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January 30, 1983 - Image 8

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-01-30

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4

SPORTS

The Michigan Daily

Sunday, January 30, 1983

Page 8

Illini outlast Blue,

(Continued from Page 1)
good acting job."
The first half was much like the first
10 minutes of the second stanza, as
neither team could take a commanding
lead and the Wolverines went into the
lockerroom ahead, 38-36.
A scary moment for Michigan came
with a minute left in the opening period
when Harper fouled Turner catching
the Wolverine star in the face. Turner
lay on the ground for a couple of
minutes in obvious pain. With
Rockymore likely to be out for the
Big Ten Standings
Conference Overall
W L W L
Indiana 5 2 15 2
Minnesota 5 2 13 3
Purdue 4 3 13 4
Ohio State 4 3 12 5
Iowa 4 3 13 4
Illinois 4 3 14 6
Northwestern 3 4 12 5
Michigan St. 3 5 10 8
Wisconsin 2 5 7 9
MICHIGAN 2 6 11 7

season, a serious injury to Turner
would have been devastating. Turner
sat out the last minute, but returned to
play the entire second half.
THE LOSS was especially disappoin-
ting for Michigan because it was the
second home loss in a row for the
Wolverines, and some fine individual
performances were wasted.
Tim McCormick turned in a career-
high 23 points and Pelekoudas finished
with a season-high 11 before fouling out
with one minute left. Turner, who hit
a season-high four three-pointers, also
dished out six assists in 39 minutes of
playing time.
However, the outstanding play of
Illini guards Harper and freshman
Bruce Douglas proved too much for
Michigan to handle. Harper, who
finished with a career-high 29 points,

was 10 of 15 from the field and a hot
nine-of-10 from the line, including eight
in a row at the end of the game.
Douglas, who finished with 16 points
and seven assists, led Illinois in the
closing moments.
"DOUGLAS DID the job for us down
the stretch," said Illinois coach Lou
Henson. "He engineered the victory for
us."
"The kids felt the effects of Thur-
sday's game and our lack of depth at

17=74
guard hurt us," said Frieder. "We
didn't make the big plays and they did.
They're a good team. Today's game
and Thursday's are the kind you have to
win. We're going to keep working and
hang tough."
The win boosted Illinois' Big Ten
mark to 4-3 while Michigan fell to 2-6 in
conference play. The Wolverines have
now lost four in a row and have the
week off before facing Michigan State
next Saturday at Crisler.

Pooped out
ILLINOIS
Pts. MinFG/FGAF'F/FFA Reb

MICHIGAN

Winters ..............
Welch ................
Leonard ..............
Harper ...............
Douglas............
Montgomery........
Meents...............
Altenberger ..........
Woodward............
Kusendorf..........
Bontemps..........

13
13
2
29
16
6
4
0
2
0

36
35
16
38
40
25
5
7
1'
1

5/10
6/8
1/2
10/15
6/9
3/6
2/3
0/2
1/1
0/0

3/4
1/4
0/0
9/10
4/4
0/0
0/0
0/0
0/0
0/0

6
1
5
3
3
6
0
0
0
0

s.MinFG/FGAFT/FTAReb
35 2/6 2/5 3

Henderson...........6

Rellford.............
McCormick.........
Turner.............
Pelekoudas..........
Wade..............
Jokisch............
Tarpley.............
Rudy ..................

6 21
23 34
25 39
11 37
3 22
0 8
0 2q
0 2.

3/7
8/9
10/19
4/8
1/4
0/0
0/0
0/0

0/0
7/8
1/2
2/2
1/2
0/0
0/0
0/0

5
3
2
3
2
1
0

SCORES
College Basketball
Iowa 63. Indiana 48
Minnesota 63, Wisconsin 58
Northwestern 66, Ohio State 64
Michigan State 83. Purdue 67
Virginia 98, Louisville 81
North Carolina 72, Georgia Tech 65

2 1

0/0 0/0 1

Totals ..................... 200 34/56 19/24 27 Totals ..................... 200 28/53 13/19 22

3Jireebian $'11p0
By LARR YFREED

Losing and learning .

0 .

. .. no Rock-less Horror Show

MICHIGAN BASKETBALL entered a new era
yesterday. In the first game A.R. (after
Rockymore) the Wolverines proved that the
sophomore guard's season-ending injury could
have beneficial long-range effects.
A new confidence crept into the team, and
despite the 87-74 loss to Illinois there were some
bright spots to note - most notably the play of
Dan Pelekoudas.
The junior guard, who has been forced into full-
time duty, responded by playing with poise as he
collected a season-high 11 points, dished out six
assists and had four steals.
"With the injury to Rock we all got to pick up the
slack," said the 6-2 co-captain. "We have to just
play our game and all look a little bit extra for the
outside shot."
Perhaps that is the turnaround the team will
make during Leslie Rockymore's absence. Out-
side of the Detroit sharpshooter and Eric Turner,
the rest of the Wolverines were a little gun shy
earlier this season.
But Pelekoudas exemplified the attitude Bill
Frieder's squad has assumed. The usually timid
shooter change# his tune against the Illini. He
converted on four-of-eight from the field including

one three-point play. Even Turner started to fire
from behind the bonus stripe as he converted on
his first four long-range bombs, mostly on pull-ups
off the fast break.
Turner and Pelekoudas, however, were not the
only ones compensating for their fallen mate. the
freshmen were also firing more than usual.
Richard Rellford came out shooting without
hesitation, something that has previously been
missing from the Wolverine attack. In addition to
Rellford, there was Robert Henderson, who laun-
ched some uncharacteristic shots, including a
running hook.
Rockymore's premature departure has also put
more pressure on the inside game, and despite
Illinois' collapsing defense 6-10 Tim McCormick
responded. The center hit on eight-of-nine shots
from the field en route to a career-high 23-point
performance. The Clarkston native took the of-
fensive - literally - as he displayed asser-
tiveness seldom seen this season.
Here we go again
Since the start of his career as a Wolverine,
Turner has been met with adversity. He struggled

until midway through last season when he found
his niche and gained confidence. And this season,
just when things were beginning to gel, his back-
court mate is lost. But Turner believes that he and
Michigan can rebound once again.
"Basically we can get the job done," said the
exhausted Flint native, who notched a team-high
25 points despite taking a hard blow to the face.
"Everyone's going to rise to the occasion. We're
going to have to work hard and play good defen-
se."
Fittingly enough, it seems like Turner is setting
the example for the rest of the team as he has
already met the challenge. Despite having to play
94 of the 95 minutes in two games over the span of
under 48 hours, the 6-3 playmaker responded by
scoring 57 points and 13 assists. In the process he
has begun to rectify his earlier problem of incon-
sistent play.
But, characteristically, Turner is not totally
pleased. "We have to stop making the same men-
tal errors. We're not a young club anymore, and
we're going to have to start doing some things bet-
ter."
Unfortunately, the Wolverines' are forced to
mature earlier since their piece of the Rock has
disappeared.

Doily Photo by JEFF SCHRIER
Robert Henderson (15) soars to the hoop as Illinois forward Anthony Welch
(44) looks on. Henderson and his mates were outlasted by the Illini, 87-74,
and dropped their fourth game in a row.
THE. SPORTING VIEWS

I

MEN*
:. - X" X X, X:

M women
swimmers
splash by
IU, 85-64

By ADAM SCHWARTZ
Because of record-setting perfor-
mances and the team's overall depth,
the Michigan women's swimming team
soundly defeated Indiana University,
85-64, yesterday afternoon at Matt
Mann pool.
Michigan coach Stu Isaac said that
"it was the other people that really won
the meet for us." He cited Sherry Car-
twright, Chris Hodson, and Diane
Dudeck as three people who played key
roles in the victory.
HODSON finished first in the 100- and
200-yard individual medley and second
in the 200-yard backstroke. Cartwright
finished second in the 100-yard butterfly
and third in the 100-yard individual
medley. Dudeck won the one-meter

dive over the former one-meter
national champion, Lona Foss.
The Wolverines once again got out-
standing performances from Melinda
Copp, Denise Stuntzner, and Naomi
Marubashi. Copp finished third in the
100-yard breaststroke, first in the 100-
yard backstroke, (setting a new pool
record), and she finished first in the
200-yard backstroke, setting a new pool
record and aualifying for the nationals
with a time of 2:05.28 Stuntzner took
first in the 200-yard butterfly (in which
she set a new pool record).Marubashi
finished second in the 50-yard freestyle
and set a pool record in the 100-yard
freestyle with a time of :52.40.
"THE MEET was not as close as we
expected," said Isaac, 'yet it started

out that way." The meet started out
with Indiana winning the 200-yard
medley relay. Michigan continued to
trail through the next six events before
finally taking the lead when Stuntzner
won the 200-yard freestyle. The
Wolverines put the meet away by
finishing first and second in the 200-yard
backstroke and immediately following
that with a one-two finish in the 200-
yard breaststroke.
The Wolverines will now concentrate
on the Big Ten Championships Feb. 24-
26. Their next dual meet is today at
Michigan State. "Michigan State will
give us a chance for people to swim
their off events in preparation for
the Big Ten Championships," said
Isaac.

Super 'D' .
... Hogs and Killer Bees
By DOUGLAS B. LEVY
D EFENSE wins football games.
Super Bowl XVII features two teams, the Miami Dolphins and
Washington Redskins, that play superb defense.
The most interesting development in this match-up is the anonymity of the
two defensive units. Take the Re dskins for example. They are the ones that
should be tagged with a "no-name" defense moniker. Who are the three
starting linebackers for Washington? Neal Olkewicz, Mel Kaufman and
Rich Milot.
The great thing is, these guys really play solid defense.
But it is not the Redskin defense that has neared perfection. The Miami
Dolphin defense, created by defensive coordinator Bill Arnsparger and kn-
own as the "Killer Bees", is the story of this Super Bowl Tournament.
As is the case with Washington, very few football fans can identify the
members of the Dolphin defense. Miami's defense epitomizes team play,
just as the original bunch of no-names did back in the early 1970's.
Defense is the reason Washington and Miami are in Super Bowl XVII.
Not Joe Theismann, John Riggins, David Woodley, or Andra Franklin. And
defense is the reason why Miami will defeat Washington.
What happened to San Diego and New York was no fluke. Dan Fouts and
Richard Todd each threw five interceptions, each were sacked and
pressured throughout, and each saw their superstar cast of receivers
covered to perfection.
If Miami did all this to the Chargers and the Jets, then Theismann, Charlie
Brown, Alvin Garrett, Virgil Seay, and Don Warren are in for a long,
exasperating Super Bowl.
Let's not forget to mention Washington's glorified offensive line-the
"Hogs"-which opens the huge holes for Riggins to plow through. The Hogs,
another collection of total unknowns, have played inspired football. But they
are certainly no better than the respective lines of the Chargers and Jets.
The question then, is whether Miami quarterback Woodley can put points
on the board against Washington. The answer is yes. Don Shula will guide his
offensive stars: Duriel Harris, Nat Moore, Joe Rose, Bruce Hardy, Tony
Nathan, and Andra Franklin (who is better than Riggins), to a successful af-
ternoon.
The play of the special teams may, however, prove to be crucial. Mike
Nelms of the Redskins had a dynamite season and is always a threat to
break off a long gain. For Miami, Fulton Walker, another no-name, is also a
threat at any time.
The place-kicking advantage of Mark Moseley over Uwe von Schamann
could also be a factor. The punting games are equally solid.
Super Bowl XVII should be very exciting if you appreciate excellent
defensive football. The Dolphins and Redskins play the brand of football
worthy of world champion status. In this particular game, at this point in
time, look for the Killer Bees to sting the Hogs.

4

4

Spartans brawl

past Blue

14

By CHUCK JAFFE
Last night, 8,113 boxing fans filled Yost
Ice Arena to watch Michigan play
Michigan State, and a hockey game
broke out.
The two teams punched, kicked,
slashed, held and danced their way
through the evening, and although the
Wolverines had the knockout punches,
the Spartans scored thepoints to come
away with a 2-1 decision.
IN ALL, 31 penalties were called, both
teams played at less than full strength
for nine consecutive minutes and the
goaltending was spectacular. Never-
theless, it was Michigan's lone defen-
sive mix-up that allowed the Spartans'
Rob Martin to break in and score the
winning goal.
With the puck at center ice, Michigan
attempted to change lines to remove its
penalty-killing team. Instead, only four
Wolverines went out to skate, and
Michigan State immediately stole the
puck and fed it to Martin in the
Michigan zone. The senior right winger
faked Michigan goalie Mark Chiamp to
his knees before flipping the puck into
the upper right hand corner of the net.
"We were caught in a line change,"

seconds left. As the Wolverines fought
for a score, Michigan State cleared the
puck, and Michigan's Todd Carlile
picked it up with 10 seconds left. Carlile
skated through the Spartan defense and
was headed for the net when an MSU
defender checked his stick from his
hands. The Michigan defenseman
didn't stop skating, however, and
brought both hands into Scott's
facemask, leaving the Spartan goalten-
der motionless on the ice.
Scott was then the only motionless
player on the ice, as both sides started
to brawl. MSU's Dale Krentz left the
bench to attack Carlile in the penalty
box. The Spartans' Martin, in the MSU
penalty box for an earlier infraction,
thrust his stick over the scorer's table
to hit-Carlile, and the crowd loved every
minute.
"IT WAS a really cheap shot," said
Michigan State coach Ron Mason. "If
he's going to do something like that,

then he's going to have to expect
retaliation, and he's going to get it
whenever he plays against Michigan
State."
"He wasn't sent out there to make a
run at (Scott)," said Giordano. "I think
it was just a hard, tough hockey game.
We didn't try to play physical, we just
tried to play hockey."
The hockey that was played between
the teams' scuffles was the best seen at
Yost Ice Arena this season. Michigan
State's Dan McFall whistled a low
slapshot between Chiamp's stick and
the goalpost just 3:32 into the game, but
the Wolverines' Tom Stiles countered
less than four minutes later.
Stiles stuffed the rebound of a Paul
Kobylarz shot into the Spartan net at
7:21, and the game tightened up. Before
the period was over, the teams had
been whistled 22 times, and both teams
sent five players to the penalty box at
once. The result was wide open, three-

on-three hockey that stretched from
end-to-end, with Chiamp and Scott
trading spectacular stops.
"I'd call that knock 'em-down, grind
'em-out hockey," said Mason. "I think
we deserved to win, even though the
score was close, because we had more
scoring opportunities, and we needed
them to beat Chiamp."
The win extended MSU's unbeaten
streak against the Wolverines to nine
games, and raised its record to 22-6.
Michigan fell to 11-17.

14

Wolverine men, women gymnasts

A

battle Goliath--li
By PAULA SCHIPPER and
PAUL RESNICK
Gymnastics coach Newt Loken calls it a "David and
Goliath" confrontation.
The Michigan men's gymnastics team must go all out if it
hopes to slay national giants Nebraska and Ohio State on the
co-ed meet at Crisler Arena today.

e opponents
Michigan's strength, the floor exercise, wil be the first
event today. It will be followed by the team's weak point -
the pommel horse.
"It could be neck and neck if the pommel horse goes well,"
said Loken. "We're ready to crowd the two top teams in the
nation."
For the women, it will be Ohio State that looms as a goliath.
According to coach Sheri Hyatt, top recruits have helped the

Out- fought

FIRST PERIOD

Penalties: M-Stles (roughing)>10:10; MSU-McFal
(roughing) 10:10.

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