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January 20, 1983 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SPORTS
The Michigan Daily Thursday, January 20, 1983 Page 7

By LARRY FREED
Special to the Daily
COLUMBUS - After last week'
sweep, Bill Frieder might feel a littl
drunk with success when he sees doubl
on the court tonight in Columbus.
The Michigan coach is always ston
Isober when it comes to basketball, bu
he still will have difficulty decipherin
the carbon-copy Buckeyes.
OHIO STATE and Michigan bot
send the same type of lineup onto th
floor: a backcourt composed of quic
sharpshooting guards and a frontlin

cagers may see
which consists of strong, heavy- Buckeyes defensively, Turner and DES]
rebounding big men. Rockymore will have to get on track of- Buckey
s The Wolverine sophomore tandem of fensively. Rockymore showed signs of reason
e Eric Turner and Leslie Rockymore will life against the Badgers when he tallied young t
e have its hands full with the Buckeye a career-high 23 points, on 10-of-14 well.
trio of Troy Taylor (15.3 ppg), Larry shooting. Turner, however, is coming "The
i (1)nd Ron Stokes (9.3) . off his weakest performance as a Rockym

double at OSU

PITE Turner's sluggish play,
ye coach Eldon Miller still sees
for concern. "Michigan is a
eam and they have been playing
ir guards, Turner and
more, are especially difficult to

rebounds). Miller can also send out
forwards Joe Concheck (6-8) or Keith
Wesson (6-9).
THAT TASK will be left up to Tim
McCormick, who has played inspired of
late, Richard Rellford, Robert Hender-
son and Butch Wade, who continues to
see more action each game.
"They're big and strong up front,"
Frieder said of the Buckeyes. "We'll
have to try to match up well with them
inside."

While the two squads parallel each
other in many facets, unfortunately all
of these facets are not positive - such
as their lack of success on the road.
If Turner and Rockymore can start
hitting more consistently from the out
side, then the intense inside struggle
will be loosened up. And if that hap-
pens, look for Miller and Frieder to be
rubbing their eyes when they see double
on the court.

e
it
g
h
e
k,
e

Huggns k.u anu u .w~ kz.
While Michigan's duo was supposed to
wreak the most havoc on the league
with its long-range bombing, it has in-
stead been the combination of Huggins
(6-1) and Taylor (5-10) who have filled
up the hoop with three pointers.
In addition to trying to stop the

THE LINE UPS
MICHIGAN OHIO STATE

Straight from the
source's mouth
By RON POLLACK
Fund raising: The way to
overcome financial barriers
W HILE MICHIGAN football players grumble that there aren't enough
baked potatoes on the training table and basketball players raise a
fuss over the Holiday Inn beds being too small on road trips, a number of
Wolverine athletes fight for mere survival.
Performers on Michigan's minor sports teams do not enjoy the luxuries of
the football and basketball teams. It is easy to complain. It is smart to do
something about it.
Most Michigan minor sports athletes have been smart.
A perfectly good example is the Wolverine women's tennis team, which
has greatly bolstered its finances with a number of fund-raising activities.
During this school year, the women netters have sold football programs at
games, raffled off a couple of tennis rackets and held a 24-hour tennis-a-thon.
The team earned $1,000 for selling the programs; $200 from the raffle and
expects to collect between $1,300 and $1,500 from the January 7 tennis-a-thon.
In addition, the women's tennis players teach twice a semester for four
hours on Sundays at the Huron Valley Tennis Club. In exchange for this ser-
vice, the players receive free court time to practice.'
"The athletic department doesn't require that they teach, I require that,"
said head coach Ollie Owens. "I don't think they're (the players) par-
ticularly happy about it. But it's a good trade off, because the Track and
Tennis Building courts are a slow surface. So it's good to get out and play on
en fst gcourts at Huron. Also, with track meets and fairs, the Track and
Tennis Building gets closed.
"I think it's good for them to have to raise some of their own funds,"
Owens added. "But it's tough on them when they see other programs not
have to do that. So that may bother them. But I don't think it's unbelievably
tough."
Where there's a will . .
Apparently it's not unbelievably tough for other Michigan teams either.
In order to help pay for a meet in Hawaii (December 19 to January 6), the
women's swimming team held a swim-a-thon, conducted a letter-writing
campaign asking for contributions, and spent some money of its own.
The softball team will pay for a spring trip to California with money ear-
ned from selling programs, running a softball clinic in February, and
holding beer-and-pizza nights.
The last beer-and-pizza night was held the evening of the Michigan-Ohio
State football game, and $400 was earned. A similar event will be held
tomorrow night (9 p.m.) at the local American Legion Hall. The pizzas are
donated by Domino's, and the team is getting a good deal on the hall and the
beer from the American Legion, said softball head coach Bob DeCarolis.
"The community helps out," said DeCarolis. "They know it's for a good
cause.''
The women's gymnastics team has a meet in Oregon (February 25-26). To
help pay for this, it held both a raffle and a trick-a-thon. A trick-a-thon is
where the female gymnasts do a series of gymnastics maneuvers for a price.
To save money, the men's gymnastics squad puts up and takes down the
equipment at its meets, while the baseball team takes the tarp both on and
off the field at games.
These may not seem like the greatest hardships in the world, but it's hard
to imagine Anthony Carter or Steve Smith carrying the field markers and
game balls onto the Michigan Stadium field before a game.
"Basically, when you get into non-revenue sports, you have to do things to
help yourself out," said Michigan Associate Athletic Director Don Lund.
And this is exactly what so many Michigan athletes are doing. And it is for
this that they should be commended. Their situations are far from ideal, and
they most certainly would trade places and budgets with football or basket-
ball players in a second.
But they can't. So they do the next best thing; they do something to rectify
the situation.
It's refreshing to know that the desire to compete is so strong among these
athletes that they are willing to battle and overcome barriers - both large
and small.
:Pistons down Bucks

(15)
(40)
(44)
(25)
(24)

Robert Henderson.. (6-9)
Richard Rellford.... (6-6)
Tim McCormick... (6-10)
Eric Turner.........(6-3)
Leslie Rockymore.. (6-4)

F
F
C
G
G

(42) Joe Concheck.....(6-7)
(00) Tony Campbell.....(6-6)
(13) Granville Waiters.. (6-11)
(14) Troy Taylor........(5-11)
(20) Larry Huggins...... (6-3)

G-S FG-FGA

Game time is 8:05 p.m. at St. John Arena. The game will be
broadcast on WAAM (1600 AM), WCBN (88.3 FM), WUOM (91.7
FM), WWJ (950 AM), and WLEN (103.9 FM).

Turner................13-13
Rockymore............14-14
McCormick ..............14-12
Rellford ..................14-11
Person ....................14-7
Henderson.................14-7
Jokisch................14-1
Tarpley .................14-2
Wade .....................11-2
Pelekoudas ................13-1
Antonides................6-0
Brown ......................6-0
Rudy...................6-0
Gibas....................6-
McFarland .... ..........6-0

86-173
87-188
45-89
43-86
39-89
39-88
30-64
28-58
15-32
11-26
3-6
0-5
1-2
0-1
0-1

PCT
.497
.463
.536
.500
.438
.443
.469
.483
.469
.423
.500
.000
.500
.000
.000

FT-FTA
41-74
19-31
46-58
26-34
17-24
15-20
10-13
12-23
5-12
8-13
0-0
2-2
0-0
2-4
0-0

PCT
.554
.613
793
.765
.708
.750
.769
.522
.417
.615
1.000
.500

Michigan Basketball Statistics
AV

49-3.8
45-3.2
95-6.8
48-3.4
73-5.2
90-6.4
4 1-2.9
52-3.7
31-2.8
25-1.9
2-0.3
6-1.0
0-0.0
0-0.0
0-0.0

REB-AVG PTS

220
194
136
114
95
93
70
68
35
30
6'
2
2
2
0

AVG
16.9
13.9
9.7
8.1
6.8
6.6
5.0
4.9
3.2
2.3
1.0
0.3
0.31
0.3
0.0

A
79
38
13
8
16
8
6
4
2
37
'0
0
0'
0
0

Wolverine. Against Wisconsin he tur-
ned the ball over seven times, while
scoring a mere two points.
The two guards will have further
problems as they try to make up for the
loss of Saturday's hero, Dan
Pelekoudas, who will probably miss
tonight's contest (8:05 EST) due to
illness.

contain. This team had an impressive
win over Minnesota last Wednesday, so
they can play some very good basket-
ball."
And Michigan will have to play some
very good basketball if it hopes to con-
tain front-courters Tony Campell (13.0
points and 9.0 rebounds per game) and
6-11 Granville Waiters (6.3 points, 7.3

MICHIGAN................14 427-903
OPPONENTS........... 14 352-804

.47:3 203-310 .655 598-42.7 1067 76.2 111
.438 216-331 .653 457-32.6 935 66.8 153,

EX 'M' ICER SHINES IN NEW JERSEY:
Palmer finds a ni~che

3-point shots: Turner 7-24 (.292); Rockymore 1-7 (.143). MICHIGAN 8-32 (.250); OPPONENTS 15-49 (.306)
SCORES
College Basketball
Maryland 80, Clemson 61
Virginia 74, Virginia Tech 64
gs D eviWake Forest 88, Duke 84
Notre Dame 64, Bucknel 52
NBA
Detroit 107, Milwaukee 106

By JEFFREY BERGIDA
There's a new franchise in the
National Hockey League this season.
The New JerseyDevils (previously the
Colorado Rockies) are based in East
Rutherford, N.J. and are playing in the
sparkling new Brendan Byrne Arena.
Crowds have been consistently large
and enthusiastic throughout the year.
Yes, everything is fine and dandy for
the Garden State's entry in the NHL ex-
cept for the fact that the Devils have
won but 10 of their first 47 games.
Former Michigan defenseman Rob
Palmer has been experiencing the ups
and downs of being part of a rebuilding

NHLers. At one time or another from
1975 through '77, he teamed up with 11
future pros including defenseman Greg
Fox of the Chicago Black Hawks and
Edmonton Oiler forward Pat Hughes.
Yet despite all the talent, the club did
not gel until the secondhalf of Palmer's
senior year, 1977. The '75-76 squad
which was expected to be a national
contender finished fourth in its con-
ference and lost Hughes and former
Philadelphia goaltender Robbie Moore.
Great things were not anticipated for
1976-77.
But the Michigan icers pulled off a
major surprise, overcoming a mid-
season seven-game losing streak to
wind up in the NCAA playoffs. The
Wolverines proceeded to shock national
powers Bowling Green and Boston
University before succumbing in the
final round, 6-5 in overtime, to the
Wisconsin Badgers in Olympia
Stadium. Why did the team put it all
together at once after years of incon-
sistency?
PALMER explains: "It just takes a
while to get a winning attitude.
Michigan had had some bad years in
the seventies and we learned how to win
after some of our best players left."
The L.A. Kings drafted Palmer and
the defender played 48 games for the
club his first full year out of college. He
had his best season to date in 1978-79
when he was the Kings' fourth-leading
scorer with four goals and 39 assists.
Palmer will never gain national
recognition for his scoring ability or

flashiness. Under the subhead
"Talent," the 1979 Kings' yearbook
describes Palmer as "well-trained in
basic fundamentals, his best asset is
to be in the right place at the right
time." The defenseman himself is
more succinct, "I try to play a percen-
tage."
Palmer spent two seasons in the
minors after his initial success in Los
Angeles but it appears that he has found.
a stable position in New Jersey. A
member of the Devils' penalty-killing
crew, Palmer has been playing
regularly and scored his 100th NHL
point this season. Even on the team
with the worst record in hockey,
Palmer has a lot to look forward to.

Join the

Daily Sports Staff

process with the Devils. After spending
five years in the Los Angeles Kings'
organization, Palmer chose to become
a free agent in September of 1982 and
signed an offer sheet with New Jersey.
A member of the 1977 Wolverine squad
which lost the NCAA finals in overtime,
he is not discouraged about the way
things have gone with his new team.
"IT'S A tremendous situation," said
Palmer. "We've averaged over 12,000 a
night and the fans have been really
vocal. They've also been patient. I ex-
pect that we'll be showing a lot of im-
provement soon. It's not as if we were
playing really bad hockey, we've been
in almost all the games we've played
this year."
At Michigan, Palmer played on
teams that were brimming with future
Dodgers
trade Cey
to Cubs
CHICAGO (AP) - The Los Angeles
Dodgers traded third baseman Ron
Cey, who was unable to work out a new
contract with the team, to the Chicago
Cubs for two minor league players, a
Cubs spokesman said yesterday.
Cey, 34, was in the last year of his
pact with the Dodgers and reportedly
wanted to re-negotiate the contract to
four years at an average of about
$700,000 a year.
The Dodgers refused to go along with
the proposal and Cey agreed to waive
the no-trade clause in his contract if a
deal could be worked'out.
COMPUTER TERMINALS
for RENT $47/month
TEL. 761-BYTE
RENT-A-BYTE, INC.

IN MEMORIUM

Palmer
... playing the percentages

R. TODD ELVIDGE
1961-1983

with Thomas'

umper

x:
x

RABBINICAL SCHOOL-GRADUATE SCHOOL-SEMINARY COLLEGE OF JEWISH STUDIES-CANTORS

By MIKE BRADLEY
special to the Daily
PONTIAC - Isiah Thomas hit a 10-
Wfoot jump shot from the middle of the
lane to cap a furious comeback with
three seconds remaining and lead the
Detroit Pistons to a 107-106 victory over
the Milwaukee Bucks last night at the
Silverdome.
The Bucks Sidney Moncrief, who
finished with 31 points, had his 15-foot
shot blocked by Terry Tyler -with no
time remaining on the clock.
AFTER THE game, Pistons' head
coach Scotty Robertson emphasized the

violation of the rules. A man (Tyler)
cannot break the plane of the out-of-
bounds line. We may well protest this
game."
Kelly Tripucka had 24 points, in-
cluding four free throws in the last thir-
ty seconds to pace the Pistons. Thomas
added 19 and Tyler tallied 15.
Marques Johnson had 30 for
the Bucks, including eight points in the
last two minutes which helped stake the
Bucks to 106-101 lead before the roof
caved in.

o
zJEWISH STUIIIES ,
o KIZ
x n i vi a
w IN JERUSALEM-IN NEW YORK
Visit for a semester with credit
z or enroll in a degree program.

U LADIES DAY IS EVERY DAY

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