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February 01, 1983 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-02-01

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, February 1, 1983-Page 3

University offers study

By BILL HANSON
With the end of another school year
just around the corner, the thought of
taking summer classes is, for most
students, a dreadful one.
But what if the classes were being of-
fered in one of the major cities of
Europe?
IF THAT idea intrigues you, the
University's Center for Western
European Studies' summer abroad
programs could provide the kind of
summer that, until now, you've only
dreamed about.
The Center's two major summer
programs, which are co-sponsored by
the University and Sarah Lawrence
'College, are in London, England and
Florence, Italy.
The center also offers two new
programs, begun last year, in Paris,
France and Israel.
THE LONDON Program, which
begins July 2 and runs through Aug. 11,
offers a total of eight classes in
humanities and social sciences. Studen-
ts choose two classes for a total of six
credits.
Prof. Enoch Brater, program direc-
tor, said that besides the "nice mix" of
classes offered, another advantage of
the program is the fact that there are
very few American instructors, so

students get to study under some of the
"leading British scholars."
Students are housed in converted
townhouses in the Kensington-Knight-
sbridge area of London and are within
walking distance of Hyde Park, the
world famous Harrods Department
store, and several good museums.
THE COST of the program is $1,500 -
the same fee charged for last year's
program - and includes tuition, room
and breakfast, two weekend excur-
sions, and play tickets at the National
Theatre and the new Barbicon Centre.
Brater defended the cost of the
program saying that when one con-
siders all that is included, the fee is
very reasonable.
"I think it's pretty amazing that we
could keep the cost to what it was last
year," Brater said.
BRATER, WHO IS also the graduate
chairman of the English department,
said the London Program is a "wonder-
ful opportunity for students," and one
of the things he's "most proud of at
Michigan.'
The summer session in Florence,
which begins June 26 and ends Aug. 6,
offers nine classes which emphasize
Renaissance studies and encourage
students to make active use of the city
of Florence. Students take two courses

for a total of six credit hours.
The program costs $1,900 and in-
cludes room and board, tuition, and
weekend excursions to Padua and
Venice.
HANK PEITER, associate director of
the Center, said the program provides a
great opportunity for art history buffs.
"People who are interested in the art
of Renaissance Florence will be able to
study the art there in the flesh - rather
than on slides," he said.
Peiter added that it is, "probably the
best summer program in Italy."
THE SPRING session in Paris offers
both classes and internships for studen-
ts in economics, French, and political
science. Interested students must be
proficient in French for classwork and
fluent in French for the internships.
The summer session in Israel, which
is offered in conjunction with Emory
College, involves intensive Hebrew
study at all levels.
Students are also introduced to
working and living on a kibbutz, Peiter
said.
EACH PROGRAM is open to un-
dergraduate and some graduate
students in good academic standing
from all North American colleges and
universities.
Some financial aid is available
through the University for those

abroad
students who qualify.
BOTH BRATER and Peiter advised
early application, as each program has a
limited number of participants.
Students interested in any of the
programs should attend the scheduled
meeting for that program. They are:
Summer session in Florence, Tues.,
Feb. 1, 7 p.m.; Spring session in Paris,
Wed., Feb. 2, 7 p.m.; Summer session
in London, Thur., Feb. 3, 7 p.m.; All
meetings will be held in 13 Angell Hall.
Applications and information will be
distributed.
Information on the summer program
in Israel, and the new academic year
program in Florence, jointly sponsored
with the University of Wisconsin, can
be obtained from Peiter, at 5208 Angell
Hall.
U UM

Sizing it up

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tries on his new clothes as a Car-
the position of Cardinal by Pope

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Archbishop Joseph Bernardin of Chicago1
dinal Bernardin will soon be elevated to
John Paul II.

- PP
-H APPENINGS-
Highlight
Members of the University Symphony with featured soloists Fernando
Garcia-Torres and Rico Saccani on the piano will perform a Brahms
Sesquicentennial Concert at Hill Auditorium at 8 p.m. tonight.
Films
Ann Arbor Film Co-op - The Devil and Daniel Webster, 7p.m., Nat. Sci.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Abraham Lincoln, 8:45 p.m., Nat. Sci.
Campus Crusade for Christ - College Life, 10 p.m., Wedge Room, West
Quad.
Performances
Union Arts Program - Jill Felber and Robert Conway, 8 p.m., Pendleton
Room.
Music School - Thomas Reed, Saxophone Recital, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Music School - Kathryn Thomas, Flute Recital, 8 p.m., Rackham Assem-
bly Hall.
Speakers
Union Arts Program - Dr. Sonia Harlon, "Armenian Odyssey," noon,
Pendleton Room.
College of Engineering - Paul Carson, "Nuclear Magnetic Resonance -
Leading the Revolution in Radiological Imaging," and Bill Colburn, "The
Use of Holograms as Optical Elements," 7:30-10 p.m., Carroll Auditorium.
Center for Human Growth and Development - A. Roberto Frisancho,
"Adolescent Pregnancy and Prenatal Growth," noon, 300 North Ingalls
Building, Dinind Room 3.
Trotter House - Dr. Donald Quincy, "If Not Civil Rights Now, Then
When?", 7:30 p.m., Trotter House.
Department of Chemistry - Dr. Colin Poole, "High Performance Thin
Layer Chromatography: An Acceptable Alternative to HPLC" 4 p.m., 1300
Chemistry.
American Meteorologist Society - Panel discussion, "Why So Warm?"
7:30 p.m., 2132 Space Research Bldg.
Computing Center - Forrest Hartman, "Introduction to Sigfiles", 3:30-5
p.m., 176 BSAD.
Computing Center - Dave Whipple, "Integrated Graphics, I," 3:30 - 5
p.m., 165 BSAD.,
Ecumenical Campus Center - Bamidele Agbasegbe Demerson,
"Reproductive Technology and the Surrogate Mother: A Cross-Cultural
Perspective," noon, International Center.
Urban Planning - Jerold Lax, "Land Use Controls in Cities," 11 a.m., 1040
Dana.
Bioengineering - Frank Filisko, "Blood-materials Interface," 4 p.m.,
1042 E. Engine.
Geological Sciences - W. J. Meyers, "Geochemistry of Regionally Exten-
sive Calcite Cement Zones - Mississippian of New Mexico," 4 p.m., 4001 CC
Little.
Museum of Art - Art Break, "Line of Beauty," and "The Nude," 12:10
p.m.
Meetings
His House Christian Fellowship - Fellowship and Bible Study, 7:30 p.m.,
925 E. Ann.
Ann Arbor Go Club -7p.m., 1433 Mason.
Society of Engineers - Brown Bag, noon, 315 W. Engin.
Baptist Student Union - 7 p.m., 2439 Mason.
Center for Western European Studies - Foreign Study Orientation Mtg.,
"Summer Program in Florence Italy," 7p.m., 13 Angell Hall.
Miscellaneous
UAW Local 898 - Free Classes for Ham Radio License, starts tonight, 7
p.m., Union Hall on Textile Rd., Ypsilanti.
Synergy - New Classes and workshops start tonight, 410 W. Washington.
Student Wood and Crafts Shop - Introduction to Woodworking, 7 p.m., 537
SAB.
Folk Dance Classes - Beginning International, 7-8:15 p.m., Intermediate,
8:15-9:30, 3rd. floor studio, corner of E. Williams and State.
The SOS Community Crisis Center - Interviews for prospective volunteer
crisis counselors, 114 North Fourth River Street, Ypsilanti.
UAC - UAC Mini-Courses - Sign Up, Union Ticket Office.
WCBN - "Third World People's Issues - Minorities At the 'U',", Inter-
view and discussion, 6 p.m.
Racquetball - Practice, Courts 10 and 11, 8 p.m.
Society of Women Engineers - Pre-interview with General Dynamics, 5
p.m., 144 W. Engin.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

Prosecutor to appeal
rape charge dismissal

ANNOUNCING SPEEDY'S
NEW COPY CENTER

By JERRY ALIOTTA
Prosecutors in East Lansing yester-
day said they will appeal the dismissal
of charges against seven men who
allegedly raped a Michigan State
University stuldent last November.
Chief Ingham County Appellant At-
torney Janis Blough said the
preliminary examination of the seven
men, six of whom are MSU students,
was conducted in an "unorthodox man-
ner."
BLOUGH SAID that District Judge
Danile Tschirhart, who dismissed the
rape charges, permitted the press to sit
in the jury box during the examination.
In addition, he said, the friends and
relatives of the defendents who packed
the courtroom continuously interfered
with the proceedings.
"When their outbursts reach a point
where the judge has to say, 'let's cool
it,' that kind of influence can disrupt the
outcome of the proceedings," Blough
said. "Certainly the case was not run in
an ordinary way.''
The seven were arrested last Novem-
ber after they allegedly raped an MSU
student at a dormitory party. The
woman, who has requested anonymity,
said she was invited to the party but
tried to leave when she discovered she
was the only woman present. The men
then removed her clothes and raped her
one at a time, she said.
CHARGES against the seven were
dropped in December, but the six MSU
THE
DESTRUCTION
OF THE
STUDENT
COMMUNITY
/N ANN ARBOR
By Robert D. Honigman
At BORDER'S
ULRICH'S
'U' CELLAR

students were disciplined by the
university, according to MSU vice
president for Student Affairs Moses
f Turner.
Turner refused to specify the nature
of MSU's action. "It's a disciplinary
action that we don't discuss with the
public," he said.
BLOUGH SAID she thought that a
jury might react differently than the
judge did to the expert testimony the
prosecution used n the December
hearing. A clinical psychologist and
expert in rape counseling testified at
the hearing to support the victim's
credibility.

2% blocks from
Michigan Union g

t0

812 South State
(next to Pizza Bobs)
(313) 761-5085

A'South State

SPEEDY RESERVE NOTE
IOFF
COPY ORDER ONLY
For Speedy Copies... ... and Kodak Quality
Expres February 28.,1983 ti Not Redeemable For Cash
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