." Funds for the event
were distributed to three area peace
organizations.

r

0

. " -- - -

ngs witn si
than one enraptured listener. One such
tear-jerker told of the first liberation of
the West Wall during the Six Day War.
It rang sad and true of the desolation of
a soldier, a young girl, and a mother,
mourning the loss of loved ones.
Towards the end of the program Gill
did her rendition of "Leujehi," a haun-
tingly beautiful song asking, "Lord,
why has thou forsaken me?" Even
Geula's eyes brimmed with tears and
her lovely voice cracked when she ex-
plained that a woman once rose to sing
this song the moment before her cruel
execution and was shot to death while
doing so.
On a more cheerful note, Gill ex-
plained that the American musical has
caught on with increasing popularity in
Israel. She demonstrated by per-
froming excerpts from several well-
known shows, including "The Sound of

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"IF NOT NOW, THEN W HEN?
IF NOT ME, THEN WHO?"
HIGHLIGHTING-MUSIC
First Week-AFRICAN and CARIBBEAN
Second Week-GOSPEL and BLUES
Third Week-JAZZ and SOUL

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COMING EVENTS
*MARCH 5-Alice Lloyd Presents
"Bronze Elegance"-fashion show,
Michigan Union Ballroom, Admission:
$10.00-couple, $5.00-single
*MARCH 19-"Rhapsody in Black,"
Markley Hall-Banquet
KICKOFF BLACK HISTORY MONTH-PREVIEW
Refreshments and Entertainment,
Mosher-Jordan Hall, 7:30 p.m. (free)
1983 - "IF NOT NOW, THEN WHEN?
IF NOT ME, THEN WHO?"
Speaker: Dr. Ronald Quincy, Director
of Michigan Civil Rights Department.
Trotter House, 1443 Washtenow, 7:30p.m.
"THE HARDER THEY COME"
Movie starring Jimmy Cliff,
West Quad-Wedge Room, 7:00 p.m.
9th ANNUAL MINORITY ARTS & CULTURAL
FESTIVAL-EAST QUAD
Thursday 2/3-Sunday 2/6
Opening Ceremonies, Room 126
Jazz Concert, R.C. Auditorium, 8:30 p.m.

2/6

JAZZ WORKSHOP
Featuring: Anthony Braxton, Trotter
House, 1443 Washtenaw, 4:00 p.m.
9th ANNUAL MINORITY ARTS & CULTURAL
FESTIVAL - EAST QUAD
Poetry Readings, Benzinger Library
1:00-3:00 p.m.
Closing Ceremonies-Speaker: Dr.
Julian Earls, National Aeronautics
& Space Administration, R.C. Audi-
torium, 7:00 p.m.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN GOSPEL CHOIR
Stockwell Hall-Blue Carpet Lounge, 7:30
p.m.
"LADY SINGS THE BLUES"
Movie starring Diana Ross & Billy
Dee Williams, Couzens Hall-Cameo
Lounge, 10:00 p.m.

2/11
2/12

"LADY SINGS THE BLUES"
Movie starring Diana Ross & Billy
Dee Williams, East Quad-Room 126,
8:00 p.m.
DANCE-FUND RAISER FOR UNITED
NEGRO COLLEGE FUND
Vera Baits Hall-Eaton Lounge,
10:00 p.m.
*"BURSLEY SHOW"
Fund raiser for Minority Pre-
orientation (Fresh men eekend)
Bursley Hall-Cafeteria, 8:00 p.m.
"TAKE A LOOK AT YOUR FUTURE"
East Quad-Abeng Lounge, 2:00 p.m.
"SOUL & SPIRIT GOSPEL CONCERT"
Featuring: The Voices of Bethel,
Trotter House, 4:00 p.m.
"PLANT CLOSINGS-POLITICAL
STRATEGIES"
Speaker: Jemadari Kamara, Lecturer CAAS,
West Quad-Minority Lounge, 4:00-6:00 p.m.

2/17

2/1
2/2
2/3

2/13

*SOUL FOOD DINNER
Alice Lloyd Cafeteria, 4:30-6:15 p.m.
R.S.V.P. & "BLACK LEADERSHIP
PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE," Speaker:
Dr. Anthony Ingram, Affirmative Action
Office, Alice Lloyd-Minority Lounge, 7:00
p.m.
"THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MISS JANE
PITTMAN"
Movie starring Cicely Tyson
Trotter House, 8:00 p.m.
"SCOTT JOPLIN"
Movie starring Billy Dee Williams,
Mosher-Jordan-Nikki Giovanni
Lounge, 8:00 p.m.
SPRING RECESS BEGINS
*DENOTES ADMISSION CHARGE
PROGRAMS SPONSORED BY: Housing-
Special Programs, Trotter House,
Ethics & Religion, and Minority
Organizations in each hall.
Events listed represent programs
sponsored by Housing-Special Pro-
grams, a unit of Student Services.
Other Black History events planned

2/9
2/10

2/19

*SOUL FOOD DINNER
Mosher-Jordan Cafeteria, 4:30-6:30
p.m.-R.S.V.P.
*SOUL FOOD DINNER
South Quad Cafeteria, 4:45-6:30 p.m,
R.S.V.P.
"IF NOT NOW, THEN WHEN? IF NOT ME,
TUrl Ar.*flfl-%0

AFRICAN DANCERS
South Quad-West Lounge, 7:30 p.m.
"HEALTH CAREERS & THE BLACK STUDENT"
Speaker: Valener Perry, Admissions
Counselor-Pharmacy, Couzens Hall-

2/4

9th ANNUAL MINORITY ARTS & CULTURAL
FESTIVAL-EAST QUAD

2/14

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