100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 09, 1982 - Image 21

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-12-09
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



7W

Page 18-Thursday, December 9, 1982-The Michigan Daily

-W

9 9 9 9

K,

The Michigan Daily-Thursdc

Bowl previews: Georgia-Penn!
game to decide national champ

1 .

.#4

IliuIIE9
CRUNCIIActnd

t
A 60 Oz
of Marc
and a b
Nachos
Enough

SPECIAL oi
I, AlS
e. Pitcher
garitas sq
bi plate of
s Supremos.
h fnr !dnd4

ft
I.

These ancient pitchers are part of the Kelsey Museum exhibit of glass ex-
cavated in Karanis, Egypt.
Glass shines
through the ages
in Kelsey exhibit

. B
Sugar Bowl
New Orleans, La.
January 1
Georgia (11-0) vs.
Penn State (10-1)
For Sugar Bowl officials, this year's
edition of the New Year's day classic
couldn't taste any sweeter. Once again,
the Sugar Bowl will decide the NCAA
champions and for the third year in a
row the Georgia Bulldogs will be vying
for the top spot.
The only team that stands between
Georgia and its second title in three
years is Penn State, which is ranked
second in both polls behind the
Bulldogs. Under the direction of coach
Joe Paterno, the Nittany Lions have
won everything but a national title.
Paterno feels that this year's Penn
State team has as good a chance to cap-
ture that elusive title than any other
team he has coached.
"AFTER WE lost to Alabama we felt
we had six games left to win, and in the
last games we felt we had a three-game
playoff to the national championship,"
said Paterno. "We needed to beat Notre
Dame and Pittsburgh to have a chance
for the national championship. We now
have that chance."
A balanced offensive attack and a
tough defense has enabled Penn State
to be in position for a national title. The
Nittany Lion offense is pioneered by
quarterback Todd Blackledge, who
threw for 2,218 yards and 22 touchdowns
with a 55.1 percent completion rate.
Also key to the Penn State offense are
tailback Curt Warner, who rushed for
1,041 yards and eight touchdowns, and
flanker Kenny Jackson, who caught 41
passes for 509 yards.
The defensive standouts for the Nit-
tany Lions are inside linebacker Scott
Radecic and safety Mark Robinson,
who had 71 and 70 tackles respectively.
RADECIC AND Robinson will need
all the help they can get from their
teammates if they are going to stop
Georgia's sensational running back
Herschel Walker, who is on his way to
breaking all NCAA rushing records.
Still a junior, Walker is currently third
on the all-time NCAA rushing list
behind Tony Dorsett and Charles
White. This year alone Walker gained
1,752 yards and scored 16 touchdowns to
lead the Bulldogs to a perfect 11-0
record.
However, Walker is not the only
reason why Georgia is currently ranked
number one in both polls. Placekicker
Kevin Butler scored 85 points by con-
necting on 34 out of 36 extra points and
17 out of 21 field goal attempts.
-RANDY BERGER
Orange Bowl-
Miami, Fla.
January 1
LSU (8-2-1) vs.
Nebraska (10-1)
This year's Orange Bowl, to be
played January 1 in the Orange Bowl at
Miami, will pit the third-ranked
Nebraska Cornhuskers against the
Tige~ of Louisiana State.t

Nebraska (10-1) comes into the con-
test boasting seven straight victories,
including a 28-24 win over Oklahoma in
the annual "shootout" for theBig Eight
title. The Huskers' only setback came
earlier this year at the hands of Penn
State, 27-24, on a last second Nittany
Lion touchdown:
NEBRASKA, WHICH is the number
one rushing team in the nation,
averaged 386.6 yards per game, is led
by junior tailback Mike Rozier, who ran
for 1,578 yards and 16 touchdowns. The
first team Kodak All-American also
caught six passes for 46 yards and two
touchdowns and was the Big Eight Of-
fensive Player of the Year.
Leading the blocking for Rozier is
220-pound junior fullback Doug
Wilkening, who himself has picked up
374 yards and seven touchdowns on 71
carries, and 6-3, 300-pound senior cen-
ter and two-time Outland Trophy win-
ner Dave Rimington.
The Huskers also have a potent
passing attack, led by quarterback
Turner Gill, who has hit on 89 of 161
passes for 1,146 yards and 11 touch-
downs and only three interceptions.
Gill's favorite targets are senior split
end Todd Brown, with 20 receptions for
345 yards and four touchdowns, and
junior wing back Irving Fryar, with 23
catches for 327 yards and two touch-
downs.
LSU (8-2-1) enters the Orange Bowl
after suffering a 31-28 upset loss to
Tulane in its season finale. The Tigers
will rely mostly on their ball control of-
fense, headed by quarterback Alan
Risher, who has broken virtually every
LSU passing record imaginable.
In the backfield, the Tigers have a
super pair of freshmen tailbacks in
Dalton Hillierd and Garry James.
Hillerd has amassed 877 yards and 11
touchdowns on the ground, as well as
another five scores through the air.
Meanwhile, James has racked up four
touchdowns and 544 yards rushing, in
addition to catching two touchdown
strikes and throwing for another.
LSU also fields a defense that is
ranked third in the country and allowed
Alabama no first-half downs in their 20-
10 upset of the Crimson Tide. Leading
the Tiger defensive charge are
linebackers Al Richardson, Lawrence
Williams, and Lydell Malancon with
109, 102 and 61 tackles respectively.
LSU's secondary is anchored by James
Britt, who has four interseptions.
-JOE EWING
Cotton Bowl
Dallas, Texas
January 1
SMU (10-0-1) vs.
Pittsburgh (9-2)
Southern Methodist (10-0-1) will
square off against Pittsburgh (9-2) in
the Cotton Bowl on Jan. 1.
Southern Methodist qualified for the
Cotton Bowl by winning the Southwest
Conference title, just as it did a year
ago. The Mustangs were not invited last
year beacuse they were on probation,
but they should be hunry for this one af-
ter waiting an extra year.,
SOUTHERN METHODIST also has
an outstanding shot at the national
championship. For that to occur, Penn
State and Georgia would probably have

to tie in the Sugar Bowl, 3rd-ranked
Nebraska would have to lose, and the
Mustangs would have to knock off Pitt.
Before the season began, Pitt quar-
terback Dan Marino had dreams of
repeating what Tony Dorsett had done
in 1976 while playing for the Panthers.
Dorsett won the Heisman trophy that
year and led the team to a national
championship.
Marino was a pre-season candidate
for the Heisman trophy this year and
the team topped many pre-season polls.
The Heisman dream died sometime
during the fall as Marino tossed 22 in-
terceptions. Not until after the Penn
State game did the national champion-
ship dream die. "We have a chance to
win all the marbles," said Pitt coach
Foge Fazio before Pitt lost to Penn
State. Now Pitt will be playing just for
pride, as a national championship is out
of reach.
SMU BOASTS two strong running
backs in Eric Dickerson and Craig
James. Dickerson has run for 1,617
yards and 17 touchdowns this season
and will likely be a first team All-
American. James has rushed for 938
yards.
Another All-America candidate for
SMU, defensive back Russell Carter,
will try to pick off Marino passes to add
to the four interceptions he notched
during the regular season. Linebacker
Gary Moten leads the Mustangs in
tackles.
Yogi Jones, Dave Puzzuoli, and Tom
Flynn led the Pitt defense this season.
-PAUL RESNICK
Fiesta Bowl
Tempe, Ariz.
January 1
Oklahoma (8-3) vs.
Arizona State (9-2)
This year's Fiesta Bowl will feature
two teams that hoped to be spending
New Year's day elsewhere. Oklahoma
and Arizona State both lost their season
finales against their arch-rivals
(Nebraska and Arizona), which cost
them bids to the Orange and Rose
Bowls respectively.
The major consolation for the Sun
Devils will be that they will have the
home-field advantage. The Fiesta Bowl
is played in Tempe, Ariz., which also
happens to be the home of Arizona
State University. In expectation of a
Sun Devil appearance, ASU fans gob-
bled up over 30 thousand tickets for the
contest.
THIS WILL be the Sun Devils' first
appearance in a bowl game in three
years because of a two-year probation
for recruiting violations and other dirty
deeds under former head coach Frank
Kush.
Arizona State features the second-
ranked defense in the nation in terms of
yards allowed per game. The Sun
Devils have two first team All-
Americans in outside linebacker Ver-
nan Maxwell and free-safety Mike
Richardson. One of the key factors in
this game will be how Oklahoma's ex-
plosive running attack fares against the
tough Sun Devils defense.
The Sooners feature one of the best
backfields in college football with
freshman sensation Marcus Dupree,
who has carried 129 times for 905 yards

1

whic
yard
fullb
yards
run
bone
terba
91 ti
ds.
On
defer
Big F
112 s
also
tackl
Ok
balai
a pr
Hah
and
12 T
leadi
carri
BI
B'
Ho
De
Ar]
f
Th
beca
Bowl
down
Arka
No
the n
shou]
but c
that.
wrec
HE
two s
tive
for l
fumi
pass
clud
Buc
and
squa
Th
the h
by q
com
his 1
Ti
Jam
ds o
TH
dire
Jone
star
pass
mea
thro
Tay
had
Al
ning
22 p
dow
full
593
F
a FI
haw

_

S5

-W

i ruuu anu

...

drink for you and three friends ... for only
If you need to be a little more adventuresome
how about trying our many new appetizers and
sandwich selections ... like the Co. Burger, Crab
Stuffed Mushrooms and our Open Faced Prime
Rib Sandwich prepared to your liking. And don't
forget about our "Warehouse Clearance" nearly
Y price on Liquor, Beer and House Wines, 2-6 p.m.
Monday-Friday and 10-12 p.m. every Night but

Sunday.

,S OKES Shr
G44' fA'0i
60

By James Mohn
Individuals devoted to archaeology,
the arts, or ancient history should not
miss the exhibit currently featured at
the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology
that will continue through Dec. 20.
Entitled, "Wonderous Glass-Reflec-
tions on the World of Rome," the
exhibit delineates the evolution of
glassmaking, emphasizing the cultural
importance of this historic art from its
origins in Mesopotamia through the
downfall of the Roman Empire.
MOST OF the pieces in the museum's
collection of glass were taken from the
University's recent excavation at
Karanis, Egypt, and are considered to
be splendid examples of ancient
domestic glassware.
"The exhibit's primary importance is
that unlike most collections of Roman
glass, (the museum's) was not extrac-
ted from a burial site," said Gail Hof-
fmann, a University Ph.D. candidate in
classical studies.
"Instead, the objects were excavated
from the city of Karanis, meaning that
the objects give clear idications of the

domesticiuses of glassrather than its
ceremonial uses," Hoffmann said.
NUMEROUS decanters, stemmed
wine glasses, and dinnerware were
found at the excavation. The condition
of the antiquities is outstanding, and
Hoffmann noted that the excavation is
also "a significant find" because the
glass "was remarkably preserved."
. The exhibit shows several methods of
glassmaking and decorating. During
Rome's political domination of Egypt
and Syro Palestine, the free-blowing
method was discovered in local glass
workshops. The museum's collection of
free-blown glass demonstrates the
graceful symmetry and plastic elegan-
ce Roman glass artists were capable of
achieving.
The exhibit also displays several ob-
jects exemplifying the Roman
glassmaker's ability to employ
decorative techniques. Displayed are
examples of the facet-cutting, the
cameo, and the diatretum methods.
THE DIATRETUM method,
represented by an elegant piece loaned
See GLASS; Page 20

-----------

RESTAIR4NT & TAIR
3965 South State Road at Ellsworth, 994-3737
- - --

__..

4 .

tin.=s

., a s n a . c a p e .
Y M dW $ fi 9F ! ! 3k' t i =' iFk W '?! *3 s#.:* wd' - . .. .. av

I.._ .4- S'* . m ... _. __ _ _leIt i.t a l- * t-.. a a- a 4 . -- -4

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan