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February 01, 1983 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-02-01

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I

Page 6-Tuesday, February 1, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Bush pushes NATO weapons plan

From AP and UPI
BERLIN - Vice President George
Bush flew to West Berlin yesterday and
called the divided city a symbol of the
NATO alliance as an estimated 5,000
people demonstrated against U.S.
policy in Latin America.
"No other city. . . has so bravely
stood against forces of oppression,"
said Bush on arrival at Berlin's Tegel
airport on the second day of a 13-day, 7-
nation tour of western Europe to drum
up support for the NATO disarmament
strategy.
Bush said earlier yesterday after
morning talks with West German
leaders in Bonn that he and Chancellor

Helmut Kohl had reaffirmed they were
determined to try to eliminate the
whole class of middle-range rockets.
Bush said he and Kohl had agreed the
NATO "zero option" proposal was still
the way forward at the current Geneva
arms talks.
Under this proposal, the Soviet Union
would dismantle its entire force of
nuclear-armed SS-20 missiles,
estimated to total about 330, in return
for the cancellation of U.S. plans to
deploy 572 medium range Pershing 2
and cruise missiles in Western Europe.
MEANWHILE, Secretary of State
George Shultz is in Japan telling
government leaders the United States

will not make an arms control deal in
Europe that results in more medium-
range Soviet SS-20 missiles aimed at
targets in Asia.
Last week the Japanese government
objected to a statement by Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko that
if a missile reduction agreement is
reached at Geneva, Moscow would con-
sider shifting some of its European-
based SS-20s to the Far East.
John Hughes, chief spokesman for
the State Department, said Shultz was
reiterating "our position of strength
and constancy at the arms control talks
in Geneva."

Buddy Rich stable
after heart surgery

By TOMAS MILLER
Famed jazz drummer Buddy Rich
was listed in stable condition yesterday
afternoon following heart surgery
Friday at University Hospital.
Hospital officials said they were
confident Rich would make a complete
recovery after suffering a heart attack
Friday morning, and that he sustained
little permanent damage from the
quadruple bypass surgery.
RICH'S ATTACK came only hours
before he was scheduled to perform
a concert at Hill Auditorium sponsored
by Eclipse Jazz.
The concert went on as planned with
replacement drummer Danny D'Im-

perio, who was flown in from New York4
for the show. Eclipse Jazz spokesman
Peter Pretsfelder said Rich and the
other and members decided early
Friday to hire a replacement and go
ahead with the show.
Pretsfelder said concert attendance
was not drastically reduced because of
Rich's absence. He also said that the
Michigan Union Box Office was of-
fering refunds, but only one or two had
been given out by yeserday afternoon.
Hospital spokesman Joe Owsley said
Rich could be moved from the intensive
care unit today or tomorrow, and
should be able to leave the hospital by
this weekend.

Bush
... delicate mission

'U' South African investments: Save or divest?

(Continued from Page 1)
CRITICS OF the policy say it has
done little or nothing to improve the lot
of black workers in South Africa, a
country which still practices apartheid.
"It's a shield to protect companies in-
terested in South Africa," said State
Rep. Perry Bullard (D-Ann Arbor),

who sponsored the bill requiring the,
state's universities to divest.
Graduate student Benjamin Davis, a
member of the committee, said "the
evidence is just clear and over-
whelming that the Sullivan Principles
have not contributed to reforming the
lives of black South Africans.'
WHILE GIES described divestment
as an ineffective "one-time shock" to
racist South Africa, he said it would
definitely be a serious blow to the
economy of Michigan.

He said it would hamper efforts to at-
tract new industry to Michigan and
worsen the problem of companies
leaving to find better economic
climates.
Norman Herbert, the University's
chief investment officer, said with
companies like General Motors Cor-
poration, Ford Motor Company, and
General Electric in the affected por-
tfolio, divestment would hurt com-
panies "that are very critical to the
economy of Michigan.'

*h'kCALCUI

LA' ITOR S

z

V a rt 'i.llrV M dK-la y VOJ

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
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581,59 Libraries ..25 TI-A55 (New) ...43
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PC-1211 POCKET COMPUTER
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PC-1250 Handheld Computer (New).
CE-125 Printer/ cassette (New).

WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE
BETWEEN LOVE & HERPES?
HERPES IS FOREVER"
on Silkscreen white T-shirt
with red heart SOO% cotton/

--._.

DAVIS TERMED this argument
'crocodile tears."
"What are Ford and GM and Dow
doing? They're exporting jobs. They
hire workers in South Africa for a tenth
of what they pay in Michigan," he said.
Graudate student Ian Telford,
another member of the committee, said
he once supported divestment, but now
has reservations about selling that
much stock. "If we did accept (the new
state law), where would we stop.. . just
about everyone has an interest in South
Africa, the list is unbelievable."
FOR THE University, that list
amounts to $42.6 million of common
stock in 34 corporations, according to
Herbert.
Divestment ,supporters say it would
not be a financial disaster to divest,
pointing to Michigan State University,
which divested in 1978. That action ac-
tually saved Michigan State an
estimated $1 million, as the value of
those "blue-chip" stocks fell soon after
the sale.
Herbert cautioned that MSU's ex-
perience was a unique one, and the
result came "after the fact."
CURRENTLY the Financial Affairs
Committee's proposal is only scheduled
as an information item for the Feb. 14
meeting, but a petition urging divest-
ment has been circulating among the
faculty, and Ron Bishop, head of the
faculty senate, said, "I sense that there
will be some action."

Congress shivers at
Reagan budget freeze"
(Continued from Page 1) Reagan of proposing "heavier burdens
on the unemploved_ the elderi the

4

160
165
105
125
175
65,
45
80
130

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Medicare, Medicaid, welfare and food
stamps, and urged passage of a
package of Social Security changes
esimted to save $12.2 billion.
In his budget message to Congress,
Reagan said, "I am recommending a
federal spending freeze. I know this is
strong medicine. . . this plan is urgen-
tly needed and is geared toward solving
the problems of the growing deficits."
The budget estimates the deficit will
hit a staggering $207.7 billion this year
and $188.7 in fiscal 1984, which begins
Oct. 1, even if all the spending cuts and
tax changes are enacted. The deficit
was a record $110.7 billion in 1982.
Reagan's budget prescription was
generally well known in advance, and
there were predictions in Congress of
tough battles over defense, social
programs and taxes.
Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.) accused

---,..-..k-.'yJ '*I C , C.**' rifler y, LAIe
poor, the sick, the blue-collar worker
and the middle-income family" while
increasing defense spending.
Poli1ce
inotes.
Hitchhiker sexually
assaulted
A 30-year-old woman was sexually
assaulted on Ann Arbor's southeast
side Friday night, Ann Arbor police
said. The woman was hitchhiking from
Ypsilanti when she was picked up by a
man in his 40s. He drove the woman to
the Quick-Pick on the corner of Shadow
and Ellsworth, where he made verbal
advances and grabbed the woman
several times before she was able to get
away. The suspect has not been ap-
prehended.
Armed juveniles
rob house
Three juveniles brandishing a knife
forced their way into a home on the 1100
block of Spring Street Saturday night
and threatened three children who were
in the house at the time. The suspects
searched the house but took only some
change found in a bedroom. Police said
the children knew the robbers. Ann Ar-
bor police spokesman said all the
juveniles were Ann Arbor residents.

l E IS~AL

I

Address
aNn (,uuranee Pla al u ln 4-6 s /fr delivery m'
Ce gtr
Classifieds get results!

- -- - ---- - -'-..S.. *ft.A tjJ
IT WILL NOT BE REPEATED
Aes dscou d Mastercard or Viso by mai or phone Mal Cashiers
Ce k nyOrPrs. Check2wks to r). Sorry no COs. Add $400 1st
it.AKR.NI, PR., Crniadd $8.00 first item) $1.00 eo. odd'I shspg. hondi. Shpts. to
Iadrsad 16so. rces subj. to chorge. WRITE (no tils) for IH oatwg.ALL ELEK-
1111 MDSE.IS BRAND NEW 1ST DUAL AND COMPLETE.

Riverside Research Institute is a not-for-profit
scientific research organization. Openings for entry
level technical personnel exist in our N.Y.C. Cor-
porate Headquarters.
We will be on campus February 17, 1983 and look
forward to interviewing candidates with the follow-
ing disciplines and degrees:
E.E. B.S. M.S. PhD
Optics B.S. M.S. PhD
Systems Eng. B.S. M.S. PhD
Physics PhD
We offer competitive salaries and a liberal benefits
package including full tuition reimbursement.
Please contact your placement office to arrange an
appointment to meet with us on the 17th.
RIVERSIDE RESEARCH INSTITUTE
330 West 42nd Street / New York, New York 10036

Still Available!

Apartment robbed of
jewelry

4

The SaD1RC T 1982
982-81982-83
1982M i">S
STUDENT
DIRECTORY?
ON
SALE
NOWd .

Jewelry valued at $874 was stolen
'from an apartment on the 400 block of
South Division. Ann Arbor police said
the robbers forced open the front door
between 7:00 and noon Sunday morning
and stole the jewelry. No suspects have
been found.
- Halle Czechowski

HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF APPLICATION FORMS
FOR 1983-84 ACADEMIC YEAR
Available Starting January 24, 1983 for Reapplying Staff
Available Starting February 4, 1983 for New Applicants
In Housing Office, 1500 SA.B.
POSITIONS INCLUDE: Resident Director, Assistant Resident
Director, Resident Advisor, Head
Librarian, Resident Fellow, Minority
Peer Advisors and Graduate Student
Teaching Assistant
Advisory positions require the completion of a minimum of 48 undergraduate credit hours
toward program by the end of the' Spring Term 1983 for the Resident Fellows in Residential
College, Resident Advisor and Minority Peer Advisor positions: Graduate status for Graduate
Student Teaching Assistant in Pilot Program, Head Librarian, and Resident Director positions.
However, qualified undergraduate applicants may be considered for the Resident Director
positions.
QUALIFICATIONS: (1) Must be a registered U of M student on the Ann Arbor
Campus during the period of employment. (2) Must have completed a minimum
of four terms or equivalent and 48 undergraduate credit hours toward program
by the end of the Spring Term 1983. (3) Undergraduate applicants must have at
least a 2.50 cumulative grade point average in the school or college in which
they are enrolled by the end of the Spring Term 1983. Graduate applicants
must be in good academic standing in the school or college in which they are
enrolled by the end of the Spring Term 1983. (4) Proof of these eligibility
rnuirements will h rAuirAd. (5) Preferenc mn b niven to annlicnnts who

AT THESE CAMPUS BOOKSTORES:

IA

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