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January 28, 1983 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-01-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Mideast ti
KIRYAT SHMONA, Israel (AP) -
Israel and Lebanon said they made
'imarked progress" yesterday on
agreements to end hostile propaganda
aknd to establish future liaison between
0 thie two governments.
But the apparent key obstacle on the
road to withdrawing foreign troops
from Lebanon - Israel's demand to
man listening posts in Lebanon - was
riot discussed at the latest round of
negotiations, conference sources said.
A COMMUNIQUE read to, reporters
by Lebanese and Israeli spokesmen
said, "Marked progress was made,
especially on the issues of liaison and
the end to hostile propaganda."
They said the negotiations involved
three subcommittees, discussing with-
drawal and security arrangements,
future relations between the two coun-

alks spur optimism

The Michigan Daily-
Prosecutor

-Friday, January 28, 1983-Page 7

see

tries and possible guarantees of
whatever agreement comes out of the
talks.
There was no indication of what sort
of "liaison" was envisaged, but in the
past, Israeli officials have expressed
the hope that Lebanon will allow them
to maintain the office staffed by
Foreign Ministry personnel in the
Beirut suburb of Baabda shortly after
Israel invaded June 6 to smash the
Palestine Liberation Organization.
THE SPOKESMEN also announced
that for the first time since talks began
last month, the subcommittees would
meet outside the framework of formal
negotiations, which have been taking
place twice a week and alternating
between the Beirut suburb of Khalde
and the Israeli border town of Kiryat
Shmona.

Subcommittees will meet next
Tuesday and Wednesday in the
Mediterranean resort city of Netanya,
20 miles north of Tel Aviv, and move to
Lebanon the following week, said
spokesmen Atef Tarabe of Lebanon and
Israel's Avi Pazner.
The latest talks came amid reports of
growing U.S. criticism of Israel for
allegedly putting obstacles in the way
of progress. One U.S. official told repor-
ters in Washington that Israel "is being
extremely stubborn and unhelpful on
Lebanon," and claimed Israel was not
taking reasonable positions.
THE UNITED STATES is refusing to
back Israel's demand for three to five
listening posts in southern Lebanon to
monitor the area in case Palestinian
guerrillas try to infiltrate back to the
border with Israel.

Begin
... remains optimistic on Mideast

funds for drug
SAULT STE. MARIE (AP) - Facing 75 - the other,
what he sees as a lively narcotics trade he said. "It1
and a budget fit for a dogcatcher, a catch people j
prosecutor in rural Michigan is raising bridge with a.
money from ordinary citizens for the CONCERN
fight against drug smuggling. - 'about the s
Chippewa County Prosecutor Patrick was inadequa
Shannon at first made a private appeal in the mainly
for funds but he didn't get enough. So pealed to loca
last week he went on the radio and October.
pleaded with the public. He saidt
"AFTER THAT.. . people were sen- couraging, bu
ding me checks," Shannon said. "A went public.
janitor gave me $25." association ti
He's raised $8,000 so far, in donations .003 percent+
and a pledge from the county's town- collections f
ship association, which agreed to use a Shannon est
piece of the property tax collections for about $4,700 t
the drug war. $3,400 already
Some of the money will be used to Shannon sa
make undercover drug buys, and Shan- with state, cc
non eventually wants to set up a drug cement offic
investigation squad. oversee use o
"WE HAVE A drug trade here that's "They hav
going right into Canada," Shannon cover buys or
said, although federal drug enfor- like to orga
cement efforts are aimed south. Shan- vestigation s
non's Upper Peninsula jurisdiction dards, the cot
faces Ontario across the St. Marys seem minor.
River. the county's
"We're at the very end of Interstate year involved

king
squa4
end is southern Florida,
hasn't been uncommon to
just a mile or two from the
pound of grass," he said.
ED that his $58,000 budget
ize of the dogcatcher's";-
te for policing drug traffic
rural county; Shannon ap"
al service clubs for cash iii
the response was erd-
ut not overwhelming, so hi
The county's township
,hen pledged to turn over
of township property tax
for drug enforcement.
imated that would add
o his treasury to augment
y collected.
id he will meet next month
ounty and city law enfoi-
ials to set up a panel to
f the money.
e money now for undet-
r whatever," he said. "I'd
anize a special drug in-
quad." By big city star,--
inty's drug problem might
But Shannon said two df
four homicides in the pad
d drugs.

ew ruld
Ne atceclink forces of nature

.
G ;
k~
G
aa
r '
AP Photo
Where's the U?
Two signs on Interstate 25 near Las Vegas can't agree on how to spell
Albuquerque. The nearer sign forgot about the "u" in the second syllable.

NEW YORK (AP) - The apparent
discovery of a particle named "W"
seems to provide strong support for an
aspect of the "grand unification
theory," an attempt to link the basic
forces of nature.
The apparent discovery was made by
a group headed by Carlo Rubbia of
Harvard University, a leader of the
team at the European Laboratory of
Particle Physics, known as CERN.
THE GRAND unification theory
holds that all four of nature's basic for-
ces have evolved from a single force,
which was created in the first flashes of
the "big bang," the cosmic explosion
that created the universe.
The theory would provide physicists
with a much greater understanding of
the universe, and would give them clues
to the questions of how it was formed
and how, and if, it will end.
Researchers around the world have
been racing to find the "W" particle,
with the general understanding that to
the victors will go a Nobel Price in
physics and a place in the history of
science.
RUBBIA, WHO announced his results
Wednesday at the annual meeting of the
American Physical Society, reported
finding only five "clean events" in the
debris of a particle collision in the ac-
celerator, or atom smasher, at CERN,
indicating the presence of "W" par-
ticles.
A second group of researchers at

CERN, in competition with Rubbia's
group, reported at the same time fin-
ding four "events" that might be "W"
particle "tracks," but did not claim this
as definite proof. In reporting the fin-
ding, Allan Rothenberg of CERN said
only that the "events" were candidates
for designation as "W" particles.
This race reminded physicists at the
meeting of a similar competition a few
years ago when groups led by Burton
Richter of Stanford and Samuel Ting of
the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology fought to be first to
discover what came to be called the "J-
psi" particle.
BOTH GROUPS discovered particles
almost simultaneously, one naming it
"J" and the other "psi." They shared
the Nobel Prize in 1976. Richter also
was part of the current race for the
"W" particle.
The CERN accelerator is essentially
a circular tunnel, four miles around,
under the French-Swiss border. Billions
of protons, which along with neutrons
make up the nucleus of the atom, are
fired against a beam of antiprotons in
it.
A computer analysis of the billions of
resulting collisions produced the five
"clean events," and "confirms the
discovery of the 'W' intermediate vec-
tor boson postulated by the unified
theory of weak and electromagnetic in-
teractions," the lab said.

r

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NR students fight budget
cuts in review's final days

(Continued from Page 1)
past year. the Ann Arbor meeting will
pull together the facts uncovered at the
earlier sessions, Daily said.
In addition to Ford and Carter, who
were together previously for the
funeral of Anwar Sadat in October,
1981, the conference will include
television producer Norman Lear,
creator of "All in the Family," former
Secretary of Health, Education, and
Welfare David Matthews, who now
heads the Kettering Foundation,
Harland Cleveland, director of the
University of Minnesota's Hubert
Humphrey Institute, John Gardner,
HEW iecretary-in. the -Kennedy ad-
ministration, and former University
Professor of Education Wilbur Cohen, a
key figure in the drafting of the Social

Security Act of 1935.
SEVERAL congressional leaders
also have been invited, but none have
committed yet, library director Wilson
said.
Other contributors to the Domestic
Policy Association are the Johnson
Foundation of Wisconsin, the Benton
Foundation of Chicago, and the Public
Agenda Foundation of New York.
In addition to local and national press
coverage, the conference will be
televised via closed-circuit television to
145 sites nationwide so that some 9,000
participants from the smaller forums
may participate.
The forum is open by invitation only
due to the limited size of the
auditorium.

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(Continued from Page 1)
} University Vice-President for
Academic Affairs Billy Frye said he
would probably release a final decision
on the school's budget before the mid-
February Regents meeting.
"SNR students expect Frye's decision
to mirror the review committee's
suggested one-third cut.
WHEN THE review committee's
report was released last month, the
school issued its own budget proposal,
calling for only a 20 percent reduction.
} The 20 percent plan is "one of our best
options," SNR graduate student
Charles Griffith said after the meeting,
"but nobody's going to be happy with
that." He said the Regents would
probably be receptive to the students
because they are not directly involved
with the administration's five-year
redirection plan, which he called "the
smaller but better hoax."
After the meeting, the students don-
DAYTONA INN
BROADWAY
Is
SPRING
r BREAK
HEADQUARTERS
IN
Call now for
- -; wn $,%atin ,4Ura va4

ned green ribbons "to show solidarity,"
and said they would distribute the rib-
bons around campus to make the
school's plight more visible.

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