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January 29, 1983 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-01-29

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4

Page 2-Saturday, January 29, 1983-The Michigan Daily

Drummer
Buddy
Rich stable
after heart
attack
(Continued from Page 1)
to Eclipse Jazz Co-coordinator Peter
Pretsfelder.
The Buddy Rich Band is going to con-
tinue its tour, Pretsfelder said. Its next
engagement is at Macomb County
Community College.
Eclipse Jazz Co-coordinator Larry
Bram said the organization waited to
announce the drummer's attack until
his family could be notified. "We're
greatly concerned about his health and
wish him the best of luck and a speedy
recovery, "Pretsfelder said.
ALTHOUGH ticket refunds were
ayailable, Bram said he didn't think
many people were turning in their
tickets.
Eclipse stage manager Andy Raub-
Yogel echoed Brain: "People have been
real responsive about staying for the
music."
Ticket holders can still pick up refun-
ds at any Convenient Ticket Company
(CTC) outlet or at the place of pur-
chase, according to Eclipse ticket
. anager Gina Speckman.t
Wallet stolen
A wallet valued at $3 was stolen from
a house on the 300 block of Southt
division between 8:30 a.m. and 4 p.m.
on Thursday. Police said they did not
know how entry was gained and are1
eontinuing their investigation.

White collar strike
Police moved in to control striking government workers as they picketed in front of a building in Montreal yesterday.
About 115,000 employees including nurses and hospital workers walked out in a contract dispute.
Nuclear-free zone may not

affe ct
MOSCOW (UPI) - A St
to create a nuclear-free z
Europe would not affect
range nuclear warheE
already has in place,
diplomat said yesterday.
The official Tass news
the Soviet Union would
negotiate a ban on battl
weapons in a 370-mile-w
tered on the East Germ
man border.

medium-range
.iet proposal Battlefield weapons are those with a
one in central short range and would not include the
the medium- medium-range SS-20s, SS-4s, and SS-s
ads Moscow which NATO is trying to counter by
a Western deploying cruise and Pershing-2
missiles in starting at the end of 1983,
agency said the Western diplomat said.
be willing to NATO DEPLOYS short-range
efiliglea weapons against the numerically
efie nuclearen- superior Warsaw Pact troops and
ian-West Ger- tanks.
The diplomat said Moscow was trying
to undermine NATO's policy of flexible
response, which refers to the West's
dents decision to recognize the possible
I. necessity of using nuclear weapons to
stop the onslaught of a Soviet tank
thrust across the Iron Curtain.
est "We are trying to reduce the danger
of surprise attack by either side by
lowering the level of forces (through
) stage several talks in Vienna) . . . Their proposal
elected soy seeks to hinder NATO's capacity to
have a con- carry out the defense of Europe through
She said the _
Meahactions to enSool

missiles
its strategy of flexible response," he
said.
THOSE SESSIONS, the Mutual and
Balanced Force Reduction Talks (MB-
FR), resumed Thursday after a six-
week recess. They have been
deadlocked for 10 years. Medium-range
weapons are under discussion in
Geneva.
The Soviet proposal was couched as a
response to a suggestion from an East-
West commission headed by Swedish
prime Minister Olog Palme to establish
a 185-mile-wide zone.
When the commission proposed the
nuclear-free zone last summer, the
Soviet delegate demurred on 'the
grounds such weapons could be quickly
moved back into the zone.
"What's to stop them - or us -
moving weapons quickly back into a
600-kilometer-wide zone as well?" the
diplomat said.
enrollment

Natural Resources stu
divert tuition in prot4

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Bomb kills 33 in PLO building
BEIRUT, Lebanon - A car packed with explosives blew up outside a build-
ing used by the Palestine Liberation Organization in eastern Lebanon
yesterday, killing at least 33 guerrillas in an avalanche of shattered con-
crete.
The Voice of Lebanon radio, controlled by the Lebanese Christian militias,
said a Dodge Dart packed with 220 pounds of high explosives had exploded
outside the three-story building near Shtaura, 30 miles east of Beirut.
The car explosion spread a fire into the basement, causing a massive
second explosion in ammunition stored there and flattened the building, the
radio said.
Seven pedestrians walking near the building were seriously wounded by
the noon blast on the western edge of Lebanon's Bekaa valley, police said.
Another bomb exploded late last night a a shoe shop in west Beirut's
Hamra shopping thoroughfare and witnesses said at least five people were
wounded.
Israeli Defense Minister asks
for dialogue with Soviet Union
Israeli Defense Minister Ariel Sharon, complaining in interviews published
yesterday that the United States had blocked progress-in the negotiations
with Lebanon, invited the Soviet Union to talk with Israel.
"Come, let us meet. Israel and the Soviet Union. there's something to talk
about," Sharon told the Israeli Ma'ariv newspaper, apparently responding
to talk in Washington of cutting aid to Israel to speed its withdrawal from
Lebanon,
The Soviet Union, which broke relations with Israel in 1967, has been the
chief arms supplier to several of the Jewish state's Arab enemies, in-
cluding the Palestine Liberation Organization.
In Washington, Deputy White House Press Secretary Larry Speakes said
any contacts between the Israelis and the Soviets "is the business of the
Israelis."
The publication of the Sharon interviews in Ma'ariv and the Israeli newsp-
aper Yedioth Ahronoth came after he made a quick, secret visit to east
Beirut Thursday to meet with Lebanese Chistian leaders.
Reagan's 1984 budget: less
social spending, more defense
WASHINGTON - President Reagan will propose an $848 billion 1984 budget
that would cut Medicare and retirement costs, freeze domestic programs,
and increase defense spening for an $189 billion deficit, sources said yester-
day.
The budget, which will be submitted to Congress Monday, would reduce
projected federal deficits by $43 billion in fiscal 1984 and a total of $558 billion
over the next five years, congressional sources said.
If the budget were enacted, federal deficits would drop from $189 billion in
1984 to $117 billion in 1988, they said. The first $1 trillion budget would occur
in 1987.
As Reagan outlined in his State of the Union address Tuesday night, most
domestic spending is frozen at current levels. Direct spending for defense in
1984 would increase $30 billion over this year's level.
Reagan: MIAs national priority
WASHINGTON - Finding out what happened to the 2,494 Americans miss-
ing in Southeast Asia is of "the highest national priority," President Reagan
told their families yesterday.
"Your government is attentive and the intelligence assets of the United
States are fully focused on this issue," Reagan said, a declaration that
brought a standing ovation from 550 people at a meeting of the National
League of Families of POWs and MIAs.
Ten years after America officially ended its involvement in Vietnam and
591 U.S. prisoners were released, 2,494 servicement remain listed as missing
in action.
The Pentagon says it has looked into more than 478 such reports, which
have surfaced since 1975 when North Vietnam completed its takeover of
South Vietnam.
Pentagon officials said Wednesday that they still must determine whether
there is any basis to 220 of the 478 reports. Defense Intelligence Agency of-
ficials must inform Congress periodically about the status of their attempts
to pin down whether the reports have any validity.
"I pledge to you that we will take decisive action on any live sighting
reports that can be confirmed," Reagan told the gathering.
Solidarity urges general strike
WARSAW, Poland - Underground leaders of the outlawed Solidarity
labor federation urged Poland's workers yesterday to prepare for a nation-
wide sit-in strike and to continue boycotting the Communist government's
new unions.
Solidarity's clandestine "temporary coordinating commission," delivered
an eight-page leaflet to Western correspondents, which broke a two-month
silence by the five-man committee. The committee had been keeping quiet
since its call for nationwide demonstrations on Nov. 10 failed and it canceled
a week of strikes and protests in December.
By urging preparations for a general strike rather than setting a date for
one, it appeared to be testing its support among the workers as well as

urging its supporters to organizational work.
Solidarity chairman Lech Walesa said he agrees with the aims of the un-
derground but does not favor a strike.
"The objective is the same, but there are many ways of reaching it," he
said. "At present a strike is not part of my program, but some day I may
decide that such a method is needed."
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription iates: $7.50 in Ann Arbor; $8 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Ar-
bor, MI. 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syn-
dicate and Field Enterprises Newspaper Syndicate.
News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 763-0379,; Circulation,
764-0558; Classified Advertising, 764-0554; Billing, 764-0550.

(Continued from Page 1)
requirement, the student would not get
credit for it (the check) and would still
owe us money," said Student Financial
Operations Manager. Alexander
M4akarewich.
While the checks could be interpreted
as donations to SNR since they are en-
dorsed for deposit into its general fund,
University Cashier James Gribble said
the checks would probably just be
returned to the student.
"We have no vehicle. . . for a
ayment into a general fund account in
at manner," Gribble said.
THE TUITION protest is only one of a
Series of activities students planned at
A meeting last Thursday afternoon. In
addition, they plan to contact all of the
The ancient city of Pompeii was
completely covered by the volcanic
eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79.
The remains of about 2,000 victims of a
population of 20,000 have been found in
excavations of the city.

Regents personally and to
more events to attract stu,
"The Regents are an e
Tableman said. "They
stituency to serve."S
protests are symbolica
courage the Regents n
stamp" the budget decis
ministration.
Administrators are exp
a final decision on the
within the next three w
Regents will have the o
review that decision a
February meeting.

4

of to ruier
ions of the ad-
pected to issue
school's fate
eeks, and the
opportunity to
at their mid-

may be cut 25 percent

Correction
A letter printed in yesterday's Daily
("Review cripples Nat. Res.") in-
correctly read "The review committee
recommended an increase in the num-
ber of students." The letter should have
read, ". . . an increase in the number of
PhD. students."

(Continued from Page 1)
enrollment decrease and allocations for
the new hospital presently under con-
struction.
Varner also expressed a concern that
there were not enough minority
physicians. "My concern is (whether)
if we cut back on enrollment there will
remain in place an effective affir-
mative action program," she said.
Ward agreed with Varner and said he
"does not think any program of
(enrollment) reduction would be
allowed to interfere with minority
enrollments. It would be unthinkable."
WARD ALSO SAID that a drop in the
number of students may force some

4(burrb U nr0I ip *tUIE n

faculty members to move into resear-
ch, but said he hopes any reduction
would result in increased faculty-
student contact.
Although he said he has not really
researched or discussed the issue with
other Regents, Baker does not expect
the measure to pass easily at their
February meeting. "There should be
some charged discussion," he said.
Associate medical school Prof. Jay
Harness said the state's attempts to
reduce Medicaid costs will endanger
indigent people who would not other-
wise receive full health care.
HARNESS, ALSO chief surgeon at
Wayne County Hospital, admitted that
"some of the demand (for medical
care) is in a little way created by
physicians."
Students asked about the proposed
reduction said they thought the
enrollment reduction was the lesser of
two evils. Inteflex student Bill Richar-
dson said he fears the reduction may
make the school elitist, but he prefers it
to a 30 percent tuition hike.
"Still, they couldn't be doing that
badly if they managed to put up the
money for the new hospital," Richar-
dson said.
THE HOSPITAL, however, is more of
an investment, Ward said, and was
begun two years ago when there was a
greater faith in the state's economy.
As the urgency for a final decision on
enrollment reductions looms, the
Regents will likely take up the matter
at their next meeting Feb. 17.

14

14

CREATION SCIENCE MEETING
Angell Hall, Room 229
Every Thursday Night-7:00 p.m.
All are welcome. "Let there
fight.''
*t*i

be

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
4511 Washtenaw
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
Sunday services 9:15 a.m. and 10:30
a.m.
Sunday morning Bible Study 9:15
a.m.
Wednesday evening Bible Study 9:30

p.m.

* * .*

FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
Guest Speaker: Ed Hoff
Jan. 30-"It's a Beginning."
Special Worship Service-Access
Sunday.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
and 11:00a.m.
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at
7:15 p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directors:
Rose McLean and Carol Bennington
* . s
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
(The Campus Ministry
of the LCA-ALC-AELC)
Galen Hora, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St. 668-7622Y
Worship Sunday at 10:30 a.m.
Choir Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Volleyball Fri. at 7:00 p.m.
Tues. 8:30 p.m.-Bible Study Group,
North Campus.
* * *

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
FOUNDATION
502 East Huron, 663-9376
Guest Speaker: Reverend T. J. Ging.
Jan. 30-"The Mouth House."
Student Study Group-Thursday 6:00
p.m.
10:00 a.m. Sunday Worship. Child
care provided.
11:00 a.m.-Church School. Classes
for all ages. Class for undergraduates.
Class for graduates and faculty.
Also:
Choir Thursday 7:15 p.m., John Reed,
director; Janice Beck, organist.
Ministry Assistants: Marlene Francis,
Terry Ging, Barbara Griffen, Jerry
Rees.
* * *
NEW GRACE APOSTOLIC CHURCH
632 N. Fourth Ave.
Rev. Avery Dumas Jr., Pastor
9:45 a.m. Sunday School.
11:45 Morning Worship
7:00 p.m. Evening Service
Bible Study-Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.
For rides call 761-1530
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
ld2.,, hnni A eoA D

ST. MARY'S
$TUDENT CHAPEL
4 Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557 y
Weekly Masses:
Mon.-Wed.-5:10 p.m.
: Thurs.-Fri.-12:10 p.m.
Sat.-7:00 p.m.
Sun.-8:30 and 10:30 a.m. (Upstairs
and downstairs)
:12 noon and 5 p.m. (upstairs and
downstairs)
North Campus Mass at 9:30 a.m. in
Bursley Hall (Fall and Winter Terms)
Rite of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5 p.m.
on Friday only; any other time by

.
.C

9

I

Editor inchief
Managing Editor...
News Editor
Student Affairs Editor
University Editor
Opinion Page Editors
Arts Magazine Editor
Associate Arts Magozine Editor
Sports Editor
Associate Sports Editors -

DAVID MEYER
PAMELA KRAMER
ANDREW CHAPMAN
ANN MARIE FAZIO
MARK GINDIN
JULIE HINDS
CHARLES THOMSON
RICHARD CAMPBELL
BEN TICHO
BOB WOJNOWSKI
BARB BARKER
LARRY FREED
JOHN KERR
RON POLLACK
.BRIAN MASCK
Pete Sinclair Jon

Robin Kopilnick. Doug Levy, Tim Mokinen. Mike
McGraw, Larry Mishkin. Lisa Noferi, Rob Pollard. Don
Price. Jeff Quicksilver. Paul Resnick. Wendy Rocho.
Lenny Rosenb. urn, Scott Salowich. John Toyer. Judy
Walton. Karl Wheatley, Chvck Whitman. Rich Wiener.
Steve Wise.
BUSINESS MANAGER ........SAM t. SLAUGHTER IV
SALES MANAGER................... . MEG GIBSON
DISPLAY MANAGER ................... JEFF VOIGT
OPERATIONS MANAGER.........LAURIE ICZKOVITZ
CLASSIFIEDS MANAGER ..............,PAM GILLERY
NATIONAL MANAGER .................GITA PILLAI
FINANCE MANAGER ................ MARK HORITA
ASSISTANT DISPLAY MANAGER ..... NANCY GUSSIN
SALES COORDINATOR ........ E. ANDREW PETERSEN
CIRCULATION MANAGER.............KIM KENDALL

Photoorophy Editor.
ARTISTS Norm Christionsen.

I

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