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December 05, 1982 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-12-05

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, December 5, 1982-Page 5

China OKs new

constitution

PEKING (AP)- China adopted a new constitution
yesterday that puts top priority on stability and
economic growth and pushes aside Maoist calls for
constant turmoil.
The document, which replaces a 1978 constitution
that embodied the late Chairman Mao Tse-tung's
ideas of shakeups to maintain political purity, won
3,037 yes votes in the National People's Congress.
There were three abstentions, but no negative votes.
AFTER LATE revisions to underscore some of
China's major concerns-an independent foreign
policy and strong family planning in this nation of 1
billion people-delegates dropped pink ballots in 30
bright red boxes around the hall.
China's top leader, Deng Xiaoping, Communist
Party General Secretary Hu Yaobang and Premier

Zhao Ziyang lined up with other officials to vote at
center stage.
Ye Jianying, 85, chairman of the congress' stan-
ding committee, was not present but put his ballot in
a mobile ballot box sent around for aged and infirm
delegates, the official Xinhua news agency reported.
HE WILL continue to serve as equivalent to head of
state until the election by the congress next year of a
national president, a post restored by the new con-
stitution.
Chinese leaders also have acknowledged worries
by foreign businessmen, whose investment,
technology and management expertise now are
sought. The new constitution specifies that China
permits foreigners to invest there and will protect
"their lawful rights and interests."

Xinhua quoted one congress delegate, Zhu Erpei,
Communist Party secretary of Shanghai's new
Baoshan iron and steel works, as saying, "The
Cultural Revolution taught our people how important
a constitution is. I'm ready to defend the constitution
with my life."
It said Rong Yiren, general manager of the China
International Trust and Investment Corp., added that
the constitution reaffirms China's open-door
economic policy and "I am confident that it will
promote economic and technical cooperation bet-
ween China and other countries."
After 1 2years of work, China published a draft of
the new constitution in April.

Eleanor Roosevelt
top first lady in poll'

ol-4

NEW YORK (AP)- A poll of
historians placed Eleanor Roosevelt at
the top of the list of presidents' wives
because she "defined what a first lady
ought to be in the 20th century," the
survey's co-author said yesterday.
The variety of Mrs. Roosevelt's in-
terests, "her omnipresence, her vitality
and her inexhaustible energy,
established a benchmark," Siena
College professor Thomas Kelly said.
NANCY REAGAN, meanwhile,
placed 39th of 42 first ladies primarily
because "she's following a traditionally
'help-mate' role," Kelly said.
Mrs. Reagan also was hurt by "the
adverse publicity about her taste. She
was seen as not doing anything but
living a frivolous and expensive life,"
he said.
Kelly, along with Siena statistics
professor Douglas Lonnstrom, presen-
ted an analysis of the survey at a con-
ference on the role of the first lady
sponsored by Hunter College and the
Eleanor Roosevelt Institute. The

results initially were released Sept. 2.
ACCORDING to the survey, the top 10
first ladies were: Mrs. Roosevelt,
Abigail Adams, Lady Bird Johnson,
Dolly Madison, Rosalynn Carter, Betty
Ford, Edith Wilson, Jackie Kennedy,
Martha Washington and Edith
Roosevelt.
Last place in the survey went to Mary
Lincoln. Just above here were Florence
Harding, Ida McKinley, Mrs. Reagan,
Jane Pierce and Pat Nixon.
Kelly said the survey suggests "very
strongly that college history professors
tend to respect relatively strong, 'non-
traditional' women in the role of first
lady."
THAT POINT, he said, is bolstered by
Betty Ford's appearance in sixth place.
Mrs. Ford, who was active in many
causes during her husband's White
House tenure, was the only "recent"
Republican first ladyto make the upper
half of the list, he said.
Lonnstrom said he and Kelly sent out
300 questionnaires in March to history
department heads at universities and
colleges picked at random by com-
puter. He said 102 usable responses
were returned.
POETRY READING
with Alexander Blain
Corky Bunch & Polly Castor
reading from their works
Monday, December 6
8:00 pm
GUILD HOUSE--802 Monroe

Tomorrow.ees
something special brewing
at Uno's
44
LABATT'S
PITCHER
AFTER 9 PM
A --- -
PIZZA BY THE SLICE- $1 .00

I

Statue movers AP Photo
Using a harness around the neck, workers in Columbus, Oh. lower a bronze
statue of Ohio Gov. James Rhodes to the ground yesterday before placing it
on a granite pedestal. The statue will be publicly unveiled today.

State bonds to fund 'U' hospital

LANSING (UPI)- The State
Building Authority has approved the
largest single investment in state
history to be used to finance the con-
struction of the 586-bed Replacement
*;Hospital Project at the University.
The authority has approved the sale
of $237.9 million in bonds-at 11.8 percent
interest to pay for the project that will
finance $140 million of the hospital's
$191.5 million cost.
An additional $33 million will be
provided by the state's general coffers

for the site preparation.
"I AM extremely pleased we are able
to move ahead with modernizing an
important part of this medical 'com-
munity at this time, as well as to
provide badly needed construction
jobs," Gov. William Milliken said
Friday.
Just under half the sale-$100
million-was insured and had the top
AAA rating. The rest was sold under
lesser A-minus ratings from one agency

and BAA from another.
A slight improvement in the market
allowed underwriters to reprice the
bonds and achieve a lower interest cost,
William Friend, senior vice president of
New York's Blyth Eastman Paine
Webber Inc. and financial advisor to
the authority said.
He added the sale was made during a
busy time for the market.

DAILY 11:30-2 a.m. FROZEN AND CARRY-
1321 S. UNIVERSITY OUT AVAILABLE
ANN ARBOR 769-1894
restaurant and bar

BPC: Changing the course of the 'U'

(Continued from Page 1)
Business School Dean Gilbert Whitaker,
who has been on the committee two
years. "When you make a public
statement you lose your ability to
change your mind."
,Under the five-year-plan, the respon-
sibilities of the committee have been
changing. The issues it deals with have
evolved from state aid strategies and
general budget advice to issues cutting

at the very heart of the University's
future.
THE TURNING point came about
two years ago, when a desperately tight
budget was loosened by the elimination
of LSA's geography department, and a
deep cut to the University Extension
Services and Recreation Sports. The
effect was to shock administrators to
set up the long range goals of the five-
year plan.

Before these cuts, money wasn't such
a limited resource. All the committee
had to do was advise Frye on how much
more money each unit should get every
year. Now, it recommends how much
less each should get.
"This is not a neutral process,;"
Moeller said. "They are looking to cut.
Anybody that doesn't know that has
been walking around with blinders."

TEDDY ROOSEVELT
"STARS AND STRIPES
FOREVER" ANNA HELD
"BILL BAILEY WON'T
YOU PLEASE COME
HOME" SCOTT JOPLIN
"TA-RA-RA-BOOM-DE-
AT" "A HOT TIME IN
THE OLD TOWN
TONIGHT" EMMA
GOLDMAN GEORGE M.
COHAN "NOBODY"
"MEET ME IN ST.
LOUIS" "IN MY MERRY
OLDSMOBILE"
"TOYLAND" "THE
RAGTIME DANCE"
"THE YANKEE DOODLE
BOY" ELLIS ISLAND
"HELLO, MA BABY"
VAUDEVILLE
"ELECTRICITY"
"YOU'RE A GRAND
OLD FLAG" "AMERICA
THE BEAUTIFUL"
"SMILES" HENRY J.
SAYERS "WABASH

CANNONBALL"
"SOLACE" "RAGTIME
NIGHTINGALE"
"JONAH MAN" A
BIRD IN A GILDED
CAGE" "SHORTNIN'
BREAD" "PASTIME
RAG" JOHN PHILIP
SOUSA VICTOR
HERBERT "WALTZ ME
AROUND AGAIN
WILLIE" "WAIT FOR
THE WAGON" "WE
SHALL NOT BE
MOVED" "AMERICAN
BEAUTY" "EL
CAPITAN" "BERT
WILLIAMS JOSEPH F.
LAMB "KENTUCKY
BABE" GEORGE
WALKER "IF I WERE ON
THE STAGE, KISS ME
AGAIN" "WHAT IT
TAKES TO MAKE ME
LOVE YOU" "ELITE
SYNCOPATIONS" "I'M
GONNA LIVE ANYHOW,
TIL I DIE"

Japan educates for productivity,

I

BEST OF
Dec. 10-11 8 pm

BROADWAY
Dec. 12 2 pm, 8 pm
CENTER

POWER

(Continued from Page 1)
school graduate has the equivalent of
about four more years of schooling than
the U.S. high school graduate because,
df a longer school week and more weeks
to the school year.
" In both mathematics and science
the mean scores of Japan's school
children are higher than in any other
country, and far higher than in the
United States.
Moreover, there is less variability to
scores, which suggests that educational
achievement in Japan is widespread.
Source: International Study of
Achievement in Mathematics,
published by John Wiley & Sons.
" Thirteen percent of U.S. high school
students in a survey could not perform
reading tasks designated "functional";
28 percent could not answer questions
testing "literal comprehension" of
what they read; and nearly 10 percent
couldn't write prose deemed
marginally acceptable.
"THE RESULTS," Freund reports,
~'were much w orse with, regard to
anything beyond basic skills ... Fifty-
three percent couldn't write a letter
correcting a billing error." Source:
National Assessment for Educational
Progress, Denver.
No comparison could be made at the
college level, simply because American
institutions are so far superior to
Japan's. In fact, the stock exchange
study states, Japanese colleges are a
four-year vacation free of demands.
To some extent, it might be said, a
young Japanese demonstrates his men-

business involvement in our schools,"
the report concludes. "If the first pur-
pose of our schools is to create good
citizens, the second is to create produc-
tive people."
More businesses, it suggests, might
get involved in "adopt-a-school"
programs, irk which company personnel
could aid students through tutoring or
provide them with equipment. Those
students, remember, might become
employees.
SOME companies, of course, are
already doing so. In Los Angeles, said
Freund, 105 businesses are par-
ticipating in adopt-a-school programs,
and some high technology companies in
various parts of the country have been
known to donate electronic equipment.
And many big-city companies with, a
need for clerks run their own little
schools to teach basic mathematics and
English.

Corporate support seems to be
greater at the college level. Inter-
national Business Machines Corp., for
example, is now deciding which
colleges will benefit from a $50 million
program of cash and equipment grants.
The purposes of the grants is to up-
date engineering courses because, says
John Opel, president, "Training people
who can make the most of the new
technologies requires close cooperation
between universities and industry."

PTP Ticket Office
Michigan League 764-0450

1 is

l

A $200 CHRISTMAS GIFT
FOR $40

Contincntai
'Dining~luG.

HOUSING DIVISION
FOR 1982-83 ACADEMIC YEAR
POSITION OPENING: RESIDENT ADVISOR-
Eaton House, Baits I(Male Corridor)
Interested individuals who have an updated application on file
may call the Housing Office (763-3161) and request that their
application be forwarded to Baits. New applicants may pick up
an application; job description, etc., in the Housing Office,
1500 S.A.B. from 8:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon and from 12:30 p.m.-
4:30 p.m., Tuesday, November 30 through Tuesday, December

Pick up a .Y....
Continental
Dining Club
membership
card at Mountain Jack's for
only $40. And the next 12
times you dine here, we'll
pick up part of the check.
50% of your total food bill
for 2 dinners. 331/3% for 3.

f2 ' t s;53 tv~9 ; a ?, f, s'
,, SA &z. $23tso iw
t:wJY 33 :31L.'tJ

25% for 4.20%
for 5. Or 15%
for 6 meals.

Every time you come
in, for up to 12 times.
Altogether, the Card could
spring for hundreds of
dollars on your meal checks.
Which makes it the perfect
dining companion.

mmu unasm mu

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