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December 05, 1982 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-12-05

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The Michigan Daily-Sunday, December 5, 1982-Page 3

Dems look to Glenn to
replace Kennedy in '84

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Although it is 14 months before the,
WASHINGTON (AP)- With Sen. Iowa party caucuses begin the process
Edward Kennedy out of the picture, of choosing delegates to the 1984
many Democrats are taking a close and Democratic National Convention, for-
hopeful look at John Glenn as a mer Vice President Walter Mondale
presidential prospect in 1984. But poten- has a strong organization and Sens.
tial supporters are described as ap- Gary Hart of Colorado and Alan Cran-
prehensive and frustrated by Glenn's ston of California are moving rapidly to
slowness to build a campaign build campaign staffs.
organization. By contrast, the Glenn organization is
"The right thing for John Glenn to do lagging.
right now is get a campaign BUT GLENN, a former astronaut, is
organization put together," says Bob a genuine hero, the man whom
Keefe, a veteran political consultant Democrats like to compare to Dwight
working part-time for the Democratic Eisenhower in terms of his appeal.
senator from Ohio. Many party officials believe the former
KEEFE WAS asked how Glenn's Marine officer has the potential to be
potential backers are feeling about the the Democrats' strongest candidate in
leisurely pace at which the Glenn 1984
organization is developing. "Antsy is a That view often comes from
good word, frustrated is another good politicians who also admit privately
word," he responded. they don't know where Glenn stands on
HAPPENINGS
Sunday

most issues.
"It's a suspension of judgment," said
one party official who insisted on
anonymity. "I've seen a lot of presiden-
tial honeymoons. This is the first time
I've seen a candidate get a
honeymoon."
A STATE Democratic Party leader,
describing Glenn's appeal, said that
during an appearance in her state he
was sharply critical of Reagan ad-
ministration budget cuts for education
and scientific research.
"The crowd loved it," she said. "If it
had been any of the candidates viewed
as a liberal, people would have said it's
just more Democratic big spending.
But from Glenn they accepted it."
Glenn needs to overcome a widely
held impression that he is a dull
speaker. The problem not only is style
but his use of material that often reads
like an engineering manual.

Drinker's dream AP Photo
Workmen load a tank car containing Canadian whiskey onto a barge after it was recovered from the bottom of San
Francisco Bay Friday. High winds from a Pacific storm blew several railroad cars off a barge last Tuesday.

Transplantpatient
undergoes surgery

Highlight
Alois Fleishmann, Irish composer and director of the Cork International
Choral and Folk Dance Festival, will speak on "The New School of Irish
Composers" today at 4 p.m. in Rackham Assembly Hall, under the joint
sponsorship of the School of Music and Eastern Michigan University's music
department.
Films
Hill St.-Love Bug, 1, 3:30 p.m.; Zorba the Greek, 7, 9:30 p.m., 1450 Hill St.
Cinema Guild-The Seventh Seal, 7, 9 p.m., Lorch.
Cinema II-Traffic, 7 p.m.; Alexander, 8:40 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Performances
Musical Society-Handel's "Messiah," 2:30 p.m., Hill Aud.
School of Music-Student Chamber Music Recital, 2 p.m., Recital Hall;
Piano Students Recital; 4 p.m., Recital Hall; Piano Recital, Wendy Stofer, 6
p.m., Recital Hall.
Theatre & Drama-"The Tempest," 2 p.m., Power Center.
Hebrew Day School-Concert by Louis Nagel, 7:30 p.m., Beth Israel
Congregation social hall.
Miscellaneous
Eclipse-Workshop, Eyges, Lancaster & Murray, 2 p.m., Trotter House.
Aikido Club-Meeting, 6 p.m., 606 Hoover St.
Racquetball Club-Practice, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., NCRB Courts 1-5.
Kelsey Museum-Gallery Talk, Jim Higginbotham, "Roman Glass," 2
p.m., Kelsey.
Student Wood and Crafts Shop-Safety class, hand tools, 6-8 p.m., 537 SAB.
Wesley Fellowship-Dinner and devotion, drama performance from
Covenant Players, 5:30 p.m., State & Huron.
Monda
Highlight
The Performance Network concludes this fall's Works in Progress series
today with "Jason," a play by poet/playwright Newt Barenose. The perfor-
mance is at 7 p.m. at 408 W. Washington.
Performances
Guild House-Poetry Readings, Alexander Blain, Corky Bunch, Polly
Castor, 8 p.m., 802 Monroe.
A School of Music-Piano Students Rectial, 8 p.m., Rackham Hall.
Speakers
Women's Research Club-Martha Krieg, "Computer-Assisted Edition of
the Middle English Primer," 7:45 p.m., W. Conf. Rm., Rackham.
Near Eastern and North African Studies-Brown Bag, Birol Yeshilda,
"Failure of Consociational Democracy in Cyprus: 1960-1963," noon, Lane
Hall Commons Rm.
Chemistry-Inorganic Sem., Robert Taylor, "Multinuclear NMR Studies
of Cis Platin-DNA Base Interactions," 4 p.m., 1200 Chem.
Computing Ctr.-Forrest Hartman, "Microcomputers & MTS," 2 p.m., 171
BSAD.
Markley-Joshua Peck, "The Media's Treatment of the Middle East," 8
p.m., Markley Concourse Lounge.
Torah Ctr. of Metro Detroit-Rabbi Avraham Jacobowitz, "Jewish
Christmas: Everything You Wanted to Know About Chanukah But Were
Afraid to Ask," 5 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
* Meetings
Christian Science-7:15 p.m., League Rm. D.
LSA-Faculty Mtg., 4:10 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Women's Network-noon, League Rms. 4& 5.
SACUA-1:15 p.m., 4025 Fleming Admin. Bldg.
Renaissance Universal Club-"Neo-Humanism: Beyond Internationalism
to World Peace," 7 p.m., Union Welker Rm.
Miscellaneous
Tae Kwon Do Club-Practice, 6 p.m., CCRB Martial Arts Rm.
Eclipse Jazz-Workshop series on jazz improvisation by David Swain, 8
p.m., Trotter House.
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority-Benefit Skating Party, 9 p.m., Ann Arbor
Skate Co., 2275 Platt Rd.
Turner Geriatric Clinic-New Learning Program, "Developing Inter-
dependence: Attitudes toward Caring for One Another," 1 p.m., Child and
Family Services, 2301 Platt Rd.
Michigan Union-Exhibit and sale of foil etchings and Austrian Strass
Crystal pendants and prisms, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Union first floor.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

(Continued from Page 1)
could be serious.
PETERSON emphasized the ar-
tificial heart, first permanent blood
pump implanted in a human, was
working normally.,
le said the air also could be coming
from the lung tissue itself. If that were
the case, surgeons would put in another
tube to suck up the air and keep it from
diffusing into the tissue.
"I'm not terribly concerned," said
Dr. Robert Jarvik, inventor of the Jar-
vik-7 artificial heart.
Clark had been listed in serious but
stable condition before yesterday's
operation, and his surgeon, Dr. William
DeVries, had planned to start him
eating normal food and walking.
"I JUST want to thank everybody
who has had anything to do with this,"
Clark's wife, Una Loy, told reporters
earlier Saturday. "I'm very grateful."
She recalled what her 61-year-old
husband told her before the operation to
implant the artificial heart.
"He said, 'Just in case I don't see you

again, I want you to know you've been a.
darned good wife.' " Later, after the
surgery, she told him that she loved
him.
"HE PUT his hand on his chest," she
said. "I said, 'You're trying to tell us
you love us,' and he nodded. "I said,
'I'm so grateful. I thought maybe since
you have an artificial heart, you might
not still love us.' " Clark's son, Dr.
Stephen Clark, said his father was
"beginning to act himself this mor-
ning."
"We're all beginning to see that light
in his eye and that will sustain him,"
said the younger Clark, a surgeon.
"We're certainly more hopeful, now
than a few days ago."
On Monday, Clark and his wife - who
have been married for 39 years - boar-
ded a commercial flight from Seattle to
Salt Lake City, his heart rapidly
drawing life from his fatigued body.
He received a polyurethane heart in a
seven-hour operation that began ahead
of schedule late Wednesday as his con-
dition worsened.

-New U of M Course Offering-
INTRODUCTION TO JEWISH LAW
taught by Rabbi Rod Glogower
THREE CREDITS IN JUDAIC STUDIES DEPT.
Tues., 9-11 am; Thurs. 10-11 am
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 663-3336

° ° y
l, i' v

Reagan completes visit to
Latin American countries

(Continued from-Page1 )
administration counts on those- four
Central American nations tohelp coun-
ter what it considers a communist-led
effort to win control of the region.
Nicaragua's Sandanista leadership was
excluded from Reagan's agenda.
REAGAN ALSO said in a radio ad-
dress to the American people yesterday
that Congress must approve his Carib-
bean aid program or face "an exodus of
desperate people" to the United States.
Reagan, giving the weekly address
from the Costa Rican presidential
palace as he wrapped up the five-day
Latin American trip, called his Carib-
bean Basin Initiative a "top priority" of
the lame-duck Congress that adjourns
later this month.
"Our Caribbean Basin Initiative,
designed to provde economic oppor-
tunity by stimulating investment and

trade offers the hope of economic
progress which anchors democracy and
freedom," the president said. "Final
passage this year is top priority."
HE SAID the program was essential
to addressing the poverty of the region,
which the United States is very much
affected by.
"Prolonged social and economic
disruption would cause an exodus of
desperate people seeking refuge where
who many others have already found it,
in the United States," Reagan said.
"Trade is the path for new progress
for everyone," he said.
One of the first highly successful
Gothic novels was "The Monk" by Mat-
thew Gregory Lewis. It was first
published in 1976.

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ewhouse Newspapers
"'DON'S PARTY' IS VERY FUNNY INDEED!
BRUCE BEOESFORD MAY BE THE BEST THING THAT'S HAPPENED TO MOVIES
SINCE WILLIAM WYLER, DAVID LEAN AND FRED ZINNEMANN."
Lewis Archibald. Aquarian
"BAWDY, FASCINATING, COMPELLING STUFF!"
-Rex ReedN.Y. Daily News
DON'S
PART
An Outrageous Comedy
Directed by
BRUCE BERESFORD ("Breaker Mor.nt"::
FRI, MON-6:40, 8:30, 10:20

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