100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 07, 1982 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ARTS

The Michigan Daily

Tuesday, December 7, 1982

Page 7

LA: world class orchestra

Crenshaw pleases the Sunday night crowd at the Chance with some lively jams.
Marhal Seectriescrowd

By Robert Cassard
T HE LOS ANGELES Philharmonic
is the major musical institution in
Los Angeles-the musical center of the
western United States. Since its incep-
tion in 1919, the group has developed in-
to a world class orchestra under the
batons of such eminent conductors as
Alfred Wallenstein, Otto Klemperer
and Zubin Mehta and it now occupies a
stable position of international acclaim
under Carlo Maria Giulini. This year,
Ann Arbor is fortunate enough to host
the orchestra as part of its national
tour.
Giulini, who will conduct on Tuesday,
was highly venerated in Italy and
Europe before assuming the director-
ship of the Philharmonic in 1978. His
acceptance of the position he now fills
in Los Angeles was considered a
musical coup for the United States. At
68, Giulini is respected as one of the
world's great living conductors and no
one should miss the opportunity to see
him perform.
Giulini has vast experience with all
musical styles and seems especially
comfortable with the Classical and
Romantic idioms he will be exploring
on Tuesday.,The program consists of
two symphonic masterworks:
Schubert's Symphony No. 4 in C minor,
D.417 (the so-called "Tragic" sym-
phony) and Bruckner's imposing Sym-
phony No. 9 in D Minor. Both pieces are
closely tied to the musical styles which
prevailed at the time of their com-
position and should complement and
contrast with each other nicely while
also bringing out different aspects of
the orchestra's performing ability and
the conductor's interpretive skills.
The Fourth Symphony shows
Schubert at his most Beethoven-like.
The work was composed in 1816 at the
age of nineteen, when Schubert was just
beginning to come to his musical
maturity. As the work bears out though,
the young composer was certainly still
under Beethoven's spell.
As a Beethoven piece, this symphony
would lack urgency and inevitability.
Although it shares the key signature of

C minor with what is perhaps
Beethoven's most intensely dramatic
work-his Fifth Symphony-Schubert's
work falls significantly short of its
sister work on a dramatic level. The
fact that Schubert subtitled the sym-
phony "Tragic" may be indicative of
the drama he may have been attem-
pting to convey. Purely as a Schubert
piece, however, this work is one of the
earliest to display the young master's
musical gifts in full flower.
The Adagio introduction of the first
movement is serious but hardly tragic
in tone and the key changes in the
following Allegro Vivace all but ignore
convention which might add to their
dramatic effect. While the standard key
change in the sonata form would be
from the tonic minor (C minor) into the
relative major (E-flat major) or
dominant minor (G minor), Schubert
opts, interestingly, to move into the key
of A-flat major, completely dismissing
formal key relationships.
Schubertian lust for melody comes to
the forefront in the Andante and this
singing quality is emotional both in its
content and effect. This is Schubert at
his best as the composer himself.
seemed to recognize later when he
SMA HOLIDAY TREAT

mirrored the theme of this movement
in his second Impromptu for Piano
composed 22 years later.
The third movement, on the other
hand, is anti-Schubertian with its
modified dance form and added syn-
copations as well as its chromatic
melody. The final Allegro entirely
abandons strict form and finds
Schubert at his most "prophetic." The
later music of Mendelssohn and even
Wagner are often suggested by the
direct and emphatic minor tone of the,
movement, especially in the horns.
Composed mostly between 1887 and
1894, Bruckner's Symphony No. 9 in D
minor also shows a similarity to the
work of Beethoven. It' shares its title
with Beethoven's Ninth Symphony as
well as its mystical opening, expansive
first movement and quickened second
movement. Yet even while the music
pays a certain homage to Beethoven, it
is in nearly every way marked by
Bruckner's individualism and musical
audaciousness.
The first movement is built on four
major themes and each of them is fully
developed before rising to a feverish
climax. The second section of the
See LA, Page 9
FOR THE FAMILY
DECEMBER 8-11
MICHIGAN
THEATRE

By Susan Makuch
A SK MARSHALL Crenshaw what
the difference is between the
first time he played at the Second
Chance and his Sunday night ap-
pearance there, and he'll tell you what
he told me after the concert: "Well, the
first time I played here was about seven
years ago, and the difference between
the (two) crowds is that seven years
ago I think there was no crowd."
,Luckily for Marshall, the years have
been good to him. Not only was there
quite a gathering on hand for his return
to Ann Arbor, but a more enthusiastic
mob couldn't have been purchased, not
at any price.
s When the loudspeaker announced,
"Here comes Snap, Krackle, and Pop,"
Marshall, his brother (drummer)
obert, and Chris Donato (bassist) en-
tered the small stage. Screams and
*cheers abounded, and Marshall gave
them all a sly smile. After the group
finished a rousing rendition of "There
She Goes Again," Marshall apologized
pr the "psychotic that introduced us."
tMe informed the audience (needlessly)
that "we are the Marshall Crenshaw
band."
Before Marshall formed his
n'amesake band, he played in a few
Detroit area groups. Why didn't he
stick with those original bands? "I
r'ealized there was no point in con-
tinuing in those bands, I knew I could go
farther on my own." Judging by the
reaction of Marshall's local followers,
he is definitely correct.
, As he began to "inflict some more of
our album on (the audience)," Mar-
shall had the crowd in the palm of his
guitar-picking hand. As it was, Mar-
shall's rocking, rhythmic performance
of "Brand New Lover," from his debut
album Marshall Crenshaw, captivated
the crowd. Quite deservedly, too.
It really surprised me that the Cren-
shaw band could create such a powerful
sound from just three members.
bonato on bass and vocals was par-
ticularly impressive, displaying a stage
presence that complemented Marshall
!without overpowering him. We knew it
-as Marshall's trio, but he never forced
it on us. The other factor in the group's
success, Robert Crenshaw on drums
and vocals, is a terribly good per-
cussionist. He, too, is effective without
;rowning out his older brother. In fact,
When on a rare occasion an extra per-
cussion section is needed, as in the case
of "Cynical Girl," another Crenshaw
lad joins the group. When Marshall in-
troduced the number on Sunday night,
he added this preamble: "My brother
John is here to help us out on per-
cussion-he's just one of the 'Incredible
Crenshaw Brothers.' " Marshall's ap-
parent immodesty aside, he was en-
tirely correct.
.Actually, for the amount of fame that
has been thrust upon him in the last
FA ST STEREO SERVICE
TV RENTALS
USED EQUIPMENT
HI FI STUDIO
215 S. ASHLEY
DOWNTOWN 1 BLOCK WEST OF MAIN
2 BLOCK NORTH OF LIBERTY
7h9-0392 or 68-7492
764-0558

several eventful months, Marshall
Crenshaw has remained surprisingly
down to earth. Although he makes his
home in New York City now, he still
maintains close family ties in this area.
As a matter of fact, his parents were at
the show. The senior Mr. Crenshaw
admits that he's enjoying his sons' suc-
cess: "I think it's just marvelous."
When asked if he did anything in par-
ticular to cultivate such talent in his
boys, he says, "No, we just promote
music, any kind of music."
The current notoriety around Mar-
shall leaves him with a distaste for
fame. 'I don't like being famous, I like
being busy," he coyly claims. Although~
he writes a myriad of songs, he "enjoys
doing shows and making records the
most."
Marshall's blatant pleasure in per-
forming was obvious on Sunday night.
He toyed withtheaudience, let them
know that he wanted them to have as
good a time as he was having. At one
point, before he introduced a pulsating
tune called "Girls . . .", Marshall
flashed a dazzling half-grin at the
patrons and shouted, "What is sum-
mer? It's sweat and perspiration and
Hygrade hotdogs. . . and girls!" The
wild beats of the song began and so did
the roar of the crowd.
Other well-received numbers in-
cluded "She Can't Dance," "Mary An-
ne," "The Usual Thing," all from his
new album. Then he paid tribute to the
late, great king of ro'k 'n' roll, Elvis
Presley. "Here's one of his songs from
one of his crummy movies," cried Mar-
shall. "It Takes Two," was the movie
tribute. By far and away, however, the
most popular song of the evening was
one of Marshall's own personal
favorites, "Someday, Someway."
Which is Marshall's favorite? "I like
'em all," he obligingly states. But
which is his absolute fave? "Well, I like
'Someday, Someway,' but I also like
'Cynical Girl.' I think they are probably

the best that I've written," Marshall
says.
When Marshall sang the Motown
classic, "S.O.S.," he commented that
"a lot of good music has come from
this area." So it is not surprising that
his personal choice for best musical ar-
tist of all time is none other than a
Motor City boy, Smokey Robinson.
"Smokey is my hero," Marshall ad-
mits. "I believe he is the greatest pur-
veyor of pop music in my lifetime," he
adds. "There's nothing more I can say,
he's my idol; my only goal in this
business is to meet and work with him,"
Marshall confesses.
If they do combine musical forces, it
won't be on Marshall's next album, due
to begin production in January. "I'll be
writing all the material, except for one
cover tune," he says.
Maybe after the second Marshall
Crenshaw album is complete, he'll be
able to remedy the only problem he had
Sunday night-he'll have more
material and thus be able to play for
more than an hour and a half. The
crowd craved more of this dynamic,
animated performer, but after two
double-song encores, Marshall ran dry.
As long as he's writing, his excited
followers will be turning out in droves
to see his electrifying performing.

JACT
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre

tlh1

I

presents 8:00 p.m.
Sat. Matinee 2:00 p.m.
The Ma
Michigan Theatre
Sound /Box Office Hours:
Mon.-Tues. 12-6
of M usic . Wed.-Sat. 12-8
by Rodgers and Hammerstein Box Office: 668-8480

I

Since you can't come
to Helix, we'll bring
photo savings to you.
Helix brings all the advantages of a major Chicago photographic retailer right to your
mailbox. We have one of the largest stores in the entire country, with complete cam-
era, underwater photography, darkroom, movie and electronics departments. And we
always have low prices on everything we stock. Like the fabulous Pentax K 1000. This
35-millimeter camera is a real work horse, perfect for a student photographer, or any-
one who wants to become an expert with a single-lens-reflex camera. The Pentax K1000
is priced to fit a student budget, so you won't have to give up too many pizzas to afford
it! Now you know an easy way to save money on photo equipment. Shop by mail and
have a photographic giant at your fingertips-Helix.
Pentax
ASAI.K1000
P155 The perfect
1student camera
A fully manual 35-millimeter SLR with
shutter speeds to 1/1000th of a second,
hot shoe, automatic "shutter-cocked
windicator'" and microprism focusing
screen.
Pentax K1000 with 50mm
f2.0 Pentax lens:
_1 includes all
$136 *Jshipping and
insurance costs

/

i

I ANIIA ARESR

k

I

I t'1 ss s is

2 INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
$1.50 TUESDAY ALL SHOWS
"BAWDY,
RIP-ROARING
100-PROOF COMEDY!"
Kathleen Carroll, N.Y. Daily News
DONIS,
An Outrageous Comedy
TUES-4:50, 6:40, 8:30, 10:20 N
WED-1:10, 3:00, 4:50, 6:40, 8:30, 10:20
THE MOST PRAISED AND
LOVED ROMANTIC FILM
OF THE SEASON
DEBRA WINGER
RICHARD GERE
AN OFFICER
ANDA
GENTLEMAN (R)
TUES-5:10, 7:20, 9:30
WED-12:50, 3:00, 5:10, 7:20, 9:30

Ow

SALS

NON IDPT bE

6

To order your Pentax K1000 at this special student price (which includes all ship-
ping costs), fill out this coupon, and mail it with your check or money order to
Helix, 325 West Huron Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610. If you also want to be
added to our mailing list, check below. Please allow at least 10 days for delivery.
Pentax K1000 with 50mm f2.0 lens (including shipping), $ 136.95 enclosed.
NAME:
I ADDRESS:
PHONE: ( )

1I
I

py,

1
t

I

C*ATUi G

Yes, please add me to your mailing list. E
- - -- - - ---- - - E
® Offer good
through
12/31/82.
325 West Huron Street, Chicago, Illinois 60610 312/944-4400

I

-1 5 7 ) 5 IW Y 11-

a 1Lx
\7
75P~ N
N. - -

d
i qy

An evening with
J , j - d

~r.
~..
V.j
{

f~' U4 it;

I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan